Whitecourt Industrial Liquid Rubber Roof Coating, June 9 2015

Article: Liquid Rubber Roof Coating. Industrial Waterproofing. Whitecourt, Alberta.

This is a site report for a liquid rubber roof coating to waterproof an industrial standing seam metal roof in Whitecourt, Alberta. Roof maintenance coatings will extend the life of a metal roof for many years avoiding costly roof replacement.

We started applying liquid rubber to metal roof systems in Canada about six years ago.

At first we were concerned because many of the elastomeric roof coatings are manufactured for the wider market - which is the USA. Of course this causes a challenge because most of the USA needs reflect or white roof coatings due to the temperature. If you have more warm days than cold days it is best to use a white or cool roof coating in most instances. If you have more cold days than warm days then a dark coating is typically the best choice.

We used various elastomeric coatings in various areas of Canada and over time came to be most confident in applying liquid rubber.

Engineered coatings with advanced polymer technology has changed the game for coating roofs in Canada.

Now that we have millions of square feet of coatings on roofs in Canada we can confidently say that liquid rubber is the best coating you can get for cold climates.

Some Liquid Rubber Facts and Ten Benefits of Using Liquid Rubber on Metal Roofs:

  1. Liquid rubber will waterproof your metal roof. It is monolithic. In other words, when we coat a roof everything is tied in to the main coating. The penetration holes, the parapet walls, the flashing, curbs, crickets and more. There is nowhere for the water to back up or penetrate openings. This is the primary advantage of a coating vs. a membrane system or a metal panel system.
  2. It is a rust inhibitor. If you have a metal roof that is either rusting or will rust due to the materials stored inside, liquid rubber is the best choice.
  3. It is a net benefit for building efficiency in cold climates. Recent studies have confirmed what we knew all along. Simply google key word phrases such as "cool roofing studies for cold climates" and you will find that coating a roof with a cool or white coating in a cold climate is not a wise decision.
  4. It will melt ice dams quicker and it will melt ice in the gutter quicker. A common problem with metal roof systems in cold climates is ice. When ice dams form they cause havoc with metal roof seams between panels, roof vents and curbs and ice in the gutter can "wick" up and under the eave area and melt and cause leaks at the inner wall. We can tie in the gutter system, the wall area and the roof with liquid rubber so no ice can "wick" in to your roof system.
  5. Coating industrial, commercial and any sort of internal gutter system with liquid rubber will solve a lot of problems you may be experiencing with your gutter systems. Especially troublesome are steel erected buildings with parapet walls that have low slope metal roofs and internal gutter systems along the inside of the parapet walls. Liquid rubber can solve that by tying the roof, the gutter and the parapet wall all together as one monolithic membrane system.
  6. It is UV stable. It does not need a reflective coating. It does not need pea gravel. It doesn't peel and crack in the sun.
  7. Liquid Rubber is non toxic, VOC free and solvent free. It cures to provide a seamless, fully adhered flexible membrane. It protects from UV, salt, thermal cycling and harmful chemicals. It is both worker and environmentally safe and is available for commercial, industrial and residential markets.
  8. When we coat your roof it is considered a maintenance invoiced service. Many customers tell us there are tax benefits to maintenance vs. replacement. Check with your accountant.
  9. Liquid Rubber works well in cold climates. It has an expansion rate of up to 1000%. Unlike other products, buildings that have liquid rubber installed by us in cold climates with heavy snow loads are doing well. We have liquid rubber installations in the coldest areas of Canada with snow loads over ten feet and liquid rubber has performed like no other product we can find (specifically for cold climates).
  10. It has an excellent cost value. In other words, to replace a standing seam industrial roof it can cost between 9.00 - 30.00 per square foot. Liquid rubber is a fraction of the cost. It has a ten year warranty with an optional twenty year service agreement available from us. If you need R value, we can spray your roof with foam and cover it in liquid rubber. But if you just need waterproofing, liquid rubber is all you need.

Visit our main web site for more information on Liquid Rubber Roof Coatings.

Here's a video showing our crews at work and the scope of work typically followed when coating metal roof systems:

Below is the roof coating crew's account of this liquid rubber installation.

November 7, 2014: Crew attends to site location near Whitecourt, Alberta.

This is a electrical sub station that added an addition on to their building. The first deficiency was where they joined the building together there was an open split on both sides. Water was running down and leaking in to the building. I sealed it in with seam tape and Liquid Rubber. After that we prepared the roof fasteners, seams, etc and then we started to roll in the roof. We didn't spray this roof because it was smaller in size. Unfortunately it started to rain when we got to the 70% mark and there is rain in the forecast for many days. We will have to return at a later date to finish the coating.

Metal roof seam issue where roofs were connected that needs waterproofing.
Metal roof seam issue where roofs were connected that needs waterproofing.
Standing seam metal roof before liquid rubber roof coating.
Standing seam metal roof before liquid rubber roof coating.
Liquid rubber coating applied to seventy percent of building.
Liquid rubber coating applied to seventy percent of building.
Industrial metal roof coating with liquid rubber.
Industrial metal roof coating with liquid rubber.

April 14, 2015: Roof Coating Crew Re-Attends to Site.

When we finished 70% of the roof last season the rain came in and lasted for days and then turned in to a snow storm so this roof had to be completed spring of 2015 when weather was suitable enough to apply liquid rubber.

9:50 am arrived on site.

We  arrived on site and we did our daily tool box meetings. We then did a site orientation with the engineering company who hired us. 11:00 am we got on the roof.  One of us started painting the ribs with Liquid Rubber while I started coating panels with Liquid Rubber. We coated about 1100 sq. ft. It took awhile due to the slope of the roof.  At the end of the job the customer looked over the work and was very happy.

2:10  pm leave site.

Workers ropes tied off on tin roof.
Workers ropes tied off on tin roof.
GRS Worker, applying Liquid Rubber.
GRS Worker, applying Liquid Rubber.
Finished Section of roof with Liquid Rubber Applied.
Finished Section of roof with Liquid Rubber Applied.
Roof Half finished with Liquid Rubber.
Roof Half finished with Liquid Rubber.
Close up of the liqid Rubber applied to roof.
Close up of the liquid rubber applied to roof.
  < End of Report >
CONTACT US
Call our 24 Hour Emergency Roof Repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5.
For all other areas of Canada call 1.877.497.3528 Toll Free.
We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Roof Eavestrough Repair and Waterproofing, June 3, 2015

ARTICLE: Eavestrough Repair Edmonton, Alberta. Installing Drip Edge for Proper Waterproofing at Fascia to Gutter Area. Installing Downspout Extensions for Drainage From Basement. Replace Damaged Downspouts.

Eavestrough Repair Edmonton. How to Maintain Your Eavestrough and Downspouts for Effective Building Envelope Water Proofing and Foundation Waterproofing. 

The scope of work for this work site covered a number of waterproofing essentials. The primary waterproofing issues that were fixed were:

1. Foundation Waterproofing. The objective being terminating water away from your foundation for proper drainage and extending the life span of your basement.

To effectively waterproof your basement you must have a yard that is sloped away from the basement and you must also terminate roof rain water away from the foundation of your building.

In this instance the crew installed downspout extensions to achieve the goal.

2. Building Envelope Waterproofing. A. The objective in this instance is for rain water coming down the slope of the roof to terminate in the eaves-trough and not run between the fascia and gutter. B. The secondary objective is to prevent ice dams that build up in gutters to creep up under the shingles and on to the roof deck causing deck rot and possibly leaks.

A. When water comes off the roof and misses the gutter and goes between the gutter and fascia it may cause problems with your foundation and may cause ice dam problems or water ingress in to your soffit area. This can rot out your roof assembly at the soffit and fascia area.

To correct this our crew installed roof eave edge drip flashing along the length of the eave deck sheathing. This will cause the rain water to terminate in the gutter instead of running between the gutter and fascia.

B. Installing drip edge will also help (nominally) ice dams not get to the sheathing and rot out the roof deck. For optimum waterproofing at the eave edge you would want to install ice and water membrane on the sheathing so that if the ice from the gutter gets up and under the shingles and over the drip edge and on to the sheathing and melts then the ice and water underlay will protect the sheathing and avoid leaks. In this example it was not in our scope of work.

May 21, 2015: Crew Attends Site for Eaves-trough Maintenance and Waterproofing Tasks.

Site Location: 16310 Stony Plain Road Edmonton, Alberta.

Location Type: Commercial, Institutional.

3:30 pm we arrived on site. Performed safety protocol and site meeting.

SCOPE OF WORK: We installed 80 feet of drip edge metal flashing along the south side of the building (by the side entry) as well as to the north side of the building. To install the drip edge flashing we used roofing nails to secure the drip edge flashing to the deck side of the eave edge of the roof to allow for water run-off to enter gutter. The problem the customer was experiencing was water running down the sloped roof and getting between the gutters and the fascia and not actually getting in to the gutters.

After that was complete the next scope of work was install downspout extensions and to build brackets out of wood to help the down pipes stay off the ground. The extensions will now run the water away from the foundation of the property. For the brackets we cut and measured pieces of wood to rest the down pipe on. Once these were built we painted them brown to match the down pipe.

We also had to replace two pieces of down pipe as they were damaged .

6 pm leave site.

Insatlled Drip edge
Installed drip edge flashing to ensure water got from sloped roof to gutter instead of running between roof edge and fascia.
wooden brackets we had to make for down pipe
Wooden brackets we had to make for down pipe. Water now terminates toward a slope and away from foundation for proper waterproofing.

Man hours:  7 hours Materials used: 10 pieces of metal drip edge. 2 down pipes that we replaced. 6  2 x 3 (boards) for downspout extensions. Spray paint for downspout extensions. 100 roof nails.

OTHER PHOTOS FROM JOB

< End of Report >
CONTACT US
Call our 24 Hour Emergency Roof Repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5.
For all other areas of Canada call 1.877.497.3528 Toll Free.
We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Roof Deck Drainage and Waterproofing

ARTICLE:  Roof Deck Drainage Problems. Waterproofing a 2 Ply SBS Modified Bitumen Roof Balcony in Edmonton, Alberta.

Recommendations for Waterproofing Outdoor Decks Over Conditioned Living Space. Roof Deck Drainage and Waterproofing - Inspection and Repair of a Torch-On Flat Roof on Outdoor Balcony at Multi-Family Condominium. Customers regularly call on us to have roof assessments (inspections) completed. During a roof assessment our journeyman roofers assess the roofs condition. We assess the roof for preventative maintenance reasons as well as inspecting existing problems that the customer is pointing out. We then discuss different scopes of work fix the problems as well as potential materials and costs related to the repairs. One of the most common calls we get for inspections and repairs are rooftop decks, balconies and patios. The primary reason the failure rate on rooftop decks is so high is because of the original installation. It is common for incorrect membrane choice to be the reason. In other words, many people install an outdoor deck membrane that is intended only for an outdoor deck and not a membrane for over a heated living space. If your rooftop deck or balcony is over a heated living area you require a special membrane that is also intended for low slope roofing (as well as deck waterproofing) and is approved for use over a conditioned living space. Common products for this are Dura-Deck or DecTec, both of which are a PVC membrane that are suitable to be walked on (so they do not require a floating deck over top) and they manufacture membranes suitable for over a conditioned living space. We use DecTec extensively and have had great results with it. Or, also common is the installation of a membrane that won't hold up to the foot traffic associated with outdoor living areas. Other reasons include simple age, wear and tear, drainage and issues relating to penetrations or floating deck assemblies on top of the membrane. Visit our main website for more information on rooftop deck waterproofing. This particular inspection and subsequent repairs was more focused toward an aging membrane and the associated repairs that come with not properly maintaining the deck membrane and building envelope over the years. The drainage problems were causing significant damage to the exterior of the building. Below you will find the inspection report. May 20, 2015: Journeyman Superintendent Attends for Balcony Inspection. Roof Inspection Location: 10245 116 Street NW Edmonton Alberta. Roof Inspection Date: May 20, 2015. Roof Type: SBS 2 Ply Modified Bitumen Torch-On Membrane on Roof Balcony. Site Location Type: Multi-Family Condominium.

This customer is experiencing a problem with water getting in the roof system and it draining out on a low corner and destroying some exterior brick work. In the area of the leak there are 2 laps of the SBS modified bitumen that have come apart.

Roof Deck Drainage damaging exterior of building. Edmonton, Alberta.
Roof Deck Drainage damaging exterior of building.
SBS Torch ON Seam Pealing back
SBS Torch-On lap pealing back.
SBS Torch on roof, seconf lap starting to come apart
SBS Torch on roof, second lap starting to come apart.
 

Scope: To repair this, degranulate the area and apply new torch-on stripping in and around the corner to seal in properly. Man hours: To complete 3 - 6. Material needed: 1 roll of SBS modified cap membrane.

The customer  would also like a quote for the following scope: to fill 13 pitch pockets on the roof and also seal the voids around pitch pockets with some detail sealer.

Area that needs sealing
Area that needs sealing at gutter to wall area.
Pitch Pockets that need filling
Pitch pockets at deck railing post termination area that need filling.
More seams on the sbs torch on roof that need to be sealed
More seams on the SBS torch-on roof that need to be sealed.

Man hours to complete = 10. Material needed: 4 gallons of portable sealer. 1 box of IKO MS Detail.

More Reading:
http://www.jlconline.com/decks/waterproofing-a-rooftop-deck.aspx
https://www.grscanadainc.com/Rooftop_Deck_Waterproofing.html
https://www.grscanadainc.com/DecTec_Deck_Waterproofing.html
http://www.dec-tec.com/
https://www.pinterest.com/generalroofing/dectec-deck-and-rooftop-waterproofing/
File to be updated when repair reports come in to office.
< End of report >
CONTACT US
Call our 24 Hour Emergency Roof Repair at 1.780.424.7663 Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5.
For all other areas of Canada call 1.877.497.3528 Toll Free.
We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.
 

Liquid Rubber, Tank Waterproofing June 3 2015

Article: Liquid Rubber - Tank Waterproofing. Killam, Alberta. Oil and Gas. Industrial.

Liquid rubber is a product that we use extensively on commercial and industrial metal roof systems and gutters to waterproof them from rain and ice damming.

Liquid rubber can also be used to waterproof foundations, canals, ponds, tanks, RV's, gutters, pipelines, park structures and has numerous other residential, commercial and industrial applications. Mining, oil and gas, marine and agricultural applications are numerous.

There are various grades of liquid rubber and it can be rolled, brushed or sprayed on.

This field report is from our liquid rubber crew that were waterproofing tanks at an oil and gas facility in Alberta.

For more information visit our main web site page on liquid rubber.

May 11, 2015: Liquid Rubber Waterproofing Crew Attends to Site. 930 am arrive on site. We started on tank one. One part of the crew started shoveling out the sand which was 2 feet deep in spots and preparing the tank and outer ring for rubber. Once they had the sand shoveled back and the entire outer ring exposed we the then cleaned it with wire brushes and cleaner - this process took the crew until 3 pm. At 3 pm we started to lay in the scrim sheet and apply liquid rubber to the tank and outer ring. This process took the crew to 5:30 pm. The other portion of the crew did the inside portion of the tank - the containment section of the tank. We had to clean all the dirt up and then began scrubbing the floors and around the penetrations and perimeter. This portion of the work was done at 130 pm. Once the containment area was clean we applied seam tape along the perimeter and around all penetrations. We also had to seal off the two corners using scrim sheet and liquid rubber. After that was done we used 3 ft x 1.5 ft strips of scrim sheet to seal the tank to the concrete floor. We then coated the entire floor and applied the coating up the walls one foot. This portion of the work scope was done at 430 pm. We then helped the other part of our crew finish the outer section of the tank The site is now 50% complete and will be finished tomorrow. Man hours on cleaning and prep scope so far is 19 man hours. Man hours logged on site in total today - 46 man hours with drive time Material used 2 pails of Liquid Rubber. 1/2 roll of 3 feet mesh. 1 box of rags. 1 gallon of cleaner. 4 brushes.
Liquid Rubber - Outer ring of tank cleared and coating applied to tank.
Liquid Rubber - Outer ring of tank cleared and coating applied to tank.
Liquid Rubber - mesh applied to edge of tank and concrete foundation.
Liquid Rubber - mesh applied to edge of tank and concrete foundation.
Liquid Rubber - coating applied to substrate (concrete foundation)
Liquid Rubber - coating applied to substrate (concrete foundation)
Liquid Rubber - Seam tape applied to penetrations.
Liquid Rubber - Seam tape applied to penetrations.
Liquid Rubber - preparation of site.
Liquid Rubber - preparation of site.
Liquid Rubber Waterproofing - Staff applying liquid rubber to outside of tank.
Liquid Rubber Waterproofing - Staff applying liquid rubber to outside of tank.
Liquid Rubber - mesh and liquid rubber applied to outer ring of tank.
Liquid Rubber - mesh and liquid rubber applied to outer ring of tank.

May 12, 2015: Crew attends for second day of work on site.

8 am arrive on site.

We started with prepping the outer portion of the tank and ring by cleaning the tank with cleaner and outer ring as well. There wasn't extensive prep time for this - it looked like someone did half of it for us (the cleaning wasn't in our original scope so our client likely had staff attend to this). After it was all prepped the crew sealed the tank to the outer ring with scrim sheet and then coated it with liquid rubber.

We then focused on the inner part of the tank and containment enclosure. We vacuumed the dirt and scrubbed the floor and tank. After that we used 6 inch and four inch seam tape to seal in all the penetrations and perimeter of enclosure (which isn't easy - it's really tight quarters).

After the seam tape was done we then vacuumed again. Once the area was clean we used scrimmage sheets to seal the tank to the concrete foundation essentially creating a tub. We then coated everything with brush.  The customer very satisfied with finally having a solution and our work.

3rd tank. At first our customer put the 3rd tank off and said they weren't doing it, but now they want it done and they estimate that it will be ready for next Thursday.

Total man hours for prep and cleaning was 31 hours.

Total hours spent on site including drive time 78 hours.

Material used today. 3 pails of LR 1 roll of scrim sheet 3 feet long. 1 roll of 6 inch scrim sheet. 1 roll of 6 inch seam tape. 1 roll of 4 inch seam tape. 1 box of rags. 2 gallon of splice wash. 8 paint brushes.

May 22, 2015: Crew Re-attends for Scope of Work on Tank 3. 

Scope of work for third tank:
  1. Clean tank and outer ring to white glove state apply LR and mesh to seal tank to outer ring.
  2. Inner containment area. Clean tank and floor seal the floor to tank and up wall of containment area
Man hours 40 with drive time Materials 1 roll of 3ft mesh 2 pails of LR brush grade Rags 1 gallon of splice wash 4 brushes

6:30 am left Edmonton. 9 am arrive on site. We started the first part of the crew on the inner containment area. We started by cleaning the area with splice wash. Once it was clean we then used seam tape to seal in the perimeter and used mesh to seal in tank to the concrete footing. Once that was complete we then coated it with Liquid Rubber.

The second part of the crew then focused on the the outer tank and ring. We cleaned it and shoveled out some dirt in areas to make it level. We then used 3 foot pieces of mesh to seal the outer ring to the tank. As we were applying our Liquid Rubber at 2:30 the other part of the crew came to help us out and finish this tank. It was 2 x the size of the other tanks so the outer portion took a bit longer.

Applying Liquid Rubber to outter ring
Applying Liquid Rubber to outer ring
Completed liquid Rubber job on outter ring of tank.
Completed liquid Rubber job on outer ring of tank.
  Other Photos:  
CONTACT US
Call our 24 Hour Emergency Roof Repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5.
For all other areas of Canada call 1.877.497.3528 Toll Free.
We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.
.

Edmonton Commercial Flat Roof Replacement, January 2015

This commercial client in Edmonton was presented with a quotation for a flat roof replacement. The report follows the crew as they performed the replacement over the course of several months. Scope of Work:
  • Scrape gravel down to existing 4 ply membrane and take down to dispose.
  • Supply and glue down a FR board (1/2 inch fiberboard adhered to a 95 gram sanded poly sheet) and seal all laps.
  • Supply and back torch a 180 gram armour bound peal and stick up walls and all penetrations.
  • Remove and replace any wet insulation.
  • Owners to move and re-position satellite and communication systems.
  • Clean all debris and haul away.
Roof Report, January 21, 2015:
We arrived on site at 2:10 pm and I got set up to continue with the cap stripping. At the same time we were waiting to see what was going to happen with the weather since it was still drizzling. I went through the safety paperwork and then we helped with removing the garbage from the roof and brought it to the bin. 20141212_14051920141212_195820 20141212_195807 20141212_140503 Roof Report, January 23, 2015: After our toolbox meeting we proceeded to install FR board on the upper mechanical roof and did so until the point of satellites in all directions. We then installed peel and stick stripping wherever possible and sopramastic waterproofing in all other protrusions.
Cleaned up and left site at 4:30pm.
20150123_140138 20150123_140146 20150123_140200 20150123_140209 20150123_155431 20150123_155440 20150123_155444 20150123_160117 20150123_160124 20150123_160130
Roof Report, February 12, 2015:
This morning after we were done with the safety reports, we went to the upper roof and continued with the base seal tie in. I had two other crew members remove snow from the entire upper roof while I started to install peel and stick on the curbs. After I was done with the curbs on the north side of the roof, I installed patches over the plates and installed gussets were there were none. I also found several spots that needed patches in the field and repaired as required.
Roof Report, February 14, 2015:
Started to lay in FR board where they moved the satellite towers. Once we got the base done on one I had a crew member start capping it in while myself and another crew member started to base in the next section. Both sections were capped by the end of the day which made the client happy. Then I stayed on site to complete fire watch.
20150214_013512_resized 20150214_022441_resized
Roof Report, February 18, 2015:
This morning we started on completing the NE corner of the roof by installing the last of the FR board. We also started sealing around the curbs and perimeter.
We then moved to the SW corner and completed the base tie in around the satellite and patched plate holes in the area. Fire watch from 3:30pm to 5:30pm.
IMGP2516 IMGP2517 IMGP2518 IMGP2519 IMGP2523 IMGP2527 IMGP2532
Roof Report, February 19, 2013: Once we got to the site we continued with the base tie in around the large curb and the parapet on the SW corner of the upper roof.
Roof Report, March 7, 2015: Today we completed the field cap and most of the DE granulating around the details. Roof Report, March 9, 2015:
Bill and me completed the cap stripping on the upper roof today and need to touch up the gum boxes and granules to finish the SBS on the upper roof. We then completed the curbs on the main roof and started to install the plumbing vents when it started to rain at 3 pm. I am not happy with the large ponding area on the east side of the main roof and would like permission to extend the sump on the east side with a trough through the high spot so that more water drains.  I would have to cut out the FR board from the sump about 1 ft. wide west about 10 ft. to where the water ponds 3 inches at the deepest point. Then tie in the old roof to new torch on roof through the trough. This would require 10 man hours and another roll of cap which would add another 2 years to the life of the cap in that area. Roof Report, March 10, 2015:
Today we installed 8 plumbing vents and touched up the existing plumbing vents with smag and granules. We completed the west drop drain install and reset the air units on the SW corner of the main roof. We then cleaned the entire main roof and downloaded all the garbage. Roof Report, March 11, 2015:
This morning we completed the touch ups on the gum boxes of the upper roof and then started installing the metal around the perimeter of the upper roof and found that we were short one length. On the far east side of the roof there looks to be another piece missing that would cover the electrical lines and 2-18 inch storm collars are gone as well. We installed all the metal that was there and added extra screws and smack pins to make them very solid.
Roof Report, March 12, 2015: After the weekly meeting in the morning we met up at Home Depot for caulking and then went to the site. We spent extra time on resetting all the wire tracks on the upper roof and finished off the storm collars with caulking as well. 2 of the 18 inch stacks still have no storm collars but we filled them with caulking anyway. With no metal flashing on the wall detail on the upper roof, we made sure that water would not pond there by completely filling the riglet with caulking. We downloaded the rest of the tools, rolls of base, and propane into the small trailer and parked it in the very NE corner of the parking lot.  The bin is still on site and will need to be removed.
Follow-up Inspection, August 19, 2015: Upon visual inspection of the roof. I noticed 6 different blisters had developed. Attached is a copy of a roof map that shows the approximate locations of the blisters. Continuing on we walked the entire roof, testing the membrane to make sure the insulation was properly adhered to the roof underneath. I would say that there is no issues with the adhesion. The following is a list of the repairs that should be made to said deficiencies:
  • A lack of chipping away at the existing roof that was re-roofed led to a ridge. We can either build it up around it, leveling it off, or cut it and patch it.
  • Run a patch to meet lapping requirements.
  • Pipes need to be patched.
  • Anchor fasten the flashing correctly to the wall. Ms detail to seal the flashing.
  • Replace with concrete paving stones and roof mate underneath, and have a drainage mat under the roof mate.
  • Run a drainage mat or roof mate.
  • Install storm collars and caulk them.
  • Have a flashing made up and installed.
  • Have a sheet metal cap fabricated and installed.
  • Install cap sheet, roof mate, drainage mat and paving stones.
  • Box it in with cap and quick prime.
20150819_135209 20150819_135233 20150819_135237 20150819_135341 r1 r2 r3 r4 r5 r6 r7 rrrrrr6
< End Report > CODE: 11834 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Edmonton Commercial Roof Deck Installation, March 2014

This commercial client in Edmonton required a Dec-Tec roofing installation by the GRS crew. Several decks are being installed on this site. This report follows the deck installations, however additional roofing work was completed on this site at a later time. Additional reports will be made for the subsequent work. Note: This report is text based and does not contain progress photos.
Roof Report, March 23, 2014: This morning we removed the old deck down to the substrate and found some rotten plywood in the corners which we will have to replace with 1/2 plywood. The entire perimeter will also need to be replaced with 3/8 plywood as it was coated with asphalt which is not compatible with this system. I need to alter the ordered slope package to include a drain. I cut some wires while prepping the wall, so I am going to need some heavy rubber gloves, wire strippers and some heat shrink wrap. We removed the roof until 4 pm and download garbage until 7 pm. Materials Required:
  • 11 pieces of 8 ft. drip edge.
  • 5 pieces of  3/8 plywood.
  • 3 pieces of 1/2 plywood.
  • 10 short sawsall wood blades.
  • 1 roll of garbage bags.
  • 3 drains.
  • 3 scuppers.
  • An industrial heater (for dec patch and gluing).
  • Heavy rubber gloves.
  • Wire strippers.
  • Heat shrink wrap.
Roof Report, March 24, 2014: I got the crew going in the morning and then went to the landfill. Once I returned I started on repairing the wires that I cut the day before. I realized that there was a lot more damage to the wires and I had to go back to home depot for more supplies. Once I fixed the wires and the crew fixed the substrate we then had a hard time fitting in the drip edge behind the building membrane. An important note about the decks is that they will have to be insulated from underneath. Vapour barrier needs to placed on top of the ceiling drywall to ensure an energy efficient building. This should not be that much extra for them since the ceiling drywall is damaged in those areas. I am thinking I could use another crew member to assist with this site. We may also require an electrician to assist with the wiring.
Roof Report, March 26, 2014:
Once I got to site this morning I knew I had to fix the back slope of the substrate on the west side.  The electricians showed up at 10:15 am and fixed the wiring on the roof.  The power is working and their repair is to code. We finished the slope repair and then went to drop off the sliding door screen for repair, and pick up the slope package from Plastifab.  Unfortunately the package we picked up turned out to be the wrong size. I am going to get the guys to remove and download the floating deck until I come back with the right slope package.
Roof Report, March 28, 2014:
We completed the slope package and the install of 5/8 plywood. During the process I saw the need for light gauge 90 degree metal to minimize gaps around the perimeter. Short of the scupper which we should have by noon tomorrow, we are ready for the dec patch and heaters. Tomorrow we will start with relocating the scupper from the outside and if time and weather permits, tarp and start on the removal of the the next deck in the NW corner until the proper size scuppers arrive. We would have started on these items but high wind in the afternoon made our next set up too hazardous.

Roof Report, March 29, 2014:
We started the day with the repair of some installed screws and then sanded the laps in the 5/8 plywood dec-tec substrate. We also installed caulking and dec-tec kick under the patio door and window. At 12 pm we then started to tarp off the area around the next deck and began removal. This area has been damaged by water for some time and is full of mold.  We may have some framing issues as the original substrate has been water damaged as well. I strongly suggest that the drywall on the ceilings and walls under this deck be completely removed to check for water damage and mold. The proper installation of insulation and vapor barrier under the deck above the ceiling drywall is necessary as well. There is also the issue of the siding as it has been cut as high as 4 ft in some places. We need to consult the client about what they want done for this. It will look a little strange if I bring my membrane that high. We should find out if they want the same type of siding installed (which would require all of the siding to be redone), or if they would prefer a different type of siding.
Roof Report, April 15, 2014:
This morning we had to work on fixing an area that wrinkled while we were installing the dec-tec. Bringing up the membrane even 12 inches is making the install difficult. There is 15.5 inches of unfinished wall that will have to be completed when the other siding is installed.
Roof Report, April 16, 2014:
We continued with installing the second dec-tec today, short of a couple of pieces to finish. I had to put a patch over the scupper because of dripped glue. Tomorrow I will be finishing the seal on the second deck and down loading the tools from there. We should be done the second dec-tec installation by 10 or 11 am tomorrow morning, short of one lap that I need the 90 degree tool for. Then it will be ready for the Tyvek building paper and the scupper box install. All of the deck areas above the metal cap flashing need to be patched of holes that we put in to build the temporary roofs. This should take us a half a day and the repair of the back wall should take 2 days. I still need to take the trailer to the dump one last time, but I am waiting till the end of the job to do that. We have some matching downspout pipe and 90's for the drainage so there will be no extra cost to us moving the scupper from the original location. I have already bought the matching paint for the scupper boxes.
Roof Report, April 17, 2014:
Today we finished off the dec-tec and installed building wrap to the substrate walls to ensure no water gets into the system. Most of the upper area that is not covered by the membrane is 10 inches and the open area by the scupper is 15.5 inches.
The lowest part of the membrane is 12 inches off the field which is at the peak of the slope package. We worked on the membrane until 12:30 pm and then started to secure the roof and download the most important tools. I will drop off the mountain of receipts and paperwork some time this weekend. Depending on the weather when I go back to Edmonton, I may need to pick up some heaters again.

< End Report > CODE: 11618 Contact Us
Call our 24 hour emergency roofing repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Edmonton Emergency Roof Repair, July 2012

This client called into GRS' line to have an emergency dispatch crew to their roof so that they might lay down some tarps and prevent further water ingress. We arrived to put down tarping, and discussed repair options with the client from there. Our crew received the emergency dispatch to the address provided, and loaded the truck with necessary tarping materials to cover the problem area(s) on the roof. Work was difficult as the roof structure's condition was hazardous to work on. The tarping was laid down eventually, and the team left shortly before 5:00pm (two hour job).
emergency
Missing shingles and exposed roof boards had culminated into a significant puncture in the roof structure.
IMAG0100
Parts of the structure had been exposed. In particular, the seams where the roof boards meet underneath the failing shingle system are completely exposed.
IMAG0103
Although the conditions were hazardous, we completed a full inspection to provide repair options for the client.
IMAG0104
After finishing up the spot repairs, we put a tarp over all of the problem areas.
< End Report > CODE: 14604 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Edmonton Liquid Rubber Roof Replacement, April 2012

This post reflects the field reports of a GRS crew attending to a client's re-roofing request. At the onset, it would appear that they would like to explore Tough Roof or a liquid rubber system.
The homeowners at this location are in the midst of a complete remodel and are looking to eliminate all problems with their roof. Though smaller repairs could be made, it looks like they would like to replace the roof outright. After explaining the systems available to them, they appear most interested in Tough Roof or a liquid rubber system.
  Scope of the Work:
  • Sealants and tie-ins are dried, non-malleable, and cracking.
  • The drainage appears to be good. No clogs, No pooling.
  • The parapet walls consist of capping only.
  • Building structure interior and exterior appear solid
  • The current tar and gravel roof is splitting - there is no sponginess. Blistering was found in 2 areas, with the larger of the two nearly punctured.
  • Christmas Light holders have been screwed into the capping above the windows, this will have to be replaced.
100_1032 100_1033 100_1034 100_1035 100_1036 100_1037 100_1038 100_1039 100_1040 100_1041
  Update (May 30, 2012): We advised the client that roof preparation would commence the following day for the engineered liquid rubber application. Update (May 31, 2012):
After picking up some equipment from another job, the crew arrived on site for 9:20am, ready to begin preparing the roof for liquid rubber application. The gravel had to be removed first, followed by a thorough power washing to remove all possible debris from the roof. This took up the bulk of the day, but they received some extra assistance between 3:30 and 5:30 from another pair of crew members after they'd completed another job. Everyone on the main team departed at 6:30pm.
Update (June 1st, 2012): The crew returned to the job site for ~10:00am and continued pressure washing the roof and preparing it for the spray-on liquid rubber. They departed again for 2:30, having completed the preparations. Liquid rubber was then applied to the roof in what is called a 'flood coat'. The crew cited that the single coat was appropriate, and that another wouldn't be necessary. Update (June 13, 2012): The client called us to advise that a leak had developed at the skylight and that regardless of rain quantity, it appeared 'random' in how much water would seep through, and at what rate. The leak began after the Christmas lights were removed from the screw-in fixtures atop the window capping. The responding team went back up onto the roof and determined that the caulking around the windows was correctly applied. They concluded that there was no damage to the roof or fault in the liquid rubber application; the leak must be a problem with the window itself.   IMG_1858 IMG_1859 IMG_1860 IMG_1861 IMG_1862 IMG_1863 IMG_1864 IMG_1865 IMG_1866 IMG_1867 IMG_1868 IMG_1869 IMG_1870 IMG_1871 IMG_1872 IMG_1873      
image-1image-2image-3image-4image-5image
        Update (August 12, 2012): The client reached out to us again that the window is continuing to leak, and that they would like us to look at the flashing  on the roof where the Christmas lights had been screwed into. This recent bout of poor weather saw more water leaking in beyond a spot or two.   Update (August 28, 2012): The crew made it out to the client's location for further, more extensive repairs and safeguarding. They arrived at 9:15, and removed water from the roof, blow drying it clear as well. The capping metal was replaced and screwed down, and a trowel installed to the roof connection. After that, they installed scrim sheeting just before more rain came in. They had to leave the site between 4:30 and 6:30pm due to weather, but returned to tarp the site walls for an over-spray of more liquid rubber. Another coat was started, and the team continued to work until 8:15pm when more rain came rolling in. Tarps were left in place with the client's blessing, and the team promised their return in the morning.   Update (September 19, 2012): Once again, we arrived on location to address the area around the skylight/windows. Our crew member found a few holes and cracking that required repair. They were patched with seam tape and more liquid rubber. This repair took a mere hour and a half; crew departed site after that.     20140918_080905_resized 20140918_080910_resized 20140918_080957_resized 20140918_081004_resized 20140918_091942_resized 20140918_091953_resized 20140918_093327_resized 20140918_093341_resized 20140918_093349_resized   CODE: 4722 Contact Us 24 Hour Emergency Roof Repair. Telephone: 1.403.873.7663. Email: info@calgaryroofrepair.ca. Mailing: 240 – 70 Shawville Boulevard SE Calgary, Alberta. T2Y 2Z3. For all other areas of Canada call 1.877.497.3528 Toll Free. We service all areas of southern and central Alberta and south east British Columbia including Airdrie, Banff, Calgary, Canmore, Crossfield, Carstairs, Didsbury, Olds, Sundre, Three Hills, Drumheller, Hanna, Brooks, Bassano, Strathmore, Chestermere, Irricana, Cochrane, Black Diamond, Okotoks, Priddis, Bragg Creek, Cranbrook, Fernie, Panorama, High River, Vulcan, Medicine Hat, Lethbridge, Taber, Sylvan Lake, Red Deer and other Alberta rural points between.

Edmonton Residential Roof Leak Repair, March 2011

This report outlines a relatively small repair on a residential roof that had been leaking water. The eight penetration vents and stacks on the roof were not installed properly and needed to be attended to. An estimate was sent by our project manager and subsequently approved by the client. Following that, the crew headed to the site to perform the repairs. The crew had to lift the surrounding shingles from each penetration and re-seal in order to waterproof. The shingles then needed to be placed back in their original positions. From start to finish the repairs only took about 4 hours time. DSC01706 DSC01707 DSC01708 DSC01709 DSC01710 DSC01711 DSC01712 DSC01713 DSC01714 < End Report > CODE: 48 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Roof Retrofitting in Unity SK, August to October 2010

Below you will find a series of Roof Reports and photos from our roofing repair crew in Unity, Saskatchewan. The client asked us to perform some retrofitting and approved some assessments that were made on-site. Roof retrofitting and leak mitigation was provided.

Roof Report, August 24 2010:

We opened one ventilation unit which was found to have traces of moisture. It was water-tested, which came back positive as a leak area. We also found areas that had open wire penetrations and gas lines going into the building. A cut-test was also performed, where 4-ply styrofoam insulation (5") and a vapour barrier was found. This might explain why water had to travel some distance before it appeared as a leak, since the rest of the roof is in good shape. Areas requiring maintenance were sealed with mash, mastic and additional caulking as required. Client Callback, October 21 2010: After TPO recovery, the client found more water leaking at grade-level. We resolved the issue with caulking around the problem area. < End Report > Code: 120 Contact Us Call our 24 Hour Emergency Roof Repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. For all other areas of Canada call 1.877.497.3528 Toll Free. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.