Commercial Roofing Maintenance in Edmonton AB, January 2011 and May 2014

Below you will find field reports and project management notes from our Edmonton roofing repair crew responding to maintenance calls for an ongoing commercial real estate client.  Maintenance Call, January 20 2011:
Further to the situation at our other property, we have received confirmation that the owner has completed all he can do for snow removal at this site. As per our conversation, we would like a site assessment and quotation. This information will then be forwarded to the owner for a final decision.
Post-Repair Report, January 17 2011: There was water in the roof drain, but we noticed the down-pipe was frozen solid. Water was forced out of the pipe near the top of the wall and caused lots of ice to form against it. Ice melt was spread out around the pipe and drain. The drain pipe should be removed and thawed, or otherwise replaced completely. A tenant on the ground floor unit told us there might be as many as four units in this block (northeast corner) that have roof leaks. We should schedule a meeting with the building superintendent so he can let us in to see where they are. January 18 2011: We were shown three other units that reported leaks. Only one on the southwest corner was an actual leak caused by a frozen drain pipe. The leak on the northeast corner that we worked on yesterday has stopped. The owner also inquired about pricing for snow removal. January 19 2011: The owner has advised us that he will be cleaning the snow off the roof himself. Post-inspection indicates that there are many potential issues that will come about during the spring thaw. The roof will like experience failures during this time. The drain pipe should also be replaced. The client called us back a couple of years later inquiring about a roof replacement. We have attached notes from the project manager as well, detailing his recommendations, pros, and cons of each system. Quotation, May 15 2014:
  • Complete roof replacement options:
    • Spray foam only (+ top coating - polyurea, liquid rubber, or EPDM)
    • EPDM
    • TPO or PVC
    • 2-ply SBS modified bitumen (torch-on)
    • 4-ply engineered liquid rubber roof
    • TOUGH ROOF
  • Sustainable Roofing - Roof Recovery
    • Spray foam only (+ top coating - polyurea, liquid rubber, or EPDM)
    • EPDM
    • TPO or PVC
    • 2-ply SBS modified bitumen (torch-on)
    • 1-ply coat tar
    • 2-ply engineered liquid rubber
Project Manager Recommendations This roof appears to be a candidate for any of the systems above. Although we can perform repairs or a complete re-conditioning (maintenance), we cannot guarantee any probability of material performance or success (beyond our Lifetime Workmanship Guarantee, automatically included with any work we do). I will preface my personal recommendations with a list of important things to remember when reviewing roof system choices:
  1. All low slope roof membranes on the market are "good products" - performance depends on who installs the system, the quality of roof assembly components, and geographical area.
  2. All roof membranes have similar life-cycle expectancy and associated costs.
  3. All roof membranes will provide excellent protection over many years if maintained properly.
  4. GRS installs all different system types. Not every roofing contractor can or does install them, so personal bias can play a role in recommendations.
  5. All low slope roof systems have pros and cons.
Two of my personal recommendations for colder Canadian climates are the 2-ply SBS torch-on and the single-ply EPDM. We are discovering that EPDM achieves one of our highest probabilities of success. It has consistent performance, price point, and ease of maintenance (provided it is fully adhered and not ballasted). SBS is also widely used and has performed consistently in Western Canada. In addition to the roof membrane, if you require added R value I would consider adding roof insulation boards or a spray-foam with a liquid rubber. Polyurea or EPDM as a covering. As noted above, one of our recommendations is the single ply roofs. Of the single plys, I recommend EPDM over TPO and PVC as TPO and PVC are heat welded and technician error can play into the integrity of seaming. GRS has many hundreds of thousands of square feet on hundreds of buildings with fully adhered EPDM performing exceptionally well across Western Canada. FYI: ballasted EPDM can be a nuisance to maintain as the rock ballast becomes a significant landscaping endeavour, so we choose to fully-adhere EPDM when possible. And finally are the Tough Roof, 4-ply tar and gravel, and the 4-ply liquid rubber options. Tar and gravel (and torch-n) have been used successfully in Western Canada for a number of decades now. They do, however, use an open flame or kettle and the SBS modified torch-on also has seams that can be problematic if the torch applicator is not highly skilled. The Tough Roof system is a great system that in some instances could be considered over-kill and the 4-ply liquid rubber system can be problematic if installing outside of perfect summer conditions. A note specifically to the spray foam SPF roofing - we have experienced a number of roof failures in colder climates due to the top coat cracking and peeling when not applied properly and to the recommended thickness. Many roofing companies are pricing SPF roofing in such a way that it is difficult for them to be profitable applying the top-coat at a proper thickness. If not applied correctly, the spray foam elastomeric or polyurea coatings are prone to cracking and peeling. Water then penetrates the foam and gets in-between the existing roof system and foam, then runs, and then we have to replace the roof as there is no way to get the water out between the systems. A properly applied polyurea spray coat, liquid rubber spray coat, or EPDM membrane solves that problem. With spray foam (specifically in Canada) we prefer to cover it with EPDM primarily, and if not with EPDM then liquid rubber. We prefer to not use the standard polyurea or reflective elastomerics. Additional notes for consideration:
  1. Skylights are not included in pricing unless otherwise noted.
  2. If structure is experiencing condensation prior to renovation or does in future - a repair, recovery, replacement, or any work done by GRS under this contract is not guaranteed to alleviate condensation issues.
  3. GRS is not responsible for the structure currently or in future experiencing any deflecting, warping, or settling. GRS is not responsible to assess or advise toward engineering issues. If you have any concern about the engineering of the building, please check with an engineer in advance of any roofing work commencing.
  4. Due to the nature of low slope roofing and although all care and attention is expected by the crews at work, GRS is not responsible for water ingress that may result during construction or retro-fitting of a low-slope or “flat roof” system.
< End Report > Code: 153 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Edmonton Liquid Rubber Roof Replacement, September 2012

This commercial client had various water leak issues on his rooftop including water ponding which had damaged the membrane. The roof was a candidate for the replacement or recovery option and the client decided to go ahead with a full liquid rubber replacement. After two inspections the following emails were sent between our project manager (italicized) and the client:
Good afternoon,
After our second and more thorough inspection, GRS feels it would be in your best interest to do a Full Roof replacement over Recovery.
A Recovery (retro-fit, overlay, re-covering) involves covering an existing flat roofing system with a new roof membrane. This process requires removal of all wet, damaged, or deteriorating roof insulation prior to the new roof being installed.
The main concern with a Recovery System is that your roof is currently leaking and the large amount of ponding water. This means the roof membrane may be totally damaged and a Full Roof replacement will suit you best.
In addition, when the current roof membrane has been saturated 30% or more we typically suggest a full roof replacement.
After our second inspection, we estimate that the roof is most likely saturated at around 15%.
At this level of saturation we can still proceed with a recovery system, however if we miss any insulation that is saturated, with the Liquid Rubber Recovery over top it creates condensation and the Liquid Rubber will bubble and possibly crack. If you decide to do a recovery system, we may have to come back for a few repairs meaning you may have future leaks. In the end it is more of a on-going problem for you and us. These visits will be free of charge as our recovery systems warranty applies.
For full roof replacement we still encourage our 4 ply Engineered Liquid Rubber System as we have had the most success with the product.
Today, customers trust significant roof asset management, repairs, and projects to GRS which include some of the largest commercial and industrial roofs in the world.
What sets us apart is an industry leading Lifetime Workmanship Guarantee and our commitment to core values. Old-fashioned hard work, customer service and honesty, customer education, superior property stewardship, an unwavering position toward safe work, and a passion for pinnacle roof craftsmanship are examples of values we hold. These build trust with customers, a strong company culture, and great character in roofers who enjoy a job well done. Any further questions or concerns I will assist you as you require.
 Thanks for the Consideration! Greatly Appreciated.
 General Roofing Systems.
Hi, I guess we need to proceed with a roof replacement with liquid rubber. Is this possible this year? Thank you.
Good morning, The 4 Ply Liquid Rubber Roof Replacement is strongly recommended. Great choice, the Liquid Rubber Roof is our most successful membrane.
We can complete this roof this year. Do you have any other questions? If you decide to carry through with this scope of work I will compile a work order for you to sign. Thanks for the consideration.
Initial condition of the rooftop: 1 2 3 4
Plumber's Report: Friday we had a plumber and mechanical technician attend the site to disconnect and move AC units and to lower the drain for adequate drainage of the roof.
The plumber informed me that the acting drain on your roof was actually the main vent for all your plumbing and could not be used as a drain as this does not adhere to the current building code. There is going to have to be a new drain installed on your roof to bring the roof up to code. We can finish the roof and install the drain once we are complete or at a later date but this leaves your roof without adequate drainage and could potentially create large problems. If you would like us to proceed I will get a quote from the plumber and a change order will have to be processed outlining the costs and will have to be approved and signed by you prior to the drain being installed. Our Journeyman red-seal roofer has informed me that upon the event of a flash flood/torrential downpour water will inevitably reach the flashing level and at this point water will seep into the roof system, causing the roof to fail. Thank you.
Roof Report, September 13, 2012:
  • Ripped off roof and cleaned it.
  • Removed skylight and put it back on again after taking off the sheet metal and flashing.
  • We put plastic cement around the vents.
  • Put on ice and water shield.
  • Job will be 100 percent done in another 2 days roughly.
Today a safety officer showed up at the job site and asked for the safety documents. Mike was there and he handled the situation very well, The safety officer asked us to install hooks to the roof for each person who is going to be working on the roof. We did what he asked for and he inspected to see if it was done proper. We were given the okay to carry on with the job. Roof Report, September 16, 2012: Materials dropped off on site in the morning and half of the ISO was already removed. After lunch all of the ISO had been removed and the crew was beginning to install the fiber board. Once half of the fiber board is down, one of the crew members will begin laying fabric. We should be at the spraying point by 4 or 5pm today. If the LR install is complete tonight the only thing remaining will be the re-connection of the AC units and the duct work. The new drain is to be put in on Monday pending the customers decision. A second coat may also be applied if necessary.
  • Laid and mechanically fastened ISO to entire roof area 5 screw and plates per 4'x4' sheet.
  • Coated ISO and backside of fiber board with liquid rubber for installation.
  • Installing fabric with rolled on LR (fabric 80%).
  • Patched holes in field temporarily with fabric and highbuild 200.
  • Attempted to spray but ran out of daylight.
Edmonton-20120916-00164 Edmonton-20120916-00165 Edmonton-20120916-00166 IMG-20120916-00163
Roof Report, September 17, 2012:
  • Finished 20% of fabric and rolled on LR.
  • We put high-build and mesh underneath flashing.
  • We put fabric and high-build around curbs.
  • LR coating on the entire roof.
  • Installed plumbing vents and roof jacks.
AC units and electrical are not connected. Plumber will be on site tomorrow to do the plumbing part. HVAC is not connected (duct not hooked back up). photo (1)photo (3)photo (4)photo (5)photo (6)photo (7)photo (8)photo (9)photo (10)photo (11) Extra Costs (associated with AC units): Our project manager sent the following email to the client:
Hi, I am writing this email to inform you of extra costs incurred on the project. Due to the age and positioning of the AC units on the roof they had to be completely disconnected and moved to install the roof system properly. Also while our mechanical contractors were on site disconnecting the AC and electrical, they requested they lower the drain on your roof to allow for adequate drainage. The plumber informed us the drain in current use was not a drain at all but the main vent for the plumbing of the building. Vents being used as drains is no longer accepted and is contrary to current building codes. This being said to bring the roof up to code and to be able to put the roof under warranty the drain simply had to be installed. I will get a change order for the additional costs sent over from our office for you to sign and send back, just sending this email as a courtesy to explain the extras so you don't feel in the dark. Thank You.
Roof Report, September 18, 2012:  
  • AC units connected and placed in original position.
  • Proper roof drain was installed.
  • Perimeter cant was brushed with highbuild 200 and meshed.
  • Entire roof was coated with brushed on LR.
  • AC units duct work reconnected.
  • Temporary anchor screws were siliconed and left as there was no drill on site.
 
photo (23) photo (24) photo (25) photo (26)
< End Report > CODE: 13030 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Edmonton Industrial Flat Roof Replacement, September 2012

This industrial client required a full flat roof replacement with additional work attached to the project. This included painting of vents and painting of the frames that run the perimeter of the building.  Roof Report, September 18, 2012: The crew arrived and began removing the gravel from the rooftop as well as loading the materials into the site area. photo (12) photo (13) photo (14) photo (15) photo (16) photo (17) photo (18) photo (19) Roof Report, September 19, 2012: The crew returned the next day and tore off an area 16 square ft. wide. They then cleaned the roof and covered it ensuring that everything was water proof. photo (27) photo (28) photo (30) photo (31) photo (32) photo (33) photo (36) photo (37) photo (38) photo (39) Roof Report, November 6, 2012: The crew attended the site and installed all of the flashing while also removing any unwanted metal from the rooftop.
photo (1) photo (2) photo (3) photo (4) photo (5) photo
  The client reached out to us regarding the time line of the roof membrane installation. The following emails are between our project manager (italicized) and the client: Are we planning to attempt something tomorrow?  Need to give status of repair job plans by 8AM as they will be bugging me again.  Just to recap they will be asking for more detail on repair job as time stretches on and more detail on backup plans if weather stays cool and wet until snow falls.
Hi, To complete the roof membrane portion we require the roof to be dry on top for at least 24 hours. As such, the weather will determine what day that occurs. Based on the forecast our scheduling is for this Wednesday or Thursday. If for some reason we cannot accomplish this task before freeze up then we will hoard. However, in all our experience with this product we have never had to, we have always, every year completed all scheduled sites before freeze up. The material can be applied to - 10 celcius which gives us ample time. After we have completed the last coat we then have to do metal which can be done in any temperature. When we consulted the manufacturer about the recent moisture after spraying it was made evident that there were a few isolated areas that did not have time to cure and of course moisture penetrated. Also we were advised that any existing moisture in the system would manifest in the form of a blister. If no blisters are present after completion we are good to go. If present, we cut that section out and replace. Thanks.
This article may be updated at a later date. < End Report > CODE: 1515 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.