Flat Roof Replacement Edmonton. June 10, 2015.

Article: SBS Modified Bitumen Torch-On Residential Flat Roof Replacement Edmonton, Alberta.

We pride ourselves in quality residential and commercial flat roof repair and replacement. Having quality journeyman roofers ensures our work is always top quality. The  following installation report is a SBS Modified Bitumen Torch-On Residential Flat Roof Replacement in Edmonton, Alberta. May 14, 2015: Flat Roof Crew Arrives to Start Re-Roof. 7:30 am arrive on site. We started the day with our tool box meetings. We then set up ladder and brought all tools needed for job up to roof. We started removing the metal flashing from perimeter of roof. We also began shoveling gravel in to rows. Once all the gravel was off the roof, we then started to rip up the old roof. Once we had the old roof half ripped up the trailer was full so we did a dump run. We also stopped at Home Depot to pick up some 5/8 plywood for re-sheathing. Once back on site we filled the trailer again and then swept the roof. We had to re-sheath two areas; one on the east side of roof and one on the south side of the roof. Both were 4 ft x 8 ft sections, so 64 sq. ft. total. Once we had that done, we then layered in our fiber board (FR board). We  mechanically fastened the FR board to the roof using screws and plates. I then started torching while the other guys continued to screw in plates and start peal and stick on the perimeter. We managed to get the base sheet done 95%. There is just one small section left to torch (of the base sheet portion).
Flat Roof Replacement Edmonton - Old flat roof membrane stripped to substrate.
Flat Roof Replacement Edmonton - Old flat roof membrane stripped to substrate.
Rotten substrate boards from roof leaks need to be replaced.
Rotten substrate boards from roof leaks need to be replaced.
Old flat roof materials removed. Roof drainage scupper shown in photo.
Old flat roof materials removed. Roof drainage scupper shown in photo.
New sheathing replaces rotted roof boards.
New sheathing replaces rotted roof boards.
Photo shows the first layer of FR Board gwith SBS base sheet on it going down on sheathing.
Photo shows the first layer of FR Board gwith SBS base sheet on it going down on sheathing.
Section of rotted roof boards that had to be cut out.
Section of rotted roof boards that had to be cut out.
Screws and plates shown in FR board and base sheet.
Screws and plates shown in FR board and base sheet.
Roof drain installation.
Roof drain installation.
Base layer with FR Board and SBS Base Sheet completed.
Base layer with FR Board and SBS Base Sheet completed.
  May 8, 2015: Crew attends for day two of flat roof replacement. We got to site and finished torching in the base. Once the base was complete we had to take off the 2 bottom rows of siding because the coating on the back of it was highly flammable. Once it was off, we also had to use peal and stick to seal of the siding so no flames would enter in behind. After this was done we started capping. By the end of the day we got 80% of the field capped. By late afternoon the wind was too strong and kept blowing out torch so we left site at 5 pm.
Roof replacement in progress - SBS cap sheet being installed.
Roof replacement in progress - SBS cap sheet being installed.
Installed SBS modified cap sheet and roof drain.
Installed SBS modified cap sheet and roof drain.
 

May 19: Crew Arrives for Day 3 Completion. We finished the roof capping on the field area of roof and started our cap stripping. Once all the stripping was complete, we started our fire watch. We also put all the metal and siding back on. Site is now 100% complete and customer is happy with the work we did.

Completed Photo of SBS Torch on Roof
Completed photo of SBS Torch on cap sheet on field area. Some detail work remaining with siding etc.
Visit our main website for more information on flat roof replacement.
CONTACT US
Call our 24 Hour Emergency Roof Repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5.
For all other areas of Canada call 1.877.497.3528 Toll Free.
We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.
 
 
Code: 9012

Residential Shake to Shingle Re-Roofing Fort Saskatchewan, AB – May to June 2014

Shake to Shingle Re-Roofing Fort Saskatchewan. Below you will find a quotation, field report, and photos for a residential re-roofing. The client needed a sloped roof replacement with respect to their shingles. Quotation, May 6 2014:
  • Sloped roof replacement (remove cedar shakes and replace with shingles)
    • Shingle options:
      • Architectural
      • Luxury slate/shake
      • Metal, rubber, shake, tile
    • Attic ventilation and assessment; vent correction as required
    • High profile shingle cap
    • Ice & Water protection: eaves, valleys, neck tie roof openings (vents, plumbing, skylights, etc.)
    • Complete wrap of roof underlayment
    • Storm nailing and installation
    • Caulking under vents, exposed nails, valleys, etc.
    • Replacement of rotted roof sheathing up to 100 sq. ft.
Work Order, June 4 2014:
  • Scope: Re-roof house, attached garage, and small rear shed
Materials
  • Field Shingles - 33 Sq of Malarkey Legacy Antique Brown Shingles (129 Bundle at 4 bundle sq)
  • Cap Shingles - 100 lineal ft of  Malarkey product number 224 - EZ Ridge 10" to be set up over the ridge vent strips at ridge of roof
  • Starter Shingles - 300 lineal feet of starter (whichever is recommended with Malarkey Legacy Shingles)
  • Eave drip edge - 140 lineal feet of color drip edge metal to be installed at eave of roof roof sheathing
  • Ridge Vent - 60 lineal feet of Lo-Omni Ridge vent is 9" wide for install under the Malarkey EZ Ridge 10" shingle
  • Plumbing Boots - 3 neoprene or plastic
  • Goose Necks - 2 colored goose-necks with-out baffle (screen only)
  • Valley Metal - 100 lineal feet of coloured valley metal for open metal roof valleys
  • Underlay -  31 square of synthetic breathable underlay choice GAF-Elk Deck Armour
  • Ice and Water - 240 lineal feet of 44" ice and water
Specifications
  • Inspection of attic space - check intake air at soffits to ensure insulation is not covering intake air that cools the attic.
  • Check exhaust venting at ridge to check if it is clear and calculate proper exhaust required for attic size - approximately 1 sq foot of exhaust venting is required for every 100 - 300 sq ft of roof attic space to properly ventilate the attic.
  • Check insulation for moisture damage. Damaged insulation will not work anymore (it will have no R Value) and must be removed.
  • Inspect sheathing for water damage.
  • Flashing all along the eaves-trough.
  • Rake-flashing along all rakes/gables.
  • Ice & Water along all eaves, valleys, flashing edges after sheet metal installation, back pans, and penetrations. Ice and water membrane is used to keep freeze thaw ice in the gutters from wicking back up and under shingles and warming at the sheathing and creating a roof leak in to the home.
  • Replace all vents and bathroom exhausts, with optional ridge venting included.
  • Supply and install metal back-pan for chimney.
  • Replace all goose-neck vents.
  • Replace all vents and exhausts with rubber-sealed screws instead of shingle nails at exposed areas (regular shingle nails can work back out of sheathing over time and can leak because the nails are exposed and caulking them will over time fade).
  • Storm-nail all shingles. Storm nailing shingles requires six nails vs. four nails in to each shingle.
  • Re-caulk storm collars and rain-caps with polybitumen or high grade polymer caulking (tar caulking will crack). Using a high quality UV resistant caulking in roofing is important.
  • Clean all gutters and downspouts.
  • Dispose of all materials, and full cleanup with magnetic roller so that no roofing nails are left in grass to hurt household pets or children playing.
image (1) image   The work order was approved, and we proceeded to drop off materials at the site on June 16 2014. Weather conditions were not very favourable for the next few days. Field Report, June 20 2014: We arrived on site to be met with tearing cedar shake. There were thousands of nails to remove, which took hours. It began raining today as well. Hopefully there will be more luck with the weather soon. IMG_20140620_083149 IMG_20140620_083153 IMG_20140620_083159 IMG_20140620_083201 IMG_20140620_083224 IMG_20140620_153707 IMG_20140620_153710   < TO BE CONTINUED > Code: 43 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Edmonton EPDM Roof Replacement, May 2011

Below you will find a series of reports pertaining to a residential client in need of some work to their roof. They sought an EPDM installation with some retro-fitting/installation of skylights, gutters, and downpipes. After receiving our quotes for services to be tendered, the client was interested in an EPDM re-roof with some additional features to be installed during the project (skylights, gutters, downpipes). Our quote, however, assumed that insulation would need to be entirely removed and replaced, which was not the case. We re-quoted the job (with minimal insulation work) and advised the client on the warranties available for materials and workmanship. Assessment, April 29 2011:
We arrived at the client's house to assess the building and existing roof system so that we might come to a better understanding of the scope of the work to be completed. We came up with some notes, and sent them to the client for review:
1. In terms of scheduling, we are held up on a commercial site that may put us a number of days off May 2, 2011 will keep [the client] abreast. As soon as they are off the job they will be ready to begin this project - likely Wednesday or Thursday [May 2nd or 3rd].
2. The disposal bin: when the truck goes up onto the lawn and unloads/loads the bin, there could be some damage to the lawn and beds by the sidewalk. We will do what we can to alleviate, but it is of concern.
3. In terms of scope, here is what we are ordering and planning for;
House
  • Remove shingles.
  • Remove sheathing, insulation, and poly.
  • Insulators come in.
  • Re-sheet deck (we are supplying material).
  • Install EPDM system.
  • New skylights installed.
  • Edge flashing to be white.
  • Gutters and downs replaced to be white.
Garage
  • Remove shingles.
  • Reapply new green shingles.
4. We have spoken to three insulators that we normally use and will be deciding this weekend on whom we will be using; also have to speak to the fourth insulator that [the client] provided the contact information for (before making a decision). Inspection, May 11 2011: After selecting and contacting/contracting an insulator, we sent them on location to take measurements of the work area to understand how much material will need to be ordered. They were curious about the existing insulation, and whether they were to remove it or not. We put them in touch with the client to sort out the details on insulation removal. With respect to the spray foam insulation, however, the contractor advised us that they can only do the rooftop insulation in the event that weather permits and is not too windy. Roof Report, May 16 2011: Our crew loaded the metal and trim for two jobs, and drove into town to make the delivery. From 1:00-2:00pm they dropped the supplies for the first job, then made their way over to this job's site for 2:00pm and unloaded the tools and metal for the job. Roof Report, May 17 2011: The team, being yet unable to work on the roof, delivered the Ice & Water shield in addition to the tools required to work with the barrier. They left the site shortly after arrival to continue deliveries of materials to other job sites in the city. After picking up the necessary wood for this roof, they returned around 8:30pm and dropped it off; departing the site at 9:00pm. Roof Report, May 23 2011: One of the project leads met with the client to answer some questions about the job's progress. They discussed how the ridge vent is venting, and some of the desired changes to existing roof features. The client wants a guard installed on the gutter behind the house, and the eavestrough on the right side of the house raised to meet the new downpipe. The EPDM system was also discussed, and how the skylight installation would be performed. This meeting took just over an hour, and the project lead departed around 9:30 Roof Report, June 23 2011: We installed one of the two skylights, but the second was incorrectly sized and the order needs to be placed again. The client was very understanding, and we will get back to them as soon as the replacement comes in. Roof Report, July 12 2011: We received the replacement skylight last Thursday [July 7] but were unable to install it with inclement weather over the weekend. The plan is to install it the next nice day that comes about; we need at least one hour of dry weather to perform the installation. Roof Report, October 26 2011: The client notified us that there was some moisture coming in from the roof in an area where renovations were still in progress. Give that there was no rain this day, we were confused about where the moisture could be coming in. We sent over one of our crew members to attend to the concern and evaluate what repair options are necessary. Roof Report, October 27 2011: The client notified us again about a problem with the roof, this time the concern lay with the recently installed skylight. It would appear that some moisture was dripping down around the lower edge, so they requested that we look into it and make the necessary repairs before winter. Our teams were backed up with work, but we promised to send out a repair crew as soon as possible. Roof Report, November 10 2011: We arrived on-site for 1:30pm, and spoke briefly with the client before they had to leave for another meeting. The crew assessed the skylight and determined the materials needed for a proper repair. Furthermore, we cut open the bathroom fan flashing and the roof deck to access the connection at the master bedroom. As the flashings were about to be replaced with new ones, it began to rain. Temporary patches were put in place, and the client was advised not to use the fan for the evening and that we would return the following day.
image 4
Exposing the roof deck to gain access to the master bedroom connection.
image 3
We cut open the bathroom fan roof flashing to access the master bedroom. The insulators we were working with needed to know the amount of materials they would have to requisition and whether any or all of it required removal.
image 1
The client had also reported leaks entering the building around the vicinity of this plumbing vent.
image 2
Coupled with a failing sealant system, the base of the unit was also peeling apart.
image 6
We removed the vent and decking to inspect for moist insulation and general water damage at the connections.
 
Roof Report, November 11 2011: Our repair crew spent the day on-site to address the leaking skylight. They began by removing the skylight itself and cleaned off the old membrane. Next, the curb was rebuilt to an 8-inch height, and the bottom was detailed with 2" x 2" for a solid sub-straight for drywalling. The entire skylight had to be dismantled for proper access to the membrane, so it was reassembled, caulked, tooled, and reinstallation. After the skylight was dealt with, we spoke to the client and let them know that we would return the following morning to give the same examinations and repairs to the bathroom fans and the soft spots at the each end of the ridge. Roof Report, November 14 2011: On this day, the GRS crew members arrived for 9am and spoke with the client to let them know of the scope of work for the day. We managed to repair both of the bathroom fan details, and half of the lower skylight (ran out of materials). All that remains (beyond the skylight) is the soft spot on the ridge, which should be repaired tomorrow with proper materials on-hand.
November 15 001
We began the skylight replacement by removing the flashing and exposing the roof around the fixture.
November 15 003
Next, the unit itself was removed.
November 15 004
A new frame was installed. The previous skylight had been installed directly into the roof.
November 15 005
Installing the skylight into place over the new frame,
November 15 008
Next, we sealed the frame into the roof using seam tape. and metal flashing.
November 15 009
Liquid rubber coatings were applied over the corners and the seams.
November 15 011
Our repair of the bathroom fan details entailed installing new vents and replacing the insulation in the master bedroom connection.
November 15 012
After replacing the exposed section with a new board, it was patched over with EPDM.
November 15 014
Finishing up the second vent installation. The seams were made watertight with spud.
< End Report > CODE: 5408 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.