Commercial Roof Recovery for Existing Client in Edmonton AB, April to June 2015

Below you will find a series of quotations for an existing commercial client. We had previously dealt with some leaks for them as outlined here. This time, the client required a roof recovery for a 28 ft. x 44 ft. garage. Client files request, April 20 2015:
I know that you quoted on the small garage, we would like another quote that requires the following: layout, retrofit, TPO roof, no asphalt.
Quotation, April 20 2015:
  • Layover, remove stone.
  • Install new 2 in. polyisocyanurate and 0.45 mm TPO membrane.
  • New flashing is required all around to match the front of the building.
Assessment, June 22 2015: We arrived at 8:00 am and searched for roof leaks around the unit for two hours. With no luck, there was still the remaining task of installing the last drain unit over another one of the units which needed work. The roof on the second building is a 28 ft. x 44 ft. BUR roof on a wood deck that leaks in too many places to fix. One drain on the northwest corner and three other penetrations, as well as two vents and a motor exhaust are going through the roof. There is a 4 in. wood detail around the edge and one scupper. We suggest an EPDM roof recovery. The maintenance manager for the site also gave us a call to tell us that a leak was found on the west wall of the building. The crew found numerous rips in the roof along the membrane; it had been completely separated from the drain.

Materials:

  • 5 ft. of cap
  • 5 ft. of base
  • 1x can of spray primer
  • 1x 3 in. drain
  • 1 can of mastic
  • 1x roll of 6 in. reinforcement mesh
New quotation based on assessment, June 22 2015:
  • Gum patches to three or more areas
  • Replace the drain with a new 3 in. unit
  • Roof replacement using an SBS 2 ply system
  • Estimated time: 20 hours
< End Report > Code: 128 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Residential Flat Roof Repair Edmonton, June 9 2015

Article: Residential Flat Roof Repair Edmonton, Alberta. EPDM Low Slope Roof Membrane.

Repair of an EPDM low slope roof on a residential home in Edmonton, Alberta. The low slope (flat) roof transitions to a pitched shingle roof. Penetrations and challenges include chimney, skylights, vents, drainage, ice damming, and insulating value on low slope. Additionally the transition between the low and steep roof systems posed challenges. Also a section on choosing the correct low slope membrane and roof assembly.
This customer had originally called us when Edmonton had set records for snow-fall in January of 2012. She had significant snow loads on her roof and the concern was that her roof may collapse. So we removed the snow from her roof and discovered significant ice damming challenges on the low slope portion.
We returned in 2013 and 2014 to do regular roof snow removal because every-time the snow built up on the roof the heat from inside her home would get to the underside of the low slope roof sheathing and cause ice damming. The ice dams would then get in between the laps of the existing roof membrane and result in leaks.
Mid 2014 she contacted us to quote on the replacement of the low slope roofing with hopes of solving the problem.
We quoted the various options for low slope roofing membranes, which included; Spray Foam (SPF), Tar and Gravel, SBS Torch-On, EPDM, TPO, PVC and Liquid Rubber.
Our standard quotations include pricing for the different options available for flat roof system membranes, a roof inspection report, a write-up on the pro's and con's of each type of system and our recommendations for your most suitable roof membrane choices.
Below is a sample flat roof quotation. The first link is a PDF download and the second is a Word Doc file download.
Our customer chose to replace her failing tar and gravel built up roof with an EPDM single ply membrane roof recovery (or retro-fit). This means that we removed the gravel and skinned the bitumen membrane off and then mechanically fastened a roof board and then fully adhered the EPDM. We also did some drain work and scupper work. Our customer did not opt for a complete removal, re-sloping with an engineered slope insulation system, or any additional R value added which could also have been done with simple rigid type insulation boards.
In early 2015 our customer had called with leaks to the low slope membrane - the ice dams were back. This is an important lesson in choosing the correct roof membrane, insulation, drainage, re-sloping and more. Had we been able to re-slope the roof and been able to add insulation value, the heat from the inside of the home would not escape and get to the underside of the roof membrane and cause ice damming. But, the customer requested the least expensive options and even though our reports (see link above for sample quotation and inspection report) explain in detail most considerations, this is the way it was requested to be done by the customer.
So this spring we returned to find the same ice damming causing issues with a now new membrane. We also found drainage issues which were expected - the roof was ponding because a re-slope was not in our scope. And there were some technical (debatable) installation tweaks that may or may not have been required. Nonetheless, we now had a new roof leaking the year after it was installed.
So of course we once again suggested the upgrade options to alleviate the issue but the customer would have nothing with that and requested we simply do the repairs and move on.
Below is an account from the crew of the type of repairs they did to try and mitigate any issues in the future (full well knowing that the prime aggravating factors are insulation value and sloping).
May 5, 2015: Crew Attends to Residential Flat Roof Repair.  We arrived on site at 9:58. We started the day with the toolbox meeting and safety documents. We then went up on roof to determine an installation plan. The scope of work we decided on and did is as follows.
Scope of Work # 1 The first step was to pull all EPDM down to flat roof from under the shingles at the bottom of the sloped roof. This reinstall was to ensure no water could be coming from the flat roof to steep pitch roof transition. We then had to remove all metal flashing from around the two skylights and chimney on the roof. Once we had all the EPDM pulled we started lifting shingles along the first few rows of the sloped roof and applied the EPDM bonding adhesive. This was done under the first couple layers of shingles and to the underside of the EPDM. We then installed the EPDM back under the shingles. Then next step was to apply a bead of water block on the edge of the EPDM under the shingles. Once that was complete we secured EPDM by screwing a piece of turn-bar down on the edge of the EPDM where the water block bead was applied.
Scope of Work # 2 The crew arrived on site at 1 pm and started working on the cricket behind the chimney.  He started by cutting a piece of EPDM 7'x3'. He then had to take the Epdm bonding adhesive and apply in the same manner as the work in scope # 1 by applying the adhesive under the shingles as well as the under side of the Epdm. Once the 7'x3' piece was installed he started working on the corners. Using quick prime and seam tape he seamed in the corners of the Epdm around the chimney.
 
WORK LEFT TO DO: -patch corners -more turn bar and water block -install and or replace shingles Roughly 6 hours of work left to complete.
MATERIALS USED: -7'x3' piece of EPDM -EPDM bonding adhesive 1/3 of a pail -screws -30 ' of termination bar - 2 tubes of water block -tube of caulking for skylights -half a tube of lap sealer for temporary seals -6 feet of seam tape - quick prime 1/8th of a pail.
Residential Flat Roof Repair Edmonton. Pulling EPDM out from under shingles.
Residential Flat Roof Repair Edmonton. Pulling EPDM out from under shingles.
Peeling back Epdm membrane from skylight curbs.
Peeling back Epdm membrane from skylight curbs.
Taking flashing off chimney
Taking flashing off chimney.
Applied EPDM Adhesive
Applied EPDM Adhesive.
Rolling EPDM back under shingles after adhesive was applied.
Rolling EPDM back under shingles after adhesive was applied.
Installed Piece of Termination bar on tup edge of EPDM (under shingles)
Installed Piece of Termination bar on top edge of EPDM (under shingles).
joining two seams of EPDM, with quick prime and seam tape
Joining two seams of EPDM, with quick prime and seam tape.
May 8, 2015: Residential Flat Roof Repair Crew Attends.
We started at 7:30 AM with a daily tool box meeting. We then got up on the roof and started shoveling snow away from work area so we could complete today's scope of work.
Scope #1. Scope one consisted of applying corner patches to the rear corners of the chimney. The next step was to apply tape primer to the EPDM surface on the corner of the chimney. We then cut 6"×6" squares of 6" covers strip  to use at the corner patch.  We applied  this piece on top of the tape primer and let it sit to cure.
Scope #2. Install termination bar for the EPDM on the front of the skylights. For this we measured and cut a piece of turn bar to fit the front side of the sky light. We then screwed (mechanically fastened) the termination bar.
Scope #3. We had to take the bottom two layers of shingles off and replace with new ones. For this we had to carefully lift the bottom rows of shingles and pry out the nails so the shingles would slide out. We then took the new shingles and installed them. This consisted of laying down the first layer and nailing in place. The next step was to put on the second row of shingles which slid under the old existing one and nailed in place half way down the first shingle we layer down. Job is complete.
Completion photo #1 of where shingles at steep pitch meet low slope EPDM membrane.
Completion photo #1 of where shingles at steep pitch meet low slope EPDM membrane.
completion photo #2
Completion photo #2.
Materials Used:
-2 bundles of shingles
-roofing nails
-8'of turn bar
-2' of cover strip
-rags
- tape primer
-screws

< End of report >

Click here to visit our local roof repair website and order a quotation for flat roof repair in Edmonton or area or contact us per below.

CONTACT US
Call our 24 Hour Emergency Roof Repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5.
For all other areas of Canada call 1.877.497.3528 Toll Free.
We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.
  Code: 10007

EPDM Roof Replacement Edmonton, June 8 2015

ARTICLE: EPDM Roof Replacement Edmonton, Alberta. Flat Roof, Residential, Single-Ply Membrane. Firestone.

A roof site report documenting the installation of a small flat roof on a residential property. We replaced the roof with EPDM membrane in Edmonton, Alberta. The old roof was a roll on built up roof. About EPDM Roofing. Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer (EPDM) roofing is now one of the more used roof systems in North America. EPDM roofing is a single-ply roof membrane like TPO and PVC. The single-ply membranes came along more than forty years ago after tar and gravel and SBS modified torch-on. The most popular single-ply roof membrane systems in Canada are EPDM (rubber roofing), TPO (thermal plastic) and PVC (poly-vinyl). Single-ply membranes are more affordable than tradition BUR and torch on roofing systems due primarily to labor savings. Single ply roof material is also less costly, but the main savings comes as a result of installation time being less. In warmer climates, white or reflective roofs produce a net benefit for building efficiency. In colder climates (like Alberta), a black membrane such as EPDM produces a net benefit because we have more cold days than warm days. EPDM can assist with snow melt being faster and this improves overall building performance and efficiency by lessening the roof dead weight load. A dark roof will also melt ice dams quicker resulting in less maintenance due to membrane damage caused by ice and snow. EPDM also has the benefit of thermal shock durability. The EPDM roofing association states that EPDM has expansion of 300 percent. When you add the UV stability EPDM possesses to its expansion qualities it makes sense to use it in any environment. Traditional BUR and torch on SBS do not have the same expansion quality or UV stability. Tar and gravel requires pea gravel and SBS requires granules to protect it from the sun’s rays. Even TPO and PVC do not have the expansion qualities of EPDM. A significant benefit of using EPDM is that science tells us in many recent studies that in a cold climate single ply reflective roofs are prone to condensation issues – EPDM is black and doesn’t pose that issue. EPDM can last more than 40 years because of its high resistance to ultraviolet (UV) radiation according to the EPDM Roofing Association (ERA). EPDM’s resistance to moisture absorption allows it to be installed on roof systems with less of a slope than other single-plies. EPDM is also used for waterproofing reservoirs, geo-membranes, ponds and has many other uses. Choosing the Right Membrane for You. When choosing a low slope roof membrane we suggest examining the various options available on the market. Many contractors only install one or two options and are therefore not your unbiased source. Obtaining quotes from contractors that represent all system choices will help you determine which system is right for your building considering budget, performance, warranty, climate, efficiency and many more considerations. We see it all the time (the wrong choice) because we are roof repair experts - we process thousands of incoming inquiries every  year. We have seen people purchase EPDM when their roof was a high traffic area, which is not the correct membrane. We have seen large sophisticated operations in northern or central Alberta and Saskatchewan opt for a reflective membrane citing their green initiatives, which is not usually going to produce a net benefit and if you study it out will likely not hit the end goal target relating to green objectives. We have even had building operators in areas as far north as Dawson Creek or Rainbow Lake ask for a spray foam (spf) roof with a reflective covering such as polyurea on a metal roof system because their goal was to achieve waterproofing. Spray foam (spf) roofing of course will insulate but it doesn't assist in waterproofing and a reflective roof in a cold climate works against building efficiency. If you want waterproofing on a metal roof use liquid rubber in a cold climate. If you want R value then spray foam is a great option. But why pay for the insulation if you don't need it? There are many more examples. It is very important when choosing a low slope roof membrane to consult the sources and be sure it is the right system for your location and goals. Below is a report from Edmonton, Alberta that has a homeowner choosing EPDM because they wanted a better net benefit than white or cool roofing could offer. They chose a complete replacement vs. a roof recovery (retro-fit) because the existing roof assembly was not sound and there was existing moisture in the old built up roof. They did not require more R value so there was no added spray foam (SPF) or roof insulation boards to the roof. For more information on EPDM roofing visit this article from Construction Canada. http://www.constructioncanada.net/the-single-ply-skinny-on-epdm/ May 23, 2015 - Day one. Crew attends for EPDM roof replacement. 
7:30 am we started our day by going to pick up all materials needed to complete this roof . 9:30 am arrive on site . We did our daily tool box meeting for safety and then went up on the roof and started to tear up the old roof. This was not easy as there were three different roof systems on top of each other. This took 4 hours to do. Once it was fully tore up I started to replace the rotten areas with new sheathing, which wasn't much. We also had to install sheathing on the back portion of the roof.  To install the sheathing we used nails and nailed down the sheathing to the roof framing where it needed to be changed out.
Condition of the substrate on the old roof.
Condition of the substrate on the old roof.
EPDM Roof Replacement Edmonton. Old Built Up Roof before replacement.
EPDM Roof Replacement Edmonton. Old Built Up Roof before replacement.
Ripping up old roof
Ripping up old built up flat roof.
 cleaning up debris after ripping up roof
Cleaning up debris after ripping up roof.
 

May 24, 2015 - Day two on site.

8 am we arrived on site and had our daily tool box meeting. We then went on the roof and started sheathing in the entire roof. Once I got the guys installing plywood on other side of roof we went to install the EPDM on the back portion of the roof. Once that was complete we helped finish the sheathing along the parapet walls.

Once the roof was fully sheathed we then started to lay rubber on our open field. We managed to get most of it done, but we will have to return for 5 hours tomorrow to finish the roof.

Installing Sheathing on roof
Installing sheathing on roof.
Parapet wall construction for EPDM roof.
Parapet wall construction for EPDM roof.

May 25, 2015: DAY 3 completion.

We started the day with our daily tool box meeting. We went up on the roof and we started finishing the EPDM on field of the roof. We then started on the parapet walls.

When one side of the parapet wall was complete we then started on the other side of the parapet walls. When the parapet walls were done we then started to seal in the drain with form flash and install all the seam patches and corner patches also with form flash.

Once that was finished I helped the guys finish the other parapet wall. The crew then cleaned up the roof and the ground while I sealed in the other drain and corners with form flash. When the roof was complete I then put lap seal in the corners with patches and all three laps. The home owner did a quick inspection when we where finished and was extremely happy with the work.

Finished EPDM ROOF
Finished EPDM Roof.
EPDM roof installation Edmonton, Alberta.
EPDM roof installation Edmonton, Alberta.
EPDM roof membrane installed.
EPDM roof membrane installed.

The rest of the following photos are all finish product photos of the new EPDM Flat Roof.

Materials Used: EPDM. 3 cans of bonding adhesive. 1 can of quick prime. 1 can of lap adhesive. 2 rolls of 3 inch seam tape. 1 roll of form flash. 30 sheets of plywood. 1 box of nails 100. 1 box of 2 inch wood screws 500. 2 tubes of lap sealant. 10 pieces of drip edge.

CONTACT US
Call our 24 Hour Emergency Roof Repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5.
For all other areas of Canada call 1.877.497.3528 Toll Free.
We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.
    Code: 9311

Athabasca DecTec Balcony Assessment, February 2015

Our client, located north of Edmonton, reached out to GRS to explore the option of installing DecTec Membrane on a balcony off the second floor of their building. Scope of Work: 1) Removal and disposal of existing roof assembly under the existing membrane that would interfere with new surface installation. 2) Removal/replace rotten sheathing (if any). 3) Mild increase to slope to encourage drainage. 4) Door openings may have to be customized to account for new slope. 5) Flashing may have to be re-done to accommodate new slope as well. 6) Deck railing removed and replaced to ensure safety. 7) Waterproofing of walls to allow for vertical installations. Ensures watertight fit. 8) Upon completion of 1-7 (as necessary), floating deck can then be installed to support viable systems (SBS Modified Torch, EPDM, TPO, or PVC), though DecTec does not require a floating deck to sit atop the membrane.   Proposed Solution DecTec bore GRS's recommendation for this project, as we employ all of the technicians typically required to see a successful installation. The client was simply looking for a quote for this type of project, which we were happy to provide.   Existing Decking: Pre-DecTec Installation 1 Pre-DecTec Installation 2 Pre-DecTec Installation 3 Pre-DecTec Installation 4 Pre-DecTec Installation 5 Pre-DecTec Installation 6     Until next time,         The Roofers at GRS CODE: 4510 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.  

Edmonton Roof Repair and Maintenance Service, April 2012

This report summarizes an annual maintenance and repair service done to ensure a water-tight state on a complete roof system. A subsequent return was required in order to touch-up potential problem areas. The crew arrived on site and began prepping the standing water areas. Next they rolled on high build 200 (14' x 26' 364 square ft.). A crew member called the project manager to begin fire watch as a propane torch was required to make repairs. Rubberized membrane was rolled onto the affected areas which were causing water leaks. 20150908_16521520150908_165219 20150908_165224 20150908_165232 20150908_165249repairs and rubberized membraine 030repairs and rubberized membraine 039 repairs and rubberized membraine 040 repairs and rubberized membraine 041repairs and rubberized membraine 027 repairs and rubberized membraine 016 repairs and rubberized membraine 034 The initial repairs had been done but there was still some leaking occurring. The crew returned to the site, located a couple of areas that could be potential problems and did some touch up work. The return visit only took one hour. 20140616_152333_resized 20140616_152326_resized 20140616_152316_resized20140616_150424_resized 20140616_150500_resized 20140616_152312_resized < End Report > CODE: 13131 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.