Photo Journal: TPO Flat Roof Recovery and Sloped Insulation in High Level, AB

Below you will find a photo journal from a commercial contract in High Level, Alberta. The work entailed a TPO flat roof recovery and sloped insulation. Background When a roof reaches the end of its life, our clients are faced with the choice of either a full replacement or a recovery. Roof recovery refers to applying a new system over an existing one when the roof is reaching its end-of-life (1). Depending on climate conditions, preference, or preexisting solutions, a roof recovery may be performed using TPO, EPDM, bitumen, cap-sheets and/or asphalt. Sloped insulation refers to the tapering that exists on an insulation system. As a weatherproofing measure, when precipitation reaches your roof, it will run off into the drain system down the slope. Call us today for a consult on which roof recovery system is right for your commercial, industrial, or residential environment. < End Journal > Code: HIGH Article Topics: TPO Flat Roof High Level Alberta. Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Roof Leak Repair in Edmonton AB, December 2014 and July 2015

Below you will find an assessment and field report from the Edmonton roof leak repair crew for a residential client. The roof had been experiencing leaks on two occasions due to a lack of proper ventilation and insulation. Assessment, December 12 2014: By the time we had arrived, the leaking had stopped. However, our client still had buckets out in her kitchen for water collection. The client also showed me the garage, where there appeared to be water damaged on the ceiling. Again, no evident leaking at the time of assessment. A roof inspection was also completed, and we found 4 in. of ice damming.
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Water collection in kitchen
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Interior assessment
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Garage assessment
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Ice damming
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First leak site
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Second leak site
  Installation, July 20 2015: When I arrived on-site, the client showed me two leaks. One was in the living room and another in a bedroom. Both leaks were in line with each other. On the roof, a crack running half the length of the roof was found - the same cracked that was fixed the year before. The crack had probably reoccurred due to a lack of insulation and venting. We fixed the crack again with LR and the client was notified about the insulation and ventilation.
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Crack running the roof length
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Reoccurring crack
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Flooding the area
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LR repair
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LR, post-application
  < End Report > Code: 6407 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Residential Flat Roof Repair Edmonton, June 9 2015

Article: Residential Flat Roof Repair Edmonton, Alberta. EPDM Low Slope Roof Membrane.

Repair of an EPDM low slope roof on a residential home in Edmonton, Alberta. The low slope (flat) roof transitions to a pitched shingle roof. Penetrations and challenges include chimney, skylights, vents, drainage, ice damming, and insulating value on low slope. Additionally the transition between the low and steep roof systems posed challenges. Also a section on choosing the correct low slope membrane and roof assembly.
This customer had originally called us when Edmonton had set records for snow-fall in January of 2012. She had significant snow loads on her roof and the concern was that her roof may collapse. So we removed the snow from her roof and discovered significant ice damming challenges on the low slope portion.
We returned in 2013 and 2014 to do regular roof snow removal because every-time the snow built up on the roof the heat from inside her home would get to the underside of the low slope roof sheathing and cause ice damming. The ice dams would then get in between the laps of the existing roof membrane and result in leaks.
Mid 2014 she contacted us to quote on the replacement of the low slope roofing with hopes of solving the problem.
We quoted the various options for low slope roofing membranes, which included; Spray Foam (SPF), Tar and Gravel, SBS Torch-On, EPDM, TPO, PVC and Liquid Rubber.
Our standard quotations include pricing for the different options available for flat roof system membranes, a roof inspection report, a write-up on the pro's and con's of each type of system and our recommendations for your most suitable roof membrane choices.
Below is a sample flat roof quotation. The first link is a PDF download and the second is a Word Doc file download.
Our customer chose to replace her failing tar and gravel built up roof with an EPDM single ply membrane roof recovery (or retro-fit). This means that we removed the gravel and skinned the bitumen membrane off and then mechanically fastened a roof board and then fully adhered the EPDM. We also did some drain work and scupper work. Our customer did not opt for a complete removal, re-sloping with an engineered slope insulation system, or any additional R value added which could also have been done with simple rigid type insulation boards.
In early 2015 our customer had called with leaks to the low slope membrane - the ice dams were back. This is an important lesson in choosing the correct roof membrane, insulation, drainage, re-sloping and more. Had we been able to re-slope the roof and been able to add insulation value, the heat from the inside of the home would not escape and get to the underside of the roof membrane and cause ice damming. But, the customer requested the least expensive options and even though our reports (see link above for sample quotation and inspection report) explain in detail most considerations, this is the way it was requested to be done by the customer.
So this spring we returned to find the same ice damming causing issues with a now new membrane. We also found drainage issues which were expected - the roof was ponding because a re-slope was not in our scope. And there were some technical (debatable) installation tweaks that may or may not have been required. Nonetheless, we now had a new roof leaking the year after it was installed.
So of course we once again suggested the upgrade options to alleviate the issue but the customer would have nothing with that and requested we simply do the repairs and move on.
Below is an account from the crew of the type of repairs they did to try and mitigate any issues in the future (full well knowing that the prime aggravating factors are insulation value and sloping).
May 5, 2015: Crew Attends to Residential Flat Roof Repair.  We arrived on site at 9:58. We started the day with the toolbox meeting and safety documents. We then went up on roof to determine an installation plan. The scope of work we decided on and did is as follows.
Scope of Work # 1 The first step was to pull all EPDM down to flat roof from under the shingles at the bottom of the sloped roof. This reinstall was to ensure no water could be coming from the flat roof to steep pitch roof transition. We then had to remove all metal flashing from around the two skylights and chimney on the roof. Once we had all the EPDM pulled we started lifting shingles along the first few rows of the sloped roof and applied the EPDM bonding adhesive. This was done under the first couple layers of shingles and to the underside of the EPDM. We then installed the EPDM back under the shingles. Then next step was to apply a bead of water block on the edge of the EPDM under the shingles. Once that was complete we secured EPDM by screwing a piece of turn-bar down on the edge of the EPDM where the water block bead was applied.
Scope of Work # 2 The crew arrived on site at 1 pm and started working on the cricket behind the chimney.  He started by cutting a piece of EPDM 7'x3'. He then had to take the Epdm bonding adhesive and apply in the same manner as the work in scope # 1 by applying the adhesive under the shingles as well as the under side of the Epdm. Once the 7'x3' piece was installed he started working on the corners. Using quick prime and seam tape he seamed in the corners of the Epdm around the chimney.
 
WORK LEFT TO DO: -patch corners -more turn bar and water block -install and or replace shingles Roughly 6 hours of work left to complete.
MATERIALS USED: -7'x3' piece of EPDM -EPDM bonding adhesive 1/3 of a pail -screws -30 ' of termination bar - 2 tubes of water block -tube of caulking for skylights -half a tube of lap sealer for temporary seals -6 feet of seam tape - quick prime 1/8th of a pail.
Residential Flat Roof Repair Edmonton. Pulling EPDM out from under shingles.
Residential Flat Roof Repair Edmonton. Pulling EPDM out from under shingles.
Peeling back Epdm membrane from skylight curbs.
Peeling back Epdm membrane from skylight curbs.
Taking flashing off chimney
Taking flashing off chimney.
Applied EPDM Adhesive
Applied EPDM Adhesive.
Rolling EPDM back under shingles after adhesive was applied.
Rolling EPDM back under shingles after adhesive was applied.
Installed Piece of Termination bar on tup edge of EPDM (under shingles)
Installed Piece of Termination bar on top edge of EPDM (under shingles).
joining two seams of EPDM, with quick prime and seam tape
Joining two seams of EPDM, with quick prime and seam tape.
May 8, 2015: Residential Flat Roof Repair Crew Attends.
We started at 7:30 AM with a daily tool box meeting. We then got up on the roof and started shoveling snow away from work area so we could complete today's scope of work.
Scope #1. Scope one consisted of applying corner patches to the rear corners of the chimney. The next step was to apply tape primer to the EPDM surface on the corner of the chimney. We then cut 6"×6" squares of 6" covers strip  to use at the corner patch.  We applied  this piece on top of the tape primer and let it sit to cure.
Scope #2. Install termination bar for the EPDM on the front of the skylights. For this we measured and cut a piece of turn bar to fit the front side of the sky light. We then screwed (mechanically fastened) the termination bar.
Scope #3. We had to take the bottom two layers of shingles off and replace with new ones. For this we had to carefully lift the bottom rows of shingles and pry out the nails so the shingles would slide out. We then took the new shingles and installed them. This consisted of laying down the first layer and nailing in place. The next step was to put on the second row of shingles which slid under the old existing one and nailed in place half way down the first shingle we layer down. Job is complete.
Completion photo #1 of where shingles at steep pitch meet low slope EPDM membrane.
Completion photo #1 of where shingles at steep pitch meet low slope EPDM membrane.
completion photo #2
Completion photo #2.
Materials Used:
-2 bundles of shingles
-roofing nails
-8'of turn bar
-2' of cover strip
-rags
- tape primer
-screws

< End of report >

Click here to visit our local roof repair website and order a quotation for flat roof repair in Edmonton or area or contact us per below.

CONTACT US
Call our 24 Hour Emergency Roof Repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5.
For all other areas of Canada call 1.877.497.3528 Toll Free.
We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.
  Code: 10007

Edmonton Commercial Flat Roof Replacement, January 2015

This commercial client in Edmonton was presented with a quotation for a flat roof replacement. The report follows the crew as they performed the replacement over the course of several months. Scope of Work:
  • Scrape gravel down to existing 4 ply membrane and take down to dispose.
  • Supply and glue down a FR board (1/2 inch fiberboard adhered to a 95 gram sanded poly sheet) and seal all laps.
  • Supply and back torch a 180 gram armour bound peal and stick up walls and all penetrations.
  • Remove and replace any wet insulation.
  • Owners to move and re-position satellite and communication systems.
  • Clean all debris and haul away.
Roof Report, January 21, 2015:
We arrived on site at 2:10 pm and I got set up to continue with the cap stripping. At the same time we were waiting to see what was going to happen with the weather since it was still drizzling. I went through the safety paperwork and then we helped with removing the garbage from the roof and brought it to the bin. 20141212_14051920141212_195820 20141212_195807 20141212_140503 Roof Report, January 23, 2015: After our toolbox meeting we proceeded to install FR board on the upper mechanical roof and did so until the point of satellites in all directions. We then installed peel and stick stripping wherever possible and sopramastic waterproofing in all other protrusions.
Cleaned up and left site at 4:30pm.
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Roof Report, February 12, 2015:
This morning after we were done with the safety reports, we went to the upper roof and continued with the base seal tie in. I had two other crew members remove snow from the entire upper roof while I started to install peel and stick on the curbs. After I was done with the curbs on the north side of the roof, I installed patches over the plates and installed gussets were there were none. I also found several spots that needed patches in the field and repaired as required.
Roof Report, February 14, 2015:
Started to lay in FR board where they moved the satellite towers. Once we got the base done on one I had a crew member start capping it in while myself and another crew member started to base in the next section. Both sections were capped by the end of the day which made the client happy. Then I stayed on site to complete fire watch.
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Roof Report, February 18, 2015:
This morning we started on completing the NE corner of the roof by installing the last of the FR board. We also started sealing around the curbs and perimeter.
We then moved to the SW corner and completed the base tie in around the satellite and patched plate holes in the area. Fire watch from 3:30pm to 5:30pm.
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Roof Report, February 19, 2013: Once we got to the site we continued with the base tie in around the large curb and the parapet on the SW corner of the upper roof.
Roof Report, March 7, 2015: Today we completed the field cap and most of the DE granulating around the details. Roof Report, March 9, 2015:
Bill and me completed the cap stripping on the upper roof today and need to touch up the gum boxes and granules to finish the SBS on the upper roof. We then completed the curbs on the main roof and started to install the plumbing vents when it started to rain at 3 pm. I am not happy with the large ponding area on the east side of the main roof and would like permission to extend the sump on the east side with a trough through the high spot so that more water drains.  I would have to cut out the FR board from the sump about 1 ft. wide west about 10 ft. to where the water ponds 3 inches at the deepest point. Then tie in the old roof to new torch on roof through the trough. This would require 10 man hours and another roll of cap which would add another 2 years to the life of the cap in that area. Roof Report, March 10, 2015:
Today we installed 8 plumbing vents and touched up the existing plumbing vents with smag and granules. We completed the west drop drain install and reset the air units on the SW corner of the main roof. We then cleaned the entire main roof and downloaded all the garbage. Roof Report, March 11, 2015:
This morning we completed the touch ups on the gum boxes of the upper roof and then started installing the metal around the perimeter of the upper roof and found that we were short one length. On the far east side of the roof there looks to be another piece missing that would cover the electrical lines and 2-18 inch storm collars are gone as well. We installed all the metal that was there and added extra screws and smack pins to make them very solid.
Roof Report, March 12, 2015: After the weekly meeting in the morning we met up at Home Depot for caulking and then went to the site. We spent extra time on resetting all the wire tracks on the upper roof and finished off the storm collars with caulking as well. 2 of the 18 inch stacks still have no storm collars but we filled them with caulking anyway. With no metal flashing on the wall detail on the upper roof, we made sure that water would not pond there by completely filling the riglet with caulking. We downloaded the rest of the tools, rolls of base, and propane into the small trailer and parked it in the very NE corner of the parking lot.  The bin is still on site and will need to be removed.
Follow-up Inspection, August 19, 2015: Upon visual inspection of the roof. I noticed 6 different blisters had developed. Attached is a copy of a roof map that shows the approximate locations of the blisters. Continuing on we walked the entire roof, testing the membrane to make sure the insulation was properly adhered to the roof underneath. I would say that there is no issues with the adhesion. The following is a list of the repairs that should be made to said deficiencies:
  • A lack of chipping away at the existing roof that was re-roofed led to a ridge. We can either build it up around it, leveling it off, or cut it and patch it.
  • Run a patch to meet lapping requirements.
  • Pipes need to be patched.
  • Anchor fasten the flashing correctly to the wall. Ms detail to seal the flashing.
  • Replace with concrete paving stones and roof mate underneath, and have a drainage mat under the roof mate.
  • Run a drainage mat or roof mate.
  • Install storm collars and caulk them.
  • Have a flashing made up and installed.
  • Have a sheet metal cap fabricated and installed.
  • Install cap sheet, roof mate, drainage mat and paving stones.
  • Box it in with cap and quick prime.
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< End Report > CODE: 11834 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Edmonton Commercial Metal Roof Leak Repair, August 2011

This report begins with a quotation outlining various options for a metal roof repair. There is moisture entering the building and leaking which is occurring after rain and snow falls. There also appears to be a number of maintenance issues with the existing sheet metal. Roof Observation Report: Very difficult to pinpoint where the moisture is entering, however it appears to be coming in at a number of areas. The metal roofing has a number of maintenance/sheet metal issues but the inherent expansion and contraction also likely causes issue. This roof leaks after the snow melts and heavy rainfalls. The roof is approximately 25 years old and could use a metal roof replacement but the Engineered Liquid Rubber coating will stop the roof from leaking for many years. Project Manager Recommendations (emailed to client):
This roof structure is a candidate for either a repair-maintenance program or an engineered coating and does not have to be replaced. I would not recommend an elastomeric coating or the SPF Spray Foam as the acrylic and EPDM covering options do not last well in Edmonton climate, but liquid rubber performs well in our climate. Generally speaking, metal roof systems are constant aggravating roof structures. Industrial metal roof systems have a deficient design - they are water-shedding and not water-proofing coverings. Metal expands and contracts more than any other roofing material. Metal roofs tend to leak from expansion and contraction and ice / snow loads. Leaks are intermittent at seams, penetrations (stacks, etc.), fasteners (fastener holes get larger with expansion and contraction), around the perimeter as ice back-ups at gutters and then under eave, and at joints between roof and wall connections. Metal rust / corrosion may start at places, the seams and fasteners are vulnerable from expansion / contraction and snow loads, and any traditional caulking or coating won’t last more than a few seasons at best. Remedies are either spot repairs-maintenance with caulking or more extensive maintenance which involves engineered coatings. Our recommendation is a high end engineered liquid rubber polymer coating that carries a 10 Year Manufacturer Warranty and has option for maintenance contracts for extended warranty. General Roofing is considered a pioneer and leader in engineered roof coatings; (www.liquidrubber.ca, https://www.grscanadainc.com/Roof_Coatings.html, https://www.grscanadainc.com/Liquid_Rubber.html). We have significant liquid rubber operations specifically serving industrial facilities with low slope metal roofs. Our clients include companies such as Imperial Oil, Shell Oil, Telus, Fortis, Toran Power, National Oil Well Varco (NOV), Teck Resources, and many more.(https://www.grscanadainc.com/Project_Portfolio.html). In this instance, we recommend a 2 Ply System engineered liquid rubber coat to complete metal roofing, fastener replacement as required, sheet metal repair as required to-achieve a water-tight state. Typically this is even more successful than a full metal roof replacement. A recent project with photos can be found at; http://generalroofingsystemscanadainc.blogspot.ca/2012/05/roof-repair-liquid-rubber-metal-roof.html Thank you.
August 16th, 2011: The crew arrived on site and found two pipe boots and two patches that were leaking. Also discovered were two large holes in the membrane of the north corner (also causing leaking). It appears that something heavy had dropped on the roof at some point causing the holes. The insulation around the two holes was totally saturated and this was clearly allowing quite a bit of water into the system. The insulation is acting like a sponge and is releasing water into the Q deck and lunch room of the building. The crew performed a drip count within the three areas where dripping was occurring. The first drip count was done before the flood test and the results are as follows: Area 1:  every 10 seconds. Area 2:  every 6 seconds. Area 3:  every 19 seconds. After the repair and during the flood test the results were as follows: Area 1:  every 16 seconds. Area 2:  every 20 seconds. Area 3:  none.
The test indicates that the repairs were successful and that there is a slow drip only because of the still saturated insulation. The crew also searched the rooftop for any other possible leak spots. One area was found and patched. It was further reported to the client that the A/C unit in front of the roof hatch was dripping water from inside the unit.
The client was highly satisfied with the execution of the repairs.
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Two large holes in the membrane were found, and the insulation was completely saturated with water. Water had been entering the building through these holes and leaking into the lunch room.
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We moved the ballast rocks around the piping systems and other roof appliances, checking for deficiencies. The coatings around the base of this drain were past their life cycle.
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Second tear location. Although this section of the roof had previously been patched over, some heavy object had fallen and caused the hole.
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The torn off EPDM was tucked back into place, with new liquid rubber coatings applied over top.
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Coatings completed on both tears.
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After the coatings had cured, they were patched over with new EPDM.
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Finally, caulking was applied over the seams to make the new patches watertight.
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We found some other old patchwork that had been provided in past spot repairs. Some of them had been coming apart, although no water had been entering the building through these sections.
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There were a few other patches along the perimeter of the roof that we also identified as requiring touch-ups.
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Liquid rubber coatings and spud at the seams were applied over these patches to mitigate leaking in the future.
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Water had been dripping from inside of the A/C unit into the roof structure.
< End Report >
CODE: 12250
Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.