Roof Repair 101 – Steps to Contract an Edmonton Roofer

Roof Repair Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Edson, Drayton Valley, Camrose, Wetaskiwin and many more rural areas and towns in Central and Northern Alberta. [Note to reader: This article is a local Edmonton, Alberta adaptation of an article I originally wrote and published to our national roof repair blog. I have adapted the article specific to roof repairs in Edmonton considering the local weather and climate and how our local climate affects roofing material, install, and venting decisions.]

How to Contract a Roofer for Roofing Repair in Edmonton, Alberta.

A little about my roofing background first. I began my roofing career in Alberta about ten years ago. Over the last ten years I have managed crews on commercial and residential for flat roofing, steep pitch and industrial metal roofing from Vancouver to Edmonton, Calgary, Saskatoon, Regina to Toronto. After managing roofers on thousands of roof repairs and various types of work sites all over Canada I can confidently provide you with the key steps of preparation you should engage before hiring your roofing contractor of choice. Hiring an Edmonton roofer for roof repair requires the following steps: Is Your Leaky Edmonton Roofing Repair a Real Emergency or Can it Wait Until the Next Day? The only reason you want to call a roof repair contractor in the evening or on weekends is if it is a real serious emergency. Emergency evening and weekend roof repairs can be expensive and in many instances the leak can't be stopped anyway in the dark or when the roof is too wet. Most roof leaks can wait to be assessed until the next day. But of course, some cannot. We respond to emergency roof repairs for public buildings like commercial businesses (such as restaurants and retail stores), for industrial and manufacturing facilities, for buildings that have lots of computer servers and equipment and that sort of thing. Specific to the Edmonton area we attend to many emergency roofing calls for ice damming, snow loads, and flash rain storms. Roof ice dams can cause a risk to the public if the ice dams are causing ice to fall to the sidewalk for example. Also ice dams can destroy roof systems and cause significant leaks. Snow loads, if excessive, can cause flat roofs and low slope metal roofing to collapse. And flash rain storms can cause flat roofs to collapse (if drains are plugged) and high winds can topple trees on to roofs and lift whole sections of pitched and flat roofing systems. During the roof snow load emergency events in Edmonton the winter of 2011 we responded to many collapsed roofs and buildings that were about to collapse from snow and ice loads.
Emergency, Roof Repair
Edmonton Emergency Roof Service, Metal Roof, Spot Repairs, Industrial
What Type of Building is Your Roof On? Commercial, Residential, Industrial or Institutional? The reason the type of building is important is because not all roofing contractors are experienced with the roof membranes or materials that are commonly used on different types of buildings. Also, and of serious importance, not all roofing contractors and their roofers are familiar with the fine details of working in an industrial environment (for example). Choosing a roofing company that is set up for industrial work (for example) or whatever type of building you have will go a long way to achieving a smooth and successful work completion.
Commercial Roofing
Installing a commercial roof - be sure to hire a roofing company familiar with your type of building.
Is Your Roof Low Slope Metal, a Flat Roof or Steep Pitch Residential? After you have established if the work is an emergency or not, you have identified what type of building they will be working on, then the next step is to determine what category of roof type they will be fixing. The three main types or categories of roof systems are steep slope (such as shingles, cedar, tile, metal etc), low slope membranes or low slope industrial or commercial metal roofs. Identifying which category your system falls in to will really help you with communicating with and identifying contractors that fix roofing with that specific type of work.
EPDM, Roof
Inspecting an EPDM Ballast Roof for pricing preparation.
You Need to Know What Kind of Material is on Your Roof. If there is a place most homeowners or business owners (even professional buyers) make a mistake when choosing and contracting a roofing company is at this step. You want to know specifically what kind of roof material you have because you need to confirm and verify that the company you are hiring is an expert with that specific material. Not all low slope roofing materials are alike. The same applies to steep pitch and standing seam metal roof systems. Flat roof membranes installed in the Edmonton area are typically one of the following: Tar and Gravel (Built up - the one with small pea gravel on top - not river rock size FYI, if larger like river rock that means it is ballasted), SBS Modified (Torch On - many people describe it as rolls with shingle type material on top - granules - it comes in many colors but is most often grey), TPO (Thermal Plastic - it's kind of like a rain coat material and typically white but not always), PVC (Poly Vinyl - it looks like TPO), EPDM (rubber membrane rolls typically black), Liquid Applied Rubberized Asphalt, or a coating such as Liquid Rubber. Steep pitch roofs are typically: shingles, cedar, pine, metal shingles, metal panels (standing seam or not), concrete or clay tile, composite plastic tile, rubber tile or many other. Low slope metal roofs are normally found on commercial and especially industrial buildings. They are typically one of three types or categories... agricultural grade (non locking with exposed fasteners), snap lock type or standing seam of one form or another. The above are simplified lists of available roofing material types but it should give you an idea of how to start the conversation with each company you call if you don't already know specifically what type of material is on your roof.
Roof Hatch, Curb, Roof, Tar
Curb and Hatch Retro-Fit in Edmonton on Tar and Gravel Commercial Roof.
Your Goal Should be to get Pricing for All Options Available for Your Specific Type of Roof Material (be it for temporary fixes, maintenance, replacement or a recover). At this point in your search for the right roofer, you want to task any companies pricing the work to provide you all the possible options for fixing the roof or replacement for your specific material  and building type. Request all options available in writing. Get details. Get pricing for each method and type of material. And most importantly, get the pros and cons of repairing or replacing your system for each method. Even if you are simply getting pricing for renovation work such as drains, curbs, metal parapet flashing, mechanical repairs or a roof hatch it is important to get options for pricing. Here's an example.... EPDM can be installed as fully adhered, mechanically fastened and ballasted. It can be inverted or not. The membrane itself typically comes in 45 mil and 60 mil thickness. The insulation can be sloped or not. The insulation can be different types of insulation and different manufacturers, as with the vapor barrier. Different systems and products have different warranties. And contractors have different workmanship guarantees. So in this example, not all EPDM roofs are equal - it depends on a number of factors. Just like a car is not a car or an SUV is not the same as all SUV's. A flat roof is custom designed and installed for your building, objectives and climate - at least it should be.
Knowing what I know about roofing and assuming I live in Edmonton, here are some of the specific pitfalls I would avoid.
  • Spray Foam (SPF) Roofing Installed Over an Existing Tar and Gravel Roof (or metal or whatever). The reason you need to be cautious about this is that many of the spray foam contractors are not from the roofing industry and many do not understand generally acceptable roofing principles (roofing is a red seal trade). We install spray foam as an option for our customers also, but we know that to do the job right costs real money - there is no shortcut. So the idea that spray foam (SPF) is cheaper than other membrane methods is simply not true (if done in accordance to acceptable standards for our climate). Spray foam can be a fantastic product if done correctly - if the right materials are used and the right thickness of coating over the spray foam is applied.
  • Metal Roofing Will Last Forever. Well, maybe it will last your lifetime. But did you check to see if it may leak? Actually, what it does is condensate (science is on my side there). So if it is a low slope or even moderate slope I would think real hard before installing a metal system. You will want to be sure it is as steep as possible, that the panels are locked properly, and that the installer knows what he or she is doing because there is no fixing a bad metal roof install. Also, don't fall in to the trap of the sales pitch from the manufacturer that says you need to buy their metal panel package and then get an installer - often big mistake. I take calls weekly with people that have bought a standing seam metal panel package and no qualified installer. A qualified standing seam metal crew worth any amount of weight is booked at least many months in advance - which often leaves people stranded if you want your standing seam metal installed this year if you didn't book a crew.
  • Edmonton is Cold - Use Caution. Expansion and contraction with flat roof systems is massive in Edmonton. If you have spray foam installed over a flat roof that has a coating that isn't installed properly (or not thick enough) the coating will crack and peel and water will get in and run between the spray foam and the original roof. You may then have to rip up the old system you covered and the new spray foam system and start all over. Or, if you are coating metal remember that we have more cold days than hot. Do you really think a white or reflective coating in Edmonton can achieve a net efficiency benefit to your building? Highly improbable.
  • Spot Repairs on Low Slope Metal Roofs Should Work? No. Very unlikely. You need to either replace it or do a coating over the whole roof. Why? Because water runs and it will find the path of least resistance. You can try spot repairs but don't be surprised if they don't work is all I'm trying to say.
  • With Shingles Spend the Money on Ice and Water Membrane and Proper Ventilation. Edmonton ice damming on roofs can destroy a home. Why not put a little more money in to your work and do it properly and protect your home? Ice and water should be at least one row but preferably two rows at the eaves. Ice and water shield membrane should also be in the valleys. And ventilation should be calculated and installed properly allowing for proper intake at the soffits and exhaust at the ridge. Ridge vents are the best for this.
  • Flat Roof Deck Membranes. Be cautious to get a good rooftop patio membrane that is suitable for use for foot traffic and as a low slope waterproofing membrane over a heated living space. Dectec is an excellent product for this because you do not need to add a floating deck on top of the roof membrane. Torch on is also good but it has granules so it isn't nice to walk on in bare feet so people end up having to construct a deck on top of the membrane which can cause problems.
  • Should my Low Slope Roof Membrane be White or Black? Unequivocally it should be black in Edmonton. DO NOT buy in to the marketing coming out of the United States - it does not apply to colder climates like Edmonton, Alberta. You do not want to reflect the heat from the building in 99 out of 100 instances. There are more cold days than warm days in Edmonton. Also, white roof membranes are proven to condensate in cold climates (Google search the topic).
  • Know What You Are Buying. We see this all the time. We quote a job and the customer gets two other quotes. The customer comes back to us during the quoting process and says, "but your price is 30% more, boy you guys are expensive". Well, not necessarily - in fact, I know we're not more expensive because the quality contractor that includes a specification for workmanship will last is actually more often than not operating at a lower margin but investing in long term success - in other words, less return trips. So with lower return service trips the quality contractor operating at a lower margin to start with, is actually doing better over the long run. Check the specifications closely - ask us to help and you will find that good value is always found with the quality contractor - always. You just have to discover why.
I will stop there because this article could be a book in length if I continue.
Roof Ponding, Tar and Gravel
Tar and Gravel Roof Ponding.
What are Your Main Objectives With Hiring a Roofing Contractor to do the Work? Your objectives are very important because the solutions for those objectives will determine the direction of discussions and quoting process. The scope of work for your project is directly linked to your objectives (or should be anyway). You need to communicate those objectives to your roofing contractor. It may be that you are keeping the building as a long term investment or not. Or it may be that you are looking for the least costly way just to get you through for the time being. Or, in many instances we are called for mortgage requirements or insurance purposes. Whatever it is, be sure it is clear because that will direct your contractor in the process of designing a specification that is appropriate to your needs.
Roof Deck, Roof Sheathing, Repair
Flat Roof in Edmonton Needing Sheathing Replaced for Rot.
Due Diligence Checking out residential contractors is really important if they haven't been around for a number of years because it is so easy to get a ladder, hammer and call yourself a contractor. The best advice I can give there is that if they have been around five years or more you are likely in good hands. Be cautious of the review sites because they can be "gamed". Just because contractor A has 200 good reviews and contractor B has none doesn't mean a thing. Contractor B may be booked all the time and couldn't be bothered. On the industrial and commercial side of the industry I wouldn't be as concerned. Commercial contractors have to invest significant money and run larger overheads etc. If a commercial contractor has been around for more than five years chances are they will be around for decades and you are in good hands more often than not. It is very unusual for us to run in to a commercial contractor that has been around for years that isn't doing right by their customer.
Rooftop Deck, Patio, Membrane
Low Slope Deck Membrane about to be installed on patio.
Conclusion Hiring the right contractor for your specific goals and needs is paramount to a successful experience. Follow the checklist above and it should provide a decent framework for you to hire properly. We do repairs, maintenance and replacements with every type of residential and commercial or industrial building. We also have expert experience in all methods, specifications and materials in the business. We hire the best roofers in the business (Journeyman Red Seal) and we are dedicated to the best workmanship and back it up with a lifetime workmanship guarantee. If you need any advice or if you have any questions email or call us local in Edmonton at 1.780.424.7663 or complete our online submission form. Call our 24 hour call center anytime to request a quote or roof inspection or visit our local Edmonton Roofing Repair website. I wish you the best with your project! Tyler Sinclair. Below is a video / slide show recapping the important steps to contracting a roofer in Edmonton, Alberta. Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.  

Commercial Tar and Gravel Flat Roof Leak Repair Edmonton, November 2015

Below you will find a routine leak repair service call for a commercial client by our Edmonton roofing repair crew. The following reports underline some of the work we do with other contractors and trades, such as plumbers.  Inspection, November 19 2015: We began to sweep the rock layer on the flat roof to expose the surface so that we could start looking for leaks. After speaking with the building manager, our crew has been asked to wait for a plumber before we inspect the drains. The second part of our inspection entails what units need to be removed.
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The client was the owner of a multi-residential apartment unit.
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We started by sweeping away rocks on the flat roof to look for the potential causes of water that was leaking into the building.
20151119_135419 Roof Report, November 21 2015: Today the crew removed more gravel from the roof. A couple leaks were patched up. The site manager gave us the go-ahead to remove one unit from the roof. Roof Report, November 23 2015: Today we shoveled more rock from the roof to find more holes that needed patching. Once it started snowing, we covered the roof and shut down the site.
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We eventually found a few holes throughout the roof that needed patching.
Roof Report, November 25 2015: We removed the one unit that the building manager had requested to be taken off-site. We also started working on two drains but were later informed that the owners were having all the pipes replaced, including on the other two drains that we were not given permission to begin work on. The remaining two pipes were added to the work order and we will have to wait until they have completed the pipe replacement before proceedings.
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We removed a unit off-site at the building manager's request and patched over it.
Roof Report, November 26 2015: We are still waiting for the plumber so that we can proceed with the inspection and maintenance on the remaining two drains. This site should be completed on Saturday. Site Completion, November 30 2015: We finished the site today, on schedule. The remaining two drains were replaced, which we had to add to the original work order. Another possible leak location was sealed. As well, any metal that we removed from the walls was reinstalled. Another rooftop unit was disposed of, as well.
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First drain replacement, with coatings around the seams.
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We then sealed in the second newly installed drain pipe.
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After sealing a final possible leak location, we reinstalled the cap flashing that we had previously removed.
< End Report > CODE: 106A Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Residential EPDM Roof Replacement, October 2015, Edmonton

This client's home bears a low-slope roof that they wished for GRS to replace with an EPDM system. The crew of technicians went out to their location and completed the roof replacement in two days' work.   Materials List: October 13, 2015 Two technicians went out to the client's location and inspected the roof for what kind of deficiencies might be encountered during the roof replacement. During their inspection, they noted down the expected materials that would be required for the job.
  • 2x Rolls of EPDM
  • 7x Pails of EPDM bonding adhesive
  • 1x Pail of primer
  • 1x 6" roll of form flash
  • 2x Pipe boots
  • (84) 4' x 4' sheets of fiber board
  • 4x Roller cages and sleeves
  • 1x Box of seam tape
  Roof Report: October 16, 2015 The team arrived on site for 8:00am, and had their disposal bin arrive by 9:00. At that point, they were already underway ripping off the old roofing system and making good progress. It was after then that they found that there was no plywood with the order, just 2x6 boards. They departed to get the requisite plywood, and returned an hour later around noon. The boards were all mechanically fastened into place, with some of the EPDM laid atop it. The crew departed in the early evening, set to return the following day and focus on the remaining EPDM and metal flashing.
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The client had an EPDM roof, with the system going past its life cycle. Here is a torn section, with some cracking in the underlayment.
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We removed the existing EPDM system until the plywood was exposed. Many of the boards were either rotting or had holes in them.
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Rotted wood that had eventually given way, creating a prominent hole in the assembly.
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After installing new fiber boards over the assembly, we applied bonding adhesive to the underside of the EPDM.
    Roof Report: October 18 The reporting technicians notes were brief, but the site is now marked complete with the EPDM and flashing that was left over from the previous day's work. Everything went well and the roof was covered without any issue or hindrance of note.  
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Completed EPDM installation, with liquid rubber coatings applied over the seams.
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Newly installed edge flashing.
  CODE: 12936 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.  

Metal Siding Leak Inspection, September 2015, Edmonton

This client's commercial building bears a flat metal roofing system, but contacted GRS over some concerns that the metal siding around some windows on the upper level had leaked. GRS sent out one of its technicians to inspect the area and provide some advice on the repairs that could be carried out. Inspection Report: September 29, 2015 The technician went on-site and met with the client to discuss the problems with water ingress around the windows on an upper level of the building. They went out to the metal roof and began inspecting the windows and surrounding walls. The leaking areas became quite apparent, and the whole wall could use some patching. The reporting technician then suggested that every window's corners be treated with caulking to divert the water away from the metal edges. This is due to the water's current path, which is to run along the metal and behind the wall. Their estimate was that two crew members would be on-site for a half-day and use around eight tubes of caulking to properly seal the areas. This would, however, be a 'bandage' approach; the proper way to fix the problem would be to first remove the metal around the windows, cut back the wall metal, apply seam tape or spray foam between the metal and the wall, then replace the flashing that has degraded to this point.  
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The client reported water ingress around the windows on the upper levels of the building.
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While the sealant used around the sill had failed, and parts of the metal roof required patching, our technician suggested caulking applications around the corners such that it would divert water away from the existing coatings.
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Here is another example of a portion of the window where water was forming pockets. The rusting is characteristic of water pooling for extended periods of time on the sill, and slowly leaking into the building over time.
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There had also been some tearing at the end of the drip edge on the top of this window. Water had been entering through this hole.
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Some tearing in the metal siding on the roof had also been another potential leak entry point. The tearing had reached a point that the siding was becoming loose from the wall.
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Some components also required re-caulking around the base. Cracks in the old sealant had created small holes through which water could enter.
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There were also windows which had missing screws. Water had been entering the building through the screw holes.
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Another example of a piping penetration requiring sealing.
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While our technician was willing to apply a "bandage", the correct approach would have been to spray around the affected areas with foam or seam tape, and then reinstall new flashing.
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After addressing the windows, we did some water testing around the perimeter of the roof walls to make sure that the seams were watertight.
This report will continue to be updated if/as work proceeds on-site. CODE: 5604 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Edmonton PVC Narrow Roof Repair, September 2015, Edmonton

This client had GRS come out to carry out some repairs on the narrow flat edge around their home. The technicians affixed the PVC metal to the surface, welded it into place, and sealed everything before leaving the site complete. Roof Report: September 25, 2015 The team went out to the client's site for 8:00am and carried out the hazard assessment before making their way up to the roof. They started down by fastening PVC metal, and one of the crew members worked behind the other to clean it off with splice wash. The third crew member, working ahead of the two others, was cutting the PVC membrane into 6" strips. By 11:00am, they had finished with the metal work and started welding down the strips. Half an hour later the team left for lunch and got some caulking from a local store. Upon their return, one of the crew continued with welding, while the other two caulked around the site and shored up the watertight seals. By 3:30pm, they got the deck rails welded into place and completed the job. All in, 128' of PVC metal was fastened down, and 135' of 6" x 5' strips were welded into place. The job site is now complete, and the technicians departed without any issues.
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Our scope involved installing PVC metal to narrow flat roofing which ran the perimeter of the house.
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The metal was fastened by one crew member, followed by a splice wash application by another. Leading this process, a third technician cut and laid down 6" strips of PVC, which was welded on.
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The original roofing assembly had missing screws throughout the flashing, and blisters in the membrane.
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Many of the seams were also left exposed.
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After dealing with the new PVC installation, we began securing new pieces of flashing around the perimeter of the roof. Initially, there had been raised sections which were curling away from the assembly.
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Our inspection also uncovered some exposed screws and penetrations requiring new coatings around the base.
  < End Report > CODE: 14003 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Malarkey Legacy Shingles with Transition to Low Slope EPDM Roofing – Edmonton, September 2015

This Edmonton client's roof bears both a low slope EPDM and a sloped shingle system. GRS went out to their residential building to replace both surfaces over the course of a few days.  Continue reading Malarkey Legacy Shingles with Transition to Low Slope EPDM Roofing – Edmonton, September 2015

Edmonton Metal Roofing Repair Service Call, September 2015

This report covers the brief service call that GRS attended for one of our commercial clients requiring repairs on their metal roof. The service call lasted less than an hour, but the technicians still took notes on repairs made to the low-slope system. Continue reading Edmonton Metal Roofing Repair Service Call, September 2015

EPDM Roof Restoration with Liquid Rubber Coatings, September 2015, Edmonton

GRS first carried out an inspection and some light repairs on this commercial building's EPDM roof in April of 2012. There are two roofs in this system, one EPDM and one metal. We began working on the roof in September of 2015, proceeding with an engineered liquid rubber coating, on top of repairing any new fault areas that have developed since then. Check out this page for the original inspection information, though it may be referenced in some sections below.
Table of Contents:
Inspection
Scope of Work
Roof Reports [all 2015]
  Inspection: April 17, 2012 The original inspection is very thorough and worth reviewing. In summary, the EPDM and metal roof was suffering from some puncture holes, leaks, and membrane degradation. The structure itself is sound, but could use some maintenance to address then-current and future problems. Spot repairs could be carried out, or the roof could be recovered with a new watertight system (ie: liquid rubber).   Scope of Work: September 7, 2015 The crew made a list of things to present to the client, covering all of the pertinent safety information and everything needed to demonstrate that the scope of the project has been thoroughly considered. Below is a copy of everything they were prepared to cover.
Required on site to show HSE Manager:
  • GRS tool box documents
  • MSDS (attached)
  • WHIMIS tickets.
  • First aider with ticket
  • Fall arrest tickets
  • First aid kit
  • Pylons and caution tape for 6' control zone
  • Harnesses and ropes
  • Proper safety glasses
  • Steel toe boats (with green triangle symbol)
  • Long sleeve shirts
  • Gloves
 
Other:
  • Liquid rubber - 15 - 17 pails
  • Rollers, sleeves, brushes
  • Seam tape
  • Flashing mesh
  • Pressure washer, hose, electrical - be sure to advise office staff that roof may leak while washing.
  • Rags (materials to dry roof)
  • EPDM repair materials and tools
 
Notes:
  • Access to roof is with roof door - walk out on roof. Do not use ladders to access roof.
  Scope of Work:   Roof 1. EPDM ballast roof restoration. Approximately 36' x 50'
  • Remove rock ballast from half of EPDM roof
  • Wash EPDM roof membrane to white-glove clean
  • Repair EPDM as required
  • Coat half roof with liquid rubber (about 900 sq feet or 3 - 5 pails)
  • Return ballast to EPDM roof
  • Remove rock ballast from other half of EPDM roof
  • Wash EPDM roof membrane to white-glove clean
  • Repair EPDM as required
  • Coat half roof with liquid rubber (about 900 sq feet or 3 - 5 pails)
  • Return ballast to EPDM roof
  Roof 2. Metal Roof Coating. Approximately 56' x 50' Details first. Wash roof and/or internal gutters as required. Dry. Reinforce all your details with liquid rubber and/or seam tape or mesh as required before rolling out or spraying liquid rubber. Check all fasteners and replace as required or coat with liquid rubber. Check all rooftop penetrations, flashing, roof-to-wall connections, roof eave to gutter area, internal gutters and sheet metal connections, internal gutter to wall connections, and seams (especially horizontal) that may be separating. Clear old caulking etc. Add seam tape or mesh with liquid rubber. Coat complete metal roof, in gutters, and up parapet walls 30" in liquid rubber. Be sure to tape off a clean line at wall at a height of 30" or so - the line needs to be clean and straight. Pay close attention to internal gutters especially where sheet metal connects and where the internal gutter is at a vertical meeting the metal roof edge (that's where most leaks on these systems occur).  
Metal roof coating repair video and explanation of scope of work at this link:
  Roof Report: September 8, 2015 The team met in the morning for a brief safety meeting with the entire crew present. They then went up to the roof to begin moving the ballast from the west side onto the east side, preparing the area for cleaning. Using pressure washers to clean off the surface, the team found some difficulty with the amount of clay mixed in with the dirt. They sent one of the technicians out to pick up more scrub pads that could handle the tougher soil. Heavy rain began rolling in, so the team had to depart a little bit early. Half of the roof is cleaned off and prepared for the following day's application of liquid rubber. Plan for September 9: Arrive for 7:00am, and put down the first layer of liquid rubber on the now-complete half of the roof. While it cures, the second half of the roof will be prepared for the same.  
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Puncture hole around the detailing of a ventilation unit.
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Pressure washers were used to clean the surface, which was covered in a mixture of clay and dirt.
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Scrub pads were used to remove the remaining soil. After the roof was dirt-free, we gave it a final wash.
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We had to shut the site down when heavy rain began to roll in. Half of the roof was cleared and now prepared for liquid rubber applications.
    Roof Report: September 9, 2015 The GRS crew arrived on site for 6:45am, and had their toolbox meeting for fifteen minutes until the client arrived to grant access to the roof. They began by clearing off the residual moisture and prepared to apply the liquid rubber to half of the EPDM roof. In the meanwhile, the other part of the team was at the shop picking up another six buckets of the liquid rubber solution. By the time they'd returned, the first team kept cleaning the metal roof. Half of the metal roof had liquid rubber applied to it, and the technicians kept preparing the gutter and sidewalls for recovery. Once the west side of the EPDM roof had cured, the crew moved the ballast back from the east side. They kept preparing and cleaning the east side for tomorrow's application of liquid rubber, as some rainfall prevented them from more liquid rubber application. Both the EPDM and metal roofs have been half-completed with liquid rubber, with the other half prepared for the following day's work. The customer also reported a heavy leak, which was traced and temporarily patched until it can be addressed at-length.
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Completed liquid rubber coatings on one of the metal roofs.
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Clearing away residual moisture and ballast rocks from the other half of the EPDM roof.
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Detailing around the rooftop units also required new coatings, with cracks forming around the corners.
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After cleaning the remaining portion of the metal roof, a second team of technicians completed the coatings after preparing the gutter and sidewalls for recovery.
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Various rooftop appliances also required coatings around their bases.
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Once the EPDM had cured, we applied liquid rubber to half of the roof which had previously been covered in residual moisture.
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The parapet walls were inspected for various deficiencies, such as punctures and pockets formed at the wall connections.
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Initial patch applied to the detailing around a rooftop unit on the metal roof.
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Remaining half of the metal roof to be recovered.
  Roof Report: September 10, 2015 Work began on the roof around 6:45am, where the team got to cleaning the EPDM roof in preparation for more liquid rubber. Everything was cleaned and prepared for 10:00am, and after a brief coffee break one technician got to applying the rubber solution to the ribs of the metal roof while another applied it to the EPDM. The two remaining crew mates finished up the mesh and detail work on the metal roof, working through 12:30pm until lunch. Resuming at 1:00, they all continued with their assigned tasks until the metal roof was done around 3:00pm. The EPDM roof has a 5' x 36' section still requiring ballast removal, cleaning, and liquid rubber application. It's expected that the work will be finished tomorrow.
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After clearing the ballast rocks from the other half of the EPDM roof, we again had to wash off the clay/dirt mixtures from the surface.
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After washing the detritus, the surface was nearly ready for liquid rubber coatings. Scrub pads were used to remove any remaining buildups. One 5' x 36' section of ballast was still remaining, as well.
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Concurrently, another technician applied coatings to the remaining metal roof's ribs.
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Completed liquid rubber recovery to an EPDM roof.
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Completed metal roof.
    Roof Report: September 11, 2015 The crew arrived on site for 7:30am, and got to cleaning the remaining section of the EPDM roof. By the time they took a break around 10:10am the roof was clean and ready for the liquid rubber. They performed a leak test on the second roof, and made sure that there was no water ingress to the offices below. Once confirmed, they prepared the breather holes on the metal roof's ribbing with mesh and rubber. Lunch break went from 11:30 - 12:00pm, and the EPDM roof was finished shortly after. The rubber has to cure before the ballast can be replaced, so the team moved on to the metal roof to continue adhering the mesh and rubber to the ribbing. Come 2:40pm, they had the site cleaned up and marked the job complete. < End Report >   CODE: 6621 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.  

Low Slope Roofing Repair, Edmonton September 2015

This client's flat roofing has a leak in need of repair, so we sent out a crew to inspect the wear and tear to the existing system. This is an ongoing project that will be updated as more reports come in. Continue reading Low Slope Roofing Repair, Edmonton September 2015

Flat Roofing Replacement, August 2015, Edmonton

The following report covers an ongoing file in which GRS is to replace a commercial client's flat roofing system. The article will be updated with an inspection and in-progress photos as they come in. Continue reading Flat Roofing Replacement, August 2015, Edmonton