Nisku Commercial Roof Inspection, July 2012

This commercial client required options ranging from roof repairs to full replacement. Our project manager provided a quotation with all of the various options that were available. This report briefly outlines the pre-quote inspection. Inspection, July 25, 2012: This is a tar and gravel roof which has plies that are exposed and deteriorating, as well as soft spots throughout the roof. There are multiple buckles and blisters. There are two areas roofed in with SBS Modified Bitumen. The roof over the office is SBS and it has buckles along the complete length of it. I recommend that the roof be replaced or a recovery system be installed. In the event of a recovery, some area may require replacement of insulation. The buckles on the torch-on roof need to be cut and patched. IMG1343250136427 IMG1343250161465 IMG1343250267254 IMG1343250095932 < End Report > CODE: 1609 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Edmonton Commercial Flat Roof Inspection, August 2011

This report follows an initial inspection for a commercial client requiring a roof replacement. Also included is a correspondence sent to the client by our project manager. Inspection, August 19, 2011: This roof is accessible by hatch. The current roof system is tar and gravel and is experiencing multiple leaks. Upon inspection I found approximately twenty blisters, numerous spots of surface erosion, and sealants cracking around vents. The client would like a quote for replacement. He will be removing the outside lighting which is set on the parapet walls, but would like us to remove the satellite dish.
The following email was sent to the client by our project manager:
Good morning,
Please find attached the pricing you requested, sorry about the delay - if there is any problem opening the attached let me know and I will resend in a different format.
The documentation and internet links in the attached report detail our; Workmanship Guarantee, System Options and Methods, Credentials, 2011 Schedule Availability, Links to Manufacturers, GRS Project Portfolio and Clients, etc.
Beyond attempting repairs, there are two different methods to do your roof.
One method is to rip the old roof off (a complete replacement) and the other is a new Roof Recovery System.
A Roof Recovery would have our crew scraping the gravel off, taking the old membrane and soaked insulation off (as required only) and then mechanically attaching a fiber board and putting a new roof over top (SBS Torch On, Tar and Gravel Mop On, EPDM, TPO, or PVC per quote).
Typically a roof recovery is what is done. A roof recovery is less intrusive, it is more environmentally friendly as the old bitumen layers don't end up in the land fill, the old system also has an inherent R Value of usually around 7, it is less costly, and the life-cycle is the same as a complete replacement.
However, if you find that you want or are required to completely remove the old system down to the substrate (the sheathing or metal Q deck), we can accommodate this and the pricing is included in the attached documentation also.
Additionally, there are a number of different membranes available, which I've detailed in the quote. Essentially, it comes down to 1) A traditional 4ply mop on tar and gravel (BUR), 2) 2ply SBS Mod Bit (torch down or cold apply), or 3) Single ply; black rubber membrane (EPDM) or a white membrane (TPO or PVC) depending on whether you want to draw the sun in or not. EPDM, TPO, PVC are available in multiple colors, however EPDM out of the box is typically black and TPO / PVC are typically white.
Single ply systems are what are being installed more and more now (for GRS singly ply is about 80%), however, we install all system types. I would encourage you to consider the life-cycle costing and maintenance / repair benefits of a single ply system prior to choosing a system.
Have a read and let us know what you think - I know there is a lot of information so I'm sure you will have questions.
Thanks for the opportunity to quote - it is very much appreciated!
< End Report > CODE: 11361 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Edmonton Flat BUR Roof Repair and Maintenance, September 2010

This Edmonton client required repairs to an existing built up roof system. Some areas on the roof appear to be blistering and others have ponding water. A crew was dispatched to perform the repairs once the weather was suitable. Note: This report contains several separate repairs and maintenance reports completed at different times.
Scope of Work: Repairs to Existing BUR – Built Up Roof System.
  • 7 areas of the roof have blistering that requires repair.
  • 3 areas of the roof have ponding that requires repair.
  • 2 units show water penetration to the interior.
001
Some blistering in the roof around ventilation vents, with signs of moisture buildup.
002
Exposed blistering sticking through the gravel layer.
003
Holes in the base of a plumbing vent. During periods of precipitation, water has a direct point of entry into the building through holes such as these.
004
Significant signs of moisture buildup lead from evaporated standing water.
005
We removed the gravel around sections of significant moisture buildup to expose the roof surface. We found small pockets of waterpooling, which was also entering the building through the various blisters and tears that were identified.
008
Spudding over some tears.
007
Parts of the underlay that bordered with the edge of the shingle roof section were curling up, and required refastening. Moisture was entering the building through here.
010
Cement was applied over the sections of the roof where we had found significant standing water.
013
For smaller holes and blistering, we applied spudding, mesh over top, and then followed up with a second layer of spud.
  Roof Report, January 28, 2011: Investigated roof leak, approximately 18" frozen snow on roof. Checked all repairs done previously and no deficiencies could be found. Possible leak area (small leak now, did not show for 6 months) could only be related to metal flashing/roof flashing interface, which right now is frozen together.
I told our site contact that as soon as we have a good break in the weather we would be back to source the leak. She also asked me to check how the drains were, which were exposed and working fine. The client then showed me interior cracks in her ceiling, which with the amount of snow on the roof are more than likely due to extra weight on roof.  She told me their condo board has no money to pay for snow removal and they would take care of it themselves.
Annual Maintenance Follow-up, April 25, 2012: Arriving on site we walked around the building to look for any signs of potential problems ie. open mortar joints and general degradation, and nothing stood out. As we entered the premises interior ceilings and walls did not show any signs of water damage/problems.  Once we proceeded to the roof there was nothing that stood out. Closer examination showed some caulking drying up and cracking. We proceeded to caulk all units/protrusion on the roof and also caulked all seams and screws on the parapet flashing. There were a few minor repairs needed near the scuppers. We used MS Detail to do these repairs. Otherwise the BUR portion of the roof showed no signs of any deficiencies, such as blistering or ridging etc. Once the body of the roof was inspected for these deficiencies we then proceeded to broom the entire roof.  We would level out gravel where the wind around some units would push the rocks away and create a bare spot which would be open to exposure/ UV rays. Then we leveled out the gravel on the entire roof looking for low spot and making sure they were covered. There are only two areas of concern.  The first is the shingles under the scuppers; they are badly worn and are in need of replacement. The second is the gyp rock cover the hatch door. It came off when we opened the hatch, we would have fixed it but it had been re-screwed back on so many times that the edges of the gyp rock were nothing but torn paper. There were several different types of nails and screws around the edge to further indicate it was repaired many times. Roof Report, June 20, 2012:
Removed 18 inches of gravel around vent. The plys are wet and soft so we applied 12" of plastic cement around.
IMAG0271
The ply around the vents were wet, soft, and coming apart.
IMAG0273
12" of plastic cement was applied around the base.
Annual Maintenance Follow-up, January 30, 2014:
An email sent from our project manager to the client:
Hi, Our report, that was copied to you, determined that there are a number of areas of concern that will cause leaks; 1. Areas such as the caulking on the heat stacks (you don't need to call anyone to replace heat stacks) - maintenance issue. 2. Ice damming glacier effect - again maintenance. The previous repairs are not the issue. You have a failed roof that is going to fail in a number of areas at any time, as with this report. When the roof fails the leaks will manifest on the inside at the lowest points, the same points as always because water finds the lowest point in that area and manifests. Did you want a work order to have repairs done? Thanks
20140128_151001
Some of the rooftop appliances, such as the base of this heat stack, required re-caulking around its seams.
20140128_151237
Some of the rooftop units also had some tears along the termination bar which required resealing.
20140128_151456
Exposed pocket adjacent to a piece of edge flashing. When ice damming melts, the water has a clear point of entry into the building through sections such as this.
20140128_151422
Ice buildup directly facing an exposed section of the roof edge. We advised the client that without certain parts of the assembly being replaced, water would eventually leak into the building once the snow and ice melted.
 
 This project may be updated at a later date.
< End Report > CODE: 10737 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.