Metal Siding Leak Inspection, September 2015, Edmonton

This client's commercial building bears a flat metal roofing system, but contacted GRS over some concerns that the metal siding around some windows on the upper level had leaked. GRS sent out one of its technicians to inspect the area and provide some advice on the repairs that could be carried out. Inspection Report: September 29, 2015 The technician went on-site and met with the client to discuss the problems with water ingress around the windows on an upper level of the building. They went out to the metal roof and began inspecting the windows and surrounding walls. The leaking areas became quite apparent, and the whole wall could use some patching. The reporting technician then suggested that every window's corners be treated with caulking to divert the water away from the metal edges. This is due to the water's current path, which is to run along the metal and behind the wall. Their estimate was that two crew members would be on-site for a half-day and use around eight tubes of caulking to properly seal the areas. This would, however, be a 'bandage' approach; the proper way to fix the problem would be to first remove the metal around the windows, cut back the wall metal, apply seam tape or spray foam between the metal and the wall, then replace the flashing that has degraded to this point.  
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The client reported water ingress around the windows on the upper levels of the building.
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While the sealant used around the sill had failed, and parts of the metal roof required patching, our technician suggested caulking applications around the corners such that it would divert water away from the existing coatings.
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Here is another example of a portion of the window where water was forming pockets. The rusting is characteristic of water pooling for extended periods of time on the sill, and slowly leaking into the building over time.
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There had also been some tearing at the end of the drip edge on the top of this window. Water had been entering through this hole.
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Some tearing in the metal siding on the roof had also been another potential leak entry point. The tearing had reached a point that the siding was becoming loose from the wall.
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Some components also required re-caulking around the base. Cracks in the old sealant had created small holes through which water could enter.
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There were also windows which had missing screws. Water had been entering the building through the screw holes.
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Another example of a piping penetration requiring sealing.
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While our technician was willing to apply a "bandage", the correct approach would have been to spray around the affected areas with foam or seam tape, and then reinstall new flashing.
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After addressing the windows, we did some water testing around the perimeter of the roof walls to make sure that the seams were watertight.
This report will continue to be updated if/as work proceeds on-site. CODE: 5604 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

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