Metal Siding Leak Inspection, September 2015, Edmonton

This client's commercial building bears a flat metal roofing system, but contacted GRS over some concerns that the metal siding around some windows on the upper level had leaked. GRS sent out one of its technicians to inspect the area and provide some advice on the repairs that could be carried out. Inspection Report: September 29, 2015 The technician went on-site and met with the client to discuss the problems with water ingress around the windows on an upper level of the building. They went out to the metal roof and began inspecting the windows and surrounding walls. The leaking areas became quite apparent, and the whole wall could use some patching. The reporting technician then suggested that every window's corners be treated with caulking to divert the water away from the metal edges. This is due to the water's current path, which is to run along the metal and behind the wall. Their estimate was that two crew members would be on-site for a half-day and use around eight tubes of caulking to properly seal the areas. This would, however, be a 'bandage' approach; the proper way to fix the problem would be to first remove the metal around the windows, cut back the wall metal, apply seam tape or spray foam between the metal and the wall, then replace the flashing that has degraded to this point.  
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The client reported water ingress around the windows on the upper levels of the building.
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While the sealant used around the sill had failed, and parts of the metal roof required patching, our technician suggested caulking applications around the corners such that it would divert water away from the existing coatings.
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Here is another example of a portion of the window where water was forming pockets. The rusting is characteristic of water pooling for extended periods of time on the sill, and slowly leaking into the building over time.
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There had also been some tearing at the end of the drip edge on the top of this window. Water had been entering through this hole.
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Some tearing in the metal siding on the roof had also been another potential leak entry point. The tearing had reached a point that the siding was becoming loose from the wall.
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Some components also required re-caulking around the base. Cracks in the old sealant had created small holes through which water could enter.
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There were also windows which had missing screws. Water had been entering the building through the screw holes.
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Another example of a piping penetration requiring sealing.
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While our technician was willing to apply a "bandage", the correct approach would have been to spray around the affected areas with foam or seam tape, and then reinstall new flashing.
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After addressing the windows, we did some water testing around the perimeter of the roof walls to make sure that the seams were watertight.
This report will continue to be updated if/as work proceeds on-site. CODE: 5604 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Liquid Rubber, Tank Waterproofing June 3 2015

Article: Liquid Rubber - Tank Waterproofing. Killam, Alberta. Oil and Gas. Industrial.

Liquid rubber is a product that we use extensively on commercial and industrial metal roof systems and gutters to waterproof them from rain and ice damming.

Liquid rubber can also be used to waterproof foundations, canals, ponds, tanks, RV's, gutters, pipelines, park structures and has numerous other residential, commercial and industrial applications. Mining, oil and gas, marine and agricultural applications are numerous.

There are various grades of liquid rubber and it can be rolled, brushed or sprayed on.

This field report is from our liquid rubber crew that were waterproofing tanks at an oil and gas facility in Alberta.

For more information visit our main web site page on liquid rubber.

May 11, 2015: Liquid Rubber Waterproofing Crew Attends to Site. 930 am arrive on site. We started on tank one. One part of the crew started shoveling out the sand which was 2 feet deep in spots and preparing the tank and outer ring for rubber. Once they had the sand shoveled back and the entire outer ring exposed we the then cleaned it with wire brushes and cleaner - this process took the crew until 3 pm. At 3 pm we started to lay in the scrim sheet and apply liquid rubber to the tank and outer ring. This process took the crew to 5:30 pm. The other portion of the crew did the inside portion of the tank - the containment section of the tank. We had to clean all the dirt up and then began scrubbing the floors and around the penetrations and perimeter. This portion of the work was done at 130 pm. Once the containment area was clean we applied seam tape along the perimeter and around all penetrations. We also had to seal off the two corners using scrim sheet and liquid rubber. After that was done we used 3 ft x 1.5 ft strips of scrim sheet to seal the tank to the concrete floor. We then coated the entire floor and applied the coating up the walls one foot. This portion of the work scope was done at 430 pm. We then helped the other part of our crew finish the outer section of the tank The site is now 50% complete and will be finished tomorrow. Man hours on cleaning and prep scope so far is 19 man hours. Man hours logged on site in total today - 46 man hours with drive time Material used 2 pails of Liquid Rubber. 1/2 roll of 3 feet mesh. 1 box of rags. 1 gallon of cleaner. 4 brushes.
Liquid Rubber - Outer ring of tank cleared and coating applied to tank.
Liquid Rubber - Outer ring of tank cleared and coating applied to tank.
Liquid Rubber - mesh applied to edge of tank and concrete foundation.
Liquid Rubber - mesh applied to edge of tank and concrete foundation.
Liquid Rubber - coating applied to substrate (concrete foundation)
Liquid Rubber - coating applied to substrate (concrete foundation)
Liquid Rubber - Seam tape applied to penetrations.
Liquid Rubber - Seam tape applied to penetrations.
Liquid Rubber - preparation of site.
Liquid Rubber - preparation of site.
Liquid Rubber Waterproofing - Staff applying liquid rubber to outside of tank.
Liquid Rubber Waterproofing - Staff applying liquid rubber to outside of tank.
Liquid Rubber - mesh and liquid rubber applied to outer ring of tank.
Liquid Rubber - mesh and liquid rubber applied to outer ring of tank.

May 12, 2015: Crew attends for second day of work on site.

8 am arrive on site.

We started with prepping the outer portion of the tank and ring by cleaning the tank with cleaner and outer ring as well. There wasn't extensive prep time for this - it looked like someone did half of it for us (the cleaning wasn't in our original scope so our client likely had staff attend to this). After it was all prepped the crew sealed the tank to the outer ring with scrim sheet and then coated it with liquid rubber.

We then focused on the inner part of the tank and containment enclosure. We vacuumed the dirt and scrubbed the floor and tank. After that we used 6 inch and four inch seam tape to seal in all the penetrations and perimeter of enclosure (which isn't easy - it's really tight quarters).

After the seam tape was done we then vacuumed again. Once the area was clean we used scrimmage sheets to seal the tank to the concrete foundation essentially creating a tub. We then coated everything with brush.  The customer very satisfied with finally having a solution and our work.

3rd tank. At first our customer put the 3rd tank off and said they weren't doing it, but now they want it done and they estimate that it will be ready for next Thursday.

Total man hours for prep and cleaning was 31 hours.

Total hours spent on site including drive time 78 hours.

Material used today. 3 pails of LR 1 roll of scrim sheet 3 feet long. 1 roll of 6 inch scrim sheet. 1 roll of 6 inch seam tape. 1 roll of 4 inch seam tape. 1 box of rags. 2 gallon of splice wash. 8 paint brushes.

May 22, 2015: Crew Re-attends for Scope of Work on Tank 3. 

Scope of work for third tank:
  1. Clean tank and outer ring to white glove state apply LR and mesh to seal tank to outer ring.
  2. Inner containment area. Clean tank and floor seal the floor to tank and up wall of containment area
Man hours 40 with drive time Materials 1 roll of 3ft mesh 2 pails of LR brush grade Rags 1 gallon of splice wash 4 brushes

6:30 am left Edmonton. 9 am arrive on site. We started the first part of the crew on the inner containment area. We started by cleaning the area with splice wash. Once it was clean we then used seam tape to seal in the perimeter and used mesh to seal in tank to the concrete footing. Once that was complete we then coated it with Liquid Rubber.

The second part of the crew then focused on the the outer tank and ring. We cleaned it and shoveled out some dirt in areas to make it level. We then used 3 foot pieces of mesh to seal the outer ring to the tank. As we were applying our Liquid Rubber at 2:30 the other part of the crew came to help us out and finish this tank. It was 2 x the size of the other tanks so the outer portion took a bit longer.

Applying Liquid Rubber to outter ring
Applying Liquid Rubber to outer ring
Completed liquid Rubber job on outter ring of tank.
Completed liquid Rubber job on outer ring of tank.
  Other Photos:  
CONTACT US
Call our 24 Hour Emergency Roof Repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5.
For all other areas of Canada call 1.877.497.3528 Toll Free.
We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.
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Edmonton Emergency Roof Repair Inspection, November 2012

This client's residential building required emergency repairs to their sloped shingle roof. They had our emergency crew come out to perform an inspection, for which we delivered a quotation afterwards.   Emergency Inspection: November 17, 2012 One of the GRS technicians went on location to inspect damages to the roof and prepare a report that might be used for quotation on the services. They took some photos and notes, confirming that a man-lift will be needed as the building is four storeys tall. The roof is fairly steep, as the photos indicate. photo (19) photo (18) photo (15) photo (16) photo (17)       Quotation Delivered: November 17, 2012 We sent over a quote for emergency repair services, including the required 'extras' such as the man-lift and any materials necessary. This article will be updated if the client elects to continue with the GRS service and book our technicians for repairs.     CODE: 17459 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.  

Shake Roof Inspection, September 2011, Edmonton

This brief report outlines GRS' contact with a client that has an aging cedar shake roof that is in need of replacement. GRS sent out a technician to inspect the site and take measurements to see exactly what kind of shape the roof is in, and how much material will be needed to carry out the service. Continue reading Shake Roof Inspection, September 2011, Edmonton