Edmonton Industrial Low-Slope Roof Repair, October 2011

The below is a summary of repairs carried out at an industrial business in Edmonton, AB. Having a low-slope roof with apparent water ingress, the client reached out to GRS to provide quotation on temporary repairs or re-roofing the entire system. Our team went out to the client's location to perform an assessment that might be used in a quotation for their roofing problems. We found that the low-slope roof had six penetrations, several of which were damaged (either bent, or losing their seal). It appears that they had already attempted a temporary fix with some tape, but the seams were wearing through already. Inside the warehouse there were some cracks in the ceiling that needed examining, and there was some minor concerns regarding the gutters (slightly askew). We photographed the location and provided quotation for temporary repairs or roof replacement services. The client elected for the repairs at this moment, so we scheduled a time for our crew to return to the site.   Update (October 19, 2011): With the work order submitted, we sent one of our crew members back to the warehouse to perform the spot repairs on the roof. The entire repair took just over three hours to complete, and required minimal materials to carry out.   DSCF0446 DSCF0447 DSCF0448 DSCF0449 DSCF0450 DSCF0451 DSCF0452 DSCF0453 DSCF0454 DSCF0455 DSCF0456 DSCF0457 DSCF0458 DSCF0459 DSCF0460 DSCF0461 DSCF0462 DSCF0463 DSCF0464 DSCF0465 DSCF0466 DSCF0467 DSCF0468 DSCF0469 DSCF0470 DSCF0471   CODE: 53030 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Shingles Replacement and Plumbing/Ventilation Maintenance in Edmonton AB, July to August 2011

Below you will find a series of quotations and field reports from our Edmonton roofing repair crew. Our existing client approved our consultation for a full shingle replacement, system maintenance, and waterproofing. Quotation Request Received, July 28 2011: The client asked me to assess all five buildings in the condominium complex and give my recommendations for  each one. There are three 6-unit buildings and two 4-unit buildings. There is also a garage in the rear of the properties. I have attached the dimensions for each building.
Condo unit dimensions, plus garage
Dimensions for the condominium units and garage.
Note as well that there are 4' x 5' flat galvanized metal roofs above each entrance, but they do not require any attention at this time. Repair Assessment FIRST SET The units are past due for a re-roofing. The shingles on the bottom have not been functional for quite some time which has resulted in the roof deck rotting in some areas. The extent of the damage caused by the rot will not be known until we strip the shingles off. The flashing has also become loose, lifting up high enough away from the roofing that rain could easily blow in and damage the interior. I recommend a roof replacement as soon as possible.
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Condo side-view
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Condo front-view
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Weathered shingles
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Shingle assessment
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Flat portion assessment
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Cracked shingling
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Weathered shingles
  Materials required for low-slope application:
  • 41 shingles
  • 125 ft. cap
  • 314 ft. starter/drip
  • 18x 44 in. Ice & Water
  • 6x whirlybirds
  • 12x air vents
  • 6x 4 in. plumbing boots
  • 6x 6" x 4" plumbing pipe
SECOND SET This next unit is also due for a re-roofing, although it is not as urgent as the first. There is no evidence of rotting roof deck, but we will not know for sure until the roof is stripped. The flashing is also becoming loose, but not as bad as the first. I recommend it [the roof] be replaced this season. Materials required for low-slope application:
  • 28 shingles
  • 85 ft. cap
  • 234 ft. starter/drip
  • 13x 44 in. Ice & Water
  • 6x whirlybirds
  • 8x air vents
  • 4x 4 in. plumbing boots
  • 4x 6" x 4" plumbing pipe
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Past due on maintenance
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Cracking shingles
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More shingles requiring replacement
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Rear-view of another condo unit
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Condo side-view
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Front view
  THIRD SET This is a newer roof but it needs some attention. There are many shingles that need to be replaced to bring it back to a reasonable condition. There is also one chimney cap missing on this building. Materials:
  • 5x bundles BP 2-tone grey
  • 6x tubes Karnak
  • 1x 6 in. chimney cap
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Rear-view of condos
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Condo backyard
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Evident wear-and-tear
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Wear-and-tear by the gutters
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Odd shingle out
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Damage attributed to rotting wood
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Cracked roofing
  FOURTH SET Unit in relatively good shape with only a few shingles requiring replacement. Materials:
  • 1x bundle BP 2-tone grey
  • 2x tubes Karnak
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Torn shingles
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Needs replacing!
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Base view
  FIFTH SET The last building I assessed has had its roof replaced at some point but it is already showing signs of deterioration beyond repair. There is too much damage (especially on the bottom portion) to begin repairing it efficiently. One of the whirlybirds has lots several of its mounting screws and now the top portion of it is broken. I recommend that the entire roof be replaced in the near future. Materials required for low-slope application:
  • 41 shingles
  • 125 ft. cap
  • 314 ft. starter/drip
  • 18x 44 in. Ice & Water
  • 6x whirlybirds
  • 12x air vents
  • 6x 4 in. plumbing boots
  • 6x 6" x 4" plumbing pipe
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Damaged whirlybird
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In need of immediate maintenance
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Impeding water run-off
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Edge view
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Possible candidates for wood rot
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Torn shingles
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More torn shingles
Client Provided with Quotation, August 3 2011:
  • Remove shingles; dispose and apply new roofing
  • Types: architectural shingles, premium SBS modified shingles, premium slate/shake, metal/rubber/concrete
  • Venting correction
  • High profile shingle cap
  • Premium 44" Ice & Water protection: includes valleys, neck tie roof openings
  • Coloured flashings: drip edge, gable edge, valley, vents, walls
  • Complete roof underlayment wrap
  • Storm nailing and installation
  • Premium caulking: under vents, exposed nails, valleys, etc.
  • Replacement of rotted roof sheathing
Client approves the work on August 9 2011, crew begins on August 10 2011: The crew went around the roof and picked out all of the damaged shingles. There were a couple of pin-holed shingles as well. It was found that Ice & Water was used under the roof as underlayment. Everything that the crew removed was replaced. The same procedure was followed for the second complex. The shingles up for removal were sealed together very well, so when we applied more force, entire segments ripped off.
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Removing shingles in large segments
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Torn flashing and vent systems requiring maintenance
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Newer roofing system already experiencing weather damage
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Recommended a full replacement
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Top flat roof view
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More shingle removal
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Shingle removal from edges
  When the crew had finished ripping off the shingling on the west side of the sixth unit, we had to waterproof it. It was found that the roof was plank-based, rather than using sheeting. Rotten wood was also found that required replacement (an 8 ft. section). The remaining planks had their nails removed. Once preparation was complete, Ice & Water was applied to the base for waterproofing. The pallets for the east side were delivered later in the afternoon. Weather permitting, we will complete this site tomorrow.  
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Shingles fully removed
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This is what a bare roof looks like
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Cut-out for whirlybird
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Insulated roof
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Plumbing boot reinstalled
August 12, 2011: With respect to unit 6, we started ripping up shingles while concurrently working on plumbing stack penetrations. The penetrations were tarred and neck tied. Concurrently, re-shingled portions of the roof were waterproofed. There was no more rotten wood found. Our compressor stopped working near the end of cap placement. Hand nailing was our only option. Other than that, the day went as planned.
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Weatherproofing ventilation base
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Covering up punctures from the old shingle system
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Plumbing boot installation
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Weatherproofing the ventilation systems
100_1462   August 16, 2011: Remaining shingles on the east side were removed and no more rotten wood has been found on the units. Waterproofing continued and we began waste removal; the garbage bin had arrived in the morning. The crew is ready to begin roofing in the morning. August 17, 2011: West side shingles were removed today, but we got rained out while trying to take off the flashing from the sidings. Installation of replacement shingles began.
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Installing new shingles
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Old shingles undergoing removal
100_1466 August 18, 2011 One of the plumbing stacks came too far out from the roof for the plumbing boot to fit. A crewman was sent back to the shop to get two high dome boots, so we kept putting the PVC pipes in. Two whirlybirds were also cut in and installed. We will complete this site tomorrow around the afternoon.
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Plumbing boot installation
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We had to re-size some segments
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Preparing to install ventilation system
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Installed
  Site Completition, August 19 2011: Last two whirlybirds installed and all penetrations completed. As predicted, job site was completed around the afternoon after cleanup and remaining shingles were installed.
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Wind turbine preparation work
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New wind turbines installed
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Completed roof
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One side finished
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Closeup of a wind turbine reinstallation
100_1494   < End Report > Code: 133 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Leduc Liquid Rubber Roof Recovery, August 2011

The report below follows the several visits that GRS made to this industrial client's building. Repairs were carried out on a handful of occasions, with a liquid rubber roof recovery performed as well. Continue reading Leduc Liquid Rubber Roof Recovery, August 2011

Snow Removal and Roof Replacement in Edmonton AB, 2011

Below you will find a report and quotation for an ongoing commercial client in Edmonton, Alberta from our roofing repair crew. The first is a winter call for snow removal, the second is for a summer call inquiring after a roof replacement. More reports and photos will be posted as they become available Assessment, January 18 2011: Scupper drains on the north and south sides were blocked with ice (frozen drain pipe). I suggested to disconnect the pipe, clean the ice out of the scupper, and clean the snow from the roof. There are a lot of safe areas to throw snow from, so this should be an easy snow removal. Field Report, January 19 2011: We arrived at 8:30 am and removed approximately 6000 sq. ft. of snow from the flat roof. The ice from the two scupper drains was also cleaned and we applied ice melt. When the winter season was finished, the client called us back for a roof replacement quotation. Quotation, July 31 2011:
  • Immediate Repairs Required to Tar and Gravel Flat Roof Link
  • Replacement (retro fit) of Front Entry Roof
Replacement Options Link Retro Fit / Overlay Options Link
  • EPDM Link
  • TPO or PVC Link
  • Re Coat of Hot Tar or Coat of Cold Application Emulsion & Repairs Link
  • Spray on SPF (Top Coating add 1.00 – 2.00 per sq) Link
  • Metal Panels (Corrugated, Ribbed, or Standing Seam) Link
  • TOUGH ROOF
Roof Flashing (if they cannot be re-used)
System Application Reference Online Links: http://www.grscanadainc.com/Flat_Roofing.html http://www.grscanadainc.com/Maintenance_and_Repairs.html   Warranty: Manufacturer Warranty As Applicable. Workmanship Guarantee: GRS Lifetime Unconditional Workmanship Guarantee. Technical Service: 24 Hr - 7 Day – 365 Day Per Year Technical Service. Credentials: Licensed, Soprema PAQ S Advanced Certified, WCB, 5,000,000.00 Commercial Liability Insurance, Safety Program Exceeds Provincial Standard. Work Duration: Repairs 2 days. Replacement 9 – 12 days. Retrofit 5 – 8 days. 2011 Crew Schedule Availability: April 26, May 10, 24, June 13, July 26, 2011 Sample References / Portfolio: http://www.grscanadainc.com/Project_Portfolio.html
< End Report > Code: 156 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Commercial Roof Maintenance and Repair in Edmonton AB, January to June 2011

Below you will find a series of reports from the roofing repair crew from the period of January to June for a large commercial client in Edmonton, Alberta. From snow removal to PVC maintenance, the often large time-spans between work is evidenced by weather conditions and their effects on structural integrity. January 22 2011: The entire day was spent shoveling snow in preparation of a leak assessment. Service call, February 8 2011:
Your contact is the facility manager and expects a service call prior to servicing the leaks. Before any future work is performed, a quote must be done unless it is with respect to repairs from shoveling. Note that one of our workers said there is a section that needs repair from a leak that was not caused by our shoveling.
There had been sub-zero conditions in Edmonton that month. We provided the client with an update when the weather was beginning to become favourable. February 27 2011:
As you know, we had temporarily sealed the various points where leakage was occurring as well as spots where we noticed tears. We have also received the Sarnafil that we had special ordered for your site. The next step is to wait the sub-zero weather out and get the Sarnafil patches welded on to permanently seal the deficiencies. In these temperatures that we are currently experience, the cold may prevent proper adhesion. We would rather wait it out than have to come back for another visit. If you need any further clarification, please give us a shout. We will give you a call before arrival, at any rate.
Field Report, March 18 2011: We repaired the leaks right before the afternoon broke out. Any patches that required maintenance were also attended to.
IKEA (2)
We patched over the tears that had accumulated alongside the seams.
IKEA (3)
Closeup of the patch, with some staining around it. The stains are indicative of longterm moisture buildup or standing water.
IKEA
The base of a gas appliance had a few holes as well, which we patched over.
More problems, April 19 2011:
I just got off the phone with the facility manager and he said that leaking has begun again. He believes it is in a different spot, since the leaks are exiting from the carpentry shop about 30 ft. to 40 ft. from the roof hatch.
In the meantime, a PVC repair was also added to the invoice. The weather did not let up until June. PVC Repair, June 1 2011: We called the facility manager and arrived to the facility at 10:45 am. The PVC membrane top-side is damaged in three areas and requires approximately 16 ft. cover strips to repair it. < End Report > Code: IK Call our 24 Hour Emergency Roof Repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. For all other areas of Canada call 1.877.497.3528 Toll Free. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Edmonton EPDM Roof Replacement, May 2011

Below you will find a series of reports pertaining to a residential client in need of some work to their roof. They sought an EPDM installation with some retro-fitting/installation of skylights, gutters, and downpipes. After receiving our quotes for services to be tendered, the client was interested in an EPDM re-roof with some additional features to be installed during the project (skylights, gutters, downpipes). Our quote, however, assumed that insulation would need to be entirely removed and replaced, which was not the case. We re-quoted the job (with minimal insulation work) and advised the client on the warranties available for materials and workmanship. Assessment, April 29 2011:
We arrived at the client's house to assess the building and existing roof system so that we might come to a better understanding of the scope of the work to be completed. We came up with some notes, and sent them to the client for review:
1. In terms of scheduling, we are held up on a commercial site that may put us a number of days off May 2, 2011 will keep [the client] abreast. As soon as they are off the job they will be ready to begin this project - likely Wednesday or Thursday [May 2nd or 3rd].
2. The disposal bin: when the truck goes up onto the lawn and unloads/loads the bin, there could be some damage to the lawn and beds by the sidewalk. We will do what we can to alleviate, but it is of concern.
3. In terms of scope, here is what we are ordering and planning for;
House
  • Remove shingles.
  • Remove sheathing, insulation, and poly.
  • Insulators come in.
  • Re-sheet deck (we are supplying material).
  • Install EPDM system.
  • New skylights installed.
  • Edge flashing to be white.
  • Gutters and downs replaced to be white.
Garage
  • Remove shingles.
  • Reapply new green shingles.
4. We have spoken to three insulators that we normally use and will be deciding this weekend on whom we will be using; also have to speak to the fourth insulator that [the client] provided the contact information for (before making a decision). Inspection, May 11 2011: After selecting and contacting/contracting an insulator, we sent them on location to take measurements of the work area to understand how much material will need to be ordered. They were curious about the existing insulation, and whether they were to remove it or not. We put them in touch with the client to sort out the details on insulation removal. With respect to the spray foam insulation, however, the contractor advised us that they can only do the rooftop insulation in the event that weather permits and is not too windy. Roof Report, May 16 2011: Our crew loaded the metal and trim for two jobs, and drove into town to make the delivery. From 1:00-2:00pm they dropped the supplies for the first job, then made their way over to this job's site for 2:00pm and unloaded the tools and metal for the job. Roof Report, May 17 2011: The team, being yet unable to work on the roof, delivered the Ice & Water shield in addition to the tools required to work with the barrier. They left the site shortly after arrival to continue deliveries of materials to other job sites in the city. After picking up the necessary wood for this roof, they returned around 8:30pm and dropped it off; departing the site at 9:00pm. Roof Report, May 23 2011: One of the project leads met with the client to answer some questions about the job's progress. They discussed how the ridge vent is venting, and some of the desired changes to existing roof features. The client wants a guard installed on the gutter behind the house, and the eavestrough on the right side of the house raised to meet the new downpipe. The EPDM system was also discussed, and how the skylight installation would be performed. This meeting took just over an hour, and the project lead departed around 9:30 Roof Report, June 23 2011: We installed one of the two skylights, but the second was incorrectly sized and the order needs to be placed again. The client was very understanding, and we will get back to them as soon as the replacement comes in. Roof Report, July 12 2011: We received the replacement skylight last Thursday [July 7] but were unable to install it with inclement weather over the weekend. The plan is to install it the next nice day that comes about; we need at least one hour of dry weather to perform the installation. Roof Report, October 26 2011: The client notified us that there was some moisture coming in from the roof in an area where renovations were still in progress. Give that there was no rain this day, we were confused about where the moisture could be coming in. We sent over one of our crew members to attend to the concern and evaluate what repair options are necessary. Roof Report, October 27 2011: The client notified us again about a problem with the roof, this time the concern lay with the recently installed skylight. It would appear that some moisture was dripping down around the lower edge, so they requested that we look into it and make the necessary repairs before winter. Our teams were backed up with work, but we promised to send out a repair crew as soon as possible. Roof Report, November 10 2011: We arrived on-site for 1:30pm, and spoke briefly with the client before they had to leave for another meeting. The crew assessed the skylight and determined the materials needed for a proper repair. Furthermore, we cut open the bathroom fan flashing and the roof deck to access the connection at the master bedroom. As the flashings were about to be replaced with new ones, it began to rain. Temporary patches were put in place, and the client was advised not to use the fan for the evening and that we would return the following day.
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Exposing the roof deck to gain access to the master bedroom connection.
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We cut open the bathroom fan roof flashing to access the master bedroom. The insulators we were working with needed to know the amount of materials they would have to requisition and whether any or all of it required removal.
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The client had also reported leaks entering the building around the vicinity of this plumbing vent.
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Coupled with a failing sealant system, the base of the unit was also peeling apart.
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We removed the vent and decking to inspect for moist insulation and general water damage at the connections.
 
Roof Report, November 11 2011: Our repair crew spent the day on-site to address the leaking skylight. They began by removing the skylight itself and cleaned off the old membrane. Next, the curb was rebuilt to an 8-inch height, and the bottom was detailed with 2" x 2" for a solid sub-straight for drywalling. The entire skylight had to be dismantled for proper access to the membrane, so it was reassembled, caulked, tooled, and reinstallation. After the skylight was dealt with, we spoke to the client and let them know that we would return the following morning to give the same examinations and repairs to the bathroom fans and the soft spots at the each end of the ridge. Roof Report, November 14 2011: On this day, the GRS crew members arrived for 9am and spoke with the client to let them know of the scope of work for the day. We managed to repair both of the bathroom fan details, and half of the lower skylight (ran out of materials). All that remains (beyond the skylight) is the soft spot on the ridge, which should be repaired tomorrow with proper materials on-hand.
November 15 001
We began the skylight replacement by removing the flashing and exposing the roof around the fixture.
November 15 003
Next, the unit itself was removed.
November 15 004
A new frame was installed. The previous skylight had been installed directly into the roof.
November 15 005
Installing the skylight into place over the new frame,
November 15 008
Next, we sealed the frame into the roof using seam tape. and metal flashing.
November 15 009
Liquid rubber coatings were applied over the corners and the seams.
November 15 011
Our repair of the bathroom fan details entailed installing new vents and replacing the insulation in the master bedroom connection.
November 15 012
After replacing the exposed section with a new board, it was patched over with EPDM.
November 15 014
Finishing up the second vent installation. The seams were made watertight with spud.
< End Report > CODE: 5408 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Industrial Metal Roof Snow and Ice Removal Edmonton, January 2011

Below you will find a series of field reports and correspondence from the Edmonton roofing repair crew responding to a call for snow and ice removal.  Field Report, January 21 2011: In the morning, we broke ice and removed snow from the work-site. After taking a lunch break, there was more than enough left for us to complete the day with. There are only two of us on-site so this may take some time. Client Correspondence, January 22 2011: We appreciate the hard work your crew has been doing despite only have two available. It would be great if you guys could work on getting the parking lot taken care of on that side of the building first as a priority.  Leak Assessment, January 24 2011: We assessed leak issues and determined an ice dam at the gutters and the dam is pushing the gutter away from the roof's edge. It is unsafe to move ice and snow without the entire gutter or ice falling on pedestrians or vehicles below (an entrance way is right below the problem area).
ice hanging from builging over parking lot
Ice dam buildup along the gutters
ice over screw heads
Depth of snow
ice over screw heads
Piled up snow bank
ice thickness in middle of roof
It comes by the block
long view of gutters
Long view of gutters
I'm showing the seal around the skylight
Roof closeup
I'm showing the skylight
Skylight
Post-ice breakup
Post-ice breakup
  < End Report > Code: 146 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Metal Roof Ice Damming Removal and Weatherproofing in Edmonton Alberta, January 18 to 22 2011

Article: Ice Dam Removal Edmonton.

Below you will find a report from our Edmonton roofing repair crew responding to a call from a commercial client to remove ice damming and to weatherproof their metal roof eaves trough.  Quotation, January 18 2011:
0
Eaves with mesh to be cleaned
  • Remove ice damn from eaves trough area on metal roof
  • Apply EPDM Firestone Rubber to roof eave and around face to make area monolithic so no water/ice enters roof system in the future
Client's requirement was foreground corner to steel beams
Client's requirement was foreground corner to steel beams
Scope of Work, January 22 2011:
  • Remove ice dam from eaves trough area. The pricing does not include roof snow and ice removal, only trough. If removal of ice may damage the trough, stop work, notify the client, and we will have to discuss replacement options.
  • After eaves are clean, the Senior Foreman will apply EPDM Firestone Rubber to the roof eave and around the face to make the area monolithic.
Ice buildup in eaves
Ice buildup in eaves
Out of scope portion of site
Out of scope portion of site
  < End Report > Code: 12225 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Roof Retrofitting in Unity SK, August to October 2010

Below you will find a series of Roof Reports and photos from our roofing repair crew in Unity, Saskatchewan. The client asked us to perform some retrofitting and approved some assessments that were made on-site. Roof retrofitting and leak mitigation was provided.

Roof Report, August 24 2010:

We opened one ventilation unit which was found to have traces of moisture. It was water-tested, which came back positive as a leak area. We also found areas that had open wire penetrations and gas lines going into the building. A cut-test was also performed, where 4-ply styrofoam insulation (5") and a vapour barrier was found. This might explain why water had to travel some distance before it appeared as a leak, since the rest of the roof is in good shape. Areas requiring maintenance were sealed with mash, mastic and additional caulking as required. Client Callback, October 21 2010: After TPO recovery, the client found more water leaking at grade-level. We resolved the issue with caulking around the problem area. < End Report > Code: 120 Contact Us Call our 24 Hour Emergency Roof Repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. For all other areas of Canada call 1.877.497.3528 Toll Free. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Edmonton Flat BUR Roof Repair and Maintenance, September 2010

This Edmonton client required repairs to an existing built up roof system. Some areas on the roof appear to be blistering and others have ponding water. A crew was dispatched to perform the repairs once the weather was suitable. Note: This report contains several separate repairs and maintenance reports completed at different times.
Scope of Work: Repairs to Existing BUR – Built Up Roof System.
  • 7 areas of the roof have blistering that requires repair.
  • 3 areas of the roof have ponding that requires repair.
  • 2 units show water penetration to the interior.
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Some blistering in the roof around ventilation vents, with signs of moisture buildup.
002
Exposed blistering sticking through the gravel layer.
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Holes in the base of a plumbing vent. During periods of precipitation, water has a direct point of entry into the building through holes such as these.
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Significant signs of moisture buildup lead from evaporated standing water.
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We removed the gravel around sections of significant moisture buildup to expose the roof surface. We found small pockets of waterpooling, which was also entering the building through the various blisters and tears that were identified.
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Spudding over some tears.
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Parts of the underlay that bordered with the edge of the shingle roof section were curling up, and required refastening. Moisture was entering the building through here.
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Cement was applied over the sections of the roof where we had found significant standing water.
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For smaller holes and blistering, we applied spudding, mesh over top, and then followed up with a second layer of spud.
  Roof Report, January 28, 2011: Investigated roof leak, approximately 18" frozen snow on roof. Checked all repairs done previously and no deficiencies could be found. Possible leak area (small leak now, did not show for 6 months) could only be related to metal flashing/roof flashing interface, which right now is frozen together.
I told our site contact that as soon as we have a good break in the weather we would be back to source the leak. She also asked me to check how the drains were, which were exposed and working fine. The client then showed me interior cracks in her ceiling, which with the amount of snow on the roof are more than likely due to extra weight on roof.  She told me their condo board has no money to pay for snow removal and they would take care of it themselves.
Annual Maintenance Follow-up, April 25, 2012: Arriving on site we walked around the building to look for any signs of potential problems ie. open mortar joints and general degradation, and nothing stood out. As we entered the premises interior ceilings and walls did not show any signs of water damage/problems.  Once we proceeded to the roof there was nothing that stood out. Closer examination showed some caulking drying up and cracking. We proceeded to caulk all units/protrusion on the roof and also caulked all seams and screws on the parapet flashing. There were a few minor repairs needed near the scuppers. We used MS Detail to do these repairs. Otherwise the BUR portion of the roof showed no signs of any deficiencies, such as blistering or ridging etc. Once the body of the roof was inspected for these deficiencies we then proceeded to broom the entire roof.  We would level out gravel where the wind around some units would push the rocks away and create a bare spot which would be open to exposure/ UV rays. Then we leveled out the gravel on the entire roof looking for low spot and making sure they were covered. There are only two areas of concern.  The first is the shingles under the scuppers; they are badly worn and are in need of replacement. The second is the gyp rock cover the hatch door. It came off when we opened the hatch, we would have fixed it but it had been re-screwed back on so many times that the edges of the gyp rock were nothing but torn paper. There were several different types of nails and screws around the edge to further indicate it was repaired many times. Roof Report, June 20, 2012:
Removed 18 inches of gravel around vent. The plys are wet and soft so we applied 12" of plastic cement around.
IMAG0271
The ply around the vents were wet, soft, and coming apart.
IMAG0273
12" of plastic cement was applied around the base.
Annual Maintenance Follow-up, January 30, 2014:
An email sent from our project manager to the client:
Hi, Our report, that was copied to you, determined that there are a number of areas of concern that will cause leaks; 1. Areas such as the caulking on the heat stacks (you don't need to call anyone to replace heat stacks) - maintenance issue. 2. Ice damming glacier effect - again maintenance. The previous repairs are not the issue. You have a failed roof that is going to fail in a number of areas at any time, as with this report. When the roof fails the leaks will manifest on the inside at the lowest points, the same points as always because water finds the lowest point in that area and manifests. Did you want a work order to have repairs done? Thanks
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Some of the rooftop appliances, such as the base of this heat stack, required re-caulking around its seams.
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Some of the rooftop units also had some tears along the termination bar which required resealing.
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Exposed pocket adjacent to a piece of edge flashing. When ice damming melts, the water has a clear point of entry into the building through sections such as this.
20140128_151422
Ice buildup directly facing an exposed section of the roof edge. We advised the client that without certain parts of the assembly being replaced, water would eventually leak into the building once the snow and ice melted.
 
 This project may be updated at a later date.
< End Report > CODE: 10737 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.