Spray Foam Roof Repair Request, September 2015, Esterhazy SK

This client in Esterhazy, SK had some problems in 2014 after a big storm. The third-floor rental units of this building had some water damage then, but none since. They reached out to GRS to find a local roofing company that specializes in flat roofs. Our project management worked with them to begin scheduling a team to come out from Regina or Saskatoon. Request For Service: September 24, 2015 The client called in to GRS to see if any roofers could make their way out to the small town of Esterhazy, SK and inspect their roof to see what might've caused water damage in the rental units below a year prior (July 2014). There have been no reports of further water ingress since, but their insurance company required that the roof be attended to before they can proceed with the claim. With Esterhazy, SK being so far away from major centres of operation for GRS, scheduling was a little bit difficult, so the project manager sought as much up-front information as possible about the site and the state of the roof before dispatching crew to go on-site. Submitted Photos: September 25, 2015 The client sent in photos that show the state of the roof and what kind of system the GRS crew would be dealing with upon their arrival. In doing so, it ensures that everybody handling this project with GRS understands what would need to be done in order to correctly patch the roof without any excess travel time such a distance from Regina, where the repair team would be departing from.  
Image 1
The client submitted photos of the initial state of their roof.
Image 2
There were some tears running significant lengths of the roof which required patching.
Image 3
There had been a big storm in 2014, which contributed to water damage and ingress in some of the rental units underneath the roof.
Image 4
A spray foam company had originally installed the roof. Heavy weather conditions resulting in damage are often covered under warranty.
Image 8
There had been some residual water standing that had culminated around blistering that had also formed in the assembly.
Image 10
On top of the blistering, some air/gas bubbles had become trapped. If not addressed, these can eventually lead to tears and holes.
 
Image 15
Wide view of significant standing water over blistered sections of the roof.
Image 17
Tearing and blisters were also found along the perimeter of the roof.
Image 18
The foam joining the roof and the edge flashing was exposed up to the downspout. Water had not been draining correctly, which also culminated into leaks.
  Correspondence: September 25, 2015 The project manager receiving these photos noted the poorly state of the roof system and asked how long ago it was installed. The client responded that it had been installed in 2008 by a Spray Foam company. In dealing with these types of failures, it's important to consider if the system is under warranty or not. Most of the systems and materials that GRS installs on flat roofs come with 20-40 years of expected lifetime and warranty coverage. The project manager relayed this information to the client, as the repairs could be covered by the company that performed the original installation, or the material manufacturer. The client then located the paperwork from the 2008 installation and found that their roof bears a 10-year warranty against leaks. It was at that point that the GRS  project manager advised returning to the original roofing company and advising them of the problems with the structure. The client heeded the advice, and the service request was then closed. < End Report > CODE: 1000 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Roof Deck Drainage and Waterproofing

ARTICLE:  Roof Deck Drainage Problems. Waterproofing a 2 Ply SBS Modified Bitumen Roof Balcony in Edmonton, Alberta.

Recommendations for Waterproofing Outdoor Decks Over Conditioned Living Space. Roof Deck Drainage and Waterproofing - Inspection and Repair of a Torch-On Flat Roof on Outdoor Balcony at Multi-Family Condominium. Customers regularly call on us to have roof assessments (inspections) completed. During a roof assessment our journeyman roofers assess the roofs condition. We assess the roof for preventative maintenance reasons as well as inspecting existing problems that the customer is pointing out. We then discuss different scopes of work fix the problems as well as potential materials and costs related to the repairs. One of the most common calls we get for inspections and repairs are rooftop decks, balconies and patios. The primary reason the failure rate on rooftop decks is so high is because of the original installation. It is common for incorrect membrane choice to be the reason. In other words, many people install an outdoor deck membrane that is intended only for an outdoor deck and not a membrane for over a heated living space. If your rooftop deck or balcony is over a heated living area you require a special membrane that is also intended for low slope roofing (as well as deck waterproofing) and is approved for use over a conditioned living space. Common products for this are Dura-Deck or DecTec, both of which are a PVC membrane that are suitable to be walked on (so they do not require a floating deck over top) and they manufacture membranes suitable for over a conditioned living space. We use DecTec extensively and have had great results with it. Or, also common is the installation of a membrane that won't hold up to the foot traffic associated with outdoor living areas. Other reasons include simple age, wear and tear, drainage and issues relating to penetrations or floating deck assemblies on top of the membrane. Visit our main website for more information on rooftop deck waterproofing. This particular inspection and subsequent repairs was more focused toward an aging membrane and the associated repairs that come with not properly maintaining the deck membrane and building envelope over the years. The drainage problems were causing significant damage to the exterior of the building. Below you will find the inspection report. May 20, 2015: Journeyman Superintendent Attends for Balcony Inspection. Roof Inspection Location: 10245 116 Street NW Edmonton Alberta. Roof Inspection Date: May 20, 2015. Roof Type: SBS 2 Ply Modified Bitumen Torch-On Membrane on Roof Balcony. Site Location Type: Multi-Family Condominium.

This customer is experiencing a problem with water getting in the roof system and it draining out on a low corner and destroying some exterior brick work. In the area of the leak there are 2 laps of the SBS modified bitumen that have come apart.

Roof Deck Drainage damaging exterior of building. Edmonton, Alberta.
Roof Deck Drainage damaging exterior of building.
SBS Torch ON Seam Pealing back
SBS Torch-On lap pealing back.
SBS Torch on roof, seconf lap starting to come apart
SBS Torch on roof, second lap starting to come apart.
 

Scope: To repair this, degranulate the area and apply new torch-on stripping in and around the corner to seal in properly. Man hours: To complete 3 - 6. Material needed: 1 roll of SBS modified cap membrane.

The customer  would also like a quote for the following scope: to fill 13 pitch pockets on the roof and also seal the voids around pitch pockets with some detail sealer.

Area that needs sealing
Area that needs sealing at gutter to wall area.
Pitch Pockets that need filling
Pitch pockets at deck railing post termination area that need filling.
More seams on the sbs torch on roof that need to be sealed
More seams on the SBS torch-on roof that need to be sealed.

Man hours to complete = 10. Material needed: 4 gallons of portable sealer. 1 box of IKO MS Detail.

More Reading:
http://www.jlconline.com/decks/waterproofing-a-rooftop-deck.aspx
https://www.grscanadainc.com/Rooftop_Deck_Waterproofing.html
https://www.grscanadainc.com/DecTec_Deck_Waterproofing.html
http://www.dec-tec.com/
https://www.pinterest.com/generalroofing/dectec-deck-and-rooftop-waterproofing/
File to be updated when repair reports come in to office.
< End of report >
CONTACT US
Call our 24 Hour Emergency Roof Repair at 1.780.424.7663 Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5.
For all other areas of Canada call 1.877.497.3528 Toll Free.
We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.
 

Roof Canopy Reconstruction Edmonton June 3 2015

Roof Canopy Reconstruction Edmonton, Alberta. Flat Roof. Tar and Gravel. Multi-Family.

Below is a continuation report from our Tar and Gravel Roof Repair blog entry on May 31, 2015. The continuation below describes the reconstruction of the front entry door roof canopy of the condo that the crew was working on. April 30, 2015: Roofing crew attends to location for reconstruction of the entry canopy. Location: 10315 113 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta. Type of Property: Multi Family.
We arrived at 7:30 am and filled out safety documentation and conducted our tool box safety site meeting. We had 2 different scopes of work to do to finish work on this building. The first scope consists of re-installing the metal flashing on perimeter the perimeter of the tar and gravel flat roof. The scope of work consists of overlapping the existing metal flashing that was on the building and fastening the end of each piece of flashing. The second scope was the reconstruction of the entry door roof canopy and installation of the waterproofing flat roof membrane material. The old tar and gravel membrane had been removed prior. Today we started by ripping off the old rotten plywood and 2" x 6" 's. We then framed in some new 2"x 6" 's to replace the old rotten joists pieces. We then used 2" x 4" 's to make a lever and push up on the front left corner to bring it up level with the rest of canopy. Raised it up roughly 3 inches. When the other guys finished up installing metal on the flat roof they started helping us with the remaining work on the front entry. At this point the canopy was up to level and had new trusses installed. We installed new 1/2" plywood sheathing on top of the trusses and screwed it all down for a secure substrate. We then fabricated a new cant flashing and installed all new cant around the left hand side and left front of the canopy. The next step was to install the FR board (which is a roof board with the base sheet SBS modified attached to it at the factory) on top of the plywood and screwed it down. We then had to stop due to rain and the site was set-off for completion. The crew will finish off the installation of the 2 ply SBS modified torch-on roof membrane tomorrow (including base striping, SBS cap sheet install and putting the metal flashing back on). There are roughly 5 hours of work left to complete. MATERIALS USED. 2 - 4' x 8' sheets of plywood. 3 - 2" × 6" 8 ' pieces. Wood screws. 2 - sheets of FR board (SBS modified base membrane with roof board attached). 4 - 2"×4" 8' pieces for the cant flashing.
Roof Canopy Reconstruction Edmonton June 3 2015
Roof Canopy Reconstruction Edmonton June 3 2015
New trusses installed for canopy flat roof.
New trusses installed for canopy flat roof.
New sheathing installed for canopy flat roof.
New sheathing installed for canopy flat roof.
Mechanically fastening FR base board (SBS)
Mechanically fastening FR base board (SBS)
First layer of 2 ply SBS modified installed.
First layer of 2 ply SBS modified installed.
Rotten roof sheathing (substrate)
Rotten roof sheathing (substrate)
Rotten roof joist due to moisture ingress.
Rotten roof joist due to moisture ingress.
  Other Photos: To be continued... < End of report > Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Tar and Gravel Roof Repair Edmonton May 31 2015

ARTICLE: Tar and Gravel Roof Repair Edmonton, Alberta. Flat Roof. Multi-Family Condo. Repairs to Scuppers, Edge Flashing Leaks and Entrance Canopy.

Many of our customers are of course regular repeat customers that have over time come to trust the expertise of our journeymen roofers. This particular customer is no different. The manager for this property owner originally called us three or so years ago and since then we have likely worked on most or near all of their properties in the Edmonton area.
The reports below are for the original inspection of the roof and the repair work that the crews did on the condominium property. A front entry canopy required re-construction, there were scupper repairs, and some leaks around perimeter flashing on the built-up tar and gravel roof.
April 19, 2015: Customer Contacts Project Manager at GRS for Tar and Gravel Roof Repair Assessment and Pricing.
Our customer called today for Edmonton roof repair service to one of their condo holdings in the Edmonton area. I have dispatched a journeyman to inspect the roof in accordance to our customer's requests.
April 20, 2015: Journeyman Roofer Attends to Roof for Inspection.
Site Address: 10315 113 Street Edmonton, Alberta. Type of Work Site: Multi Family Condominium.
Roof Type: BUR (tar and gravel).
Our customer would like a quotation to seal in 5 scuppers using a gum patch method and not torch-on with open-flame. He would also like us to remove all the perimeter metal and fix any spots that are splitting along the membrane with gum patches. When we put the metal back on he would like us to put silicone on the laps of the metal. There may also be entry roof canopy reconstruction involved.
Man hours to complete: Approximately 50 hours.
Material needed: 5 - 3 gallon cans of gum. 1 roll of 6 inch mesh. 4 tubes of silicone.
List of front entry canopy materials to be determined.
Tar and Gravel Roof Repair Edmonton - Splitting in bitumen along flashing.
Tar and Gravel Roof Repair Edmonton - Splitting in bitumen along flashing.
Roof scupper with heat wire for ice melting.
Roof scupper with heat wire for ice melting.
Roof edge flashing that needs to come off.
Roof edge flashing that needs to come off.
April 29, 2015: Roof Repair Crew Attends for First Day.
The following site is a condo building in Edmonton Alberta. We were sent here to complete three scopes of work. 1) Flat roof spot repairs around perimeter (remove flashing, repair, return flashing to roof). 2) Fix cracks on edge of scuppers to avoid future leaking scuppers. 3) Fix a canopy roof that was sagging on the front left side.
Scope # 1: Perimeter spot repairs on main tar and gravel flat roof.
We started the day with the toolbox meeting. Got set up on roof. The roofers started stripping metal flashing around the perimeter while I went and got supplies. We did two different scopes of work on the roof.
1st scope was patching around the perimeter of the cant flashing which consists of spraying down asphalt primer on area where patch is needed. Then putting one layer of mastic on top of the asphalt primer. We then put the green mesh on the layer of mastic. The next step in the process is to add one more layer of mastic on top of the green mesh and let it dry. Final is to re-install the roof flashing.
Spot Repair on corner of roof
Spot Repair on corner of roof.
The second scope of work we completed was to fix the scuppers as they had cracks around the edge of them and they were leaking. To do this we screwed each side of the scupper tight against the cant metal. We then put on one layer of mastic on the cracks. We then added the green mesh to the first layer of mastic. Followed by one more layer of mastic on top of the green mesh. This is an alternate method to using open-flame torching.
Before repair pic
Before scupper repair picture.
During Repair Pic
During scupper repair picture.
finished pic
Scupper finished picture.
  Other photos:
WORK LEFT TO DO:
-  fix canopy  (10 hours of work)
MATERIALS  USED:
-green mesh 10 feet
-Half a  pale of mastic
MATERIALS NEEDED AS FOLLOWS: - 4, 2×6×12 -2, 4'×8' sheets of 1/2" plywood - 20' of can't -13' of riglet flashing -3 sheets of FR board -1 roll of cap -20' of cant flashing -1 scupper -1 10' 2"×4" -Screws and nails 1 box each -20' of 2 x 8
Canopy re-construction part of the scope for this location to be included as a separate blog article report.
< End of Report >
CONTACT US
Call our 24 Hour Emergency Roof Repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5.
For all other areas of Canada call 1.877.497.3528 Toll Free.
We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Edmonton Commercial Roof Repair Quotation, September 2014

This client reached out to GRS to receive a quotation for repairs to their commercial residential building. They included a report (from which the subsequent photos and their captions are obtained), which allowed us to return a quotation for the repairs they sought. Client's Report Received: September 17, 2014 The client sent their report into the GRS office, detailing problems with the current roof and explaining what kind of services they would like performed in the various problem spots. This allowed our account representative to deliver and present an accurate quote for the repairs, in addition to positioning the possibility of a roof replacement as had been discussed with the client in prior communications. GRS Note: The photos and comments below were included in an Inspection Report carried out by a third-party and, while informative, may not fully represent the opinions of GRS. Sometimes clients will submit their own photos or reports that they've independently sourced; all of this information helps us build a proper quote without needing to physically arrive on site. Roof Slope: Flat Membrane Type: Built-Up-Roof (BUR)
Overview of the existing roof. Roof membrane is in fair to poor condition.
Overview of the existing roof. Roof membrane is in fair to poor condition.
Overview of the existing roof. Roof membrane is in fair to poor condition.
Overview of the existing roof. Roof membrane is in fair to poor condition.
View of exposed membrane experiencing increased deterioration. Area should be scraped clean, reinforced, and new protective surfacing applied. This deficiency was observed at multiple locations.
View of exposed membrane experiencing increased deterioration. Area should be scraped clean, reinforced, and new protective surfacing applied. This deficiency was observed at multiple locations.
At two corner (both Northeast facing corners) locations the protective surfacing has deteriorated, exposing the roof membrane. These locations should be swept clean and new protective surfacing applied.
At two corner (both Northeast facing corners) locations the protective surfacing has deteriorated, exposing the roof membrane. These locations should be swept clean and new protective surfacing applied.
Multiple membrane blister locations noted throughout the roof. All blisters should be cut out and new membrane complete with protective surfacing installed.
Multiple membrane blister locations noted throughout the roof. All blisters should be cut out and new membrane complete with protective surfacing installed.
Protective surfacing has failed at various curb locations leaving the roof membrane exposed. Locations should be swept clean and new protective surfacing applied.
Protective surfacing has failed at various curb locations leaving the roof membrane exposed. Locations should be swept clean and new protective surfacing applied.
Drain location should be swept clean to allow for the application of new protective surfacing. In addition, a debris screen should be installed to prevent drain blockages from occurring.
Drain location should be swept clean to allow for the application of new protective surfacing. In addition, a debris screen should be installed to prevent drain blockages from occurring.
Membrane protection should be installed beneath all rooftop equipment to prevent membrane damages from occurring.
Membrane protection should be installed beneath all rooftop equipment to prevent membrane damages from occurring.
At multiple curb locations, screws have been installed through the metal flashings and into the membrane creating a hole. It is possible that moisture entry will occur at these locations. Repairs should be carried out on the underlying membrane.
At multiple curb locations, screws have been installed through the metal flashings and into the membrane creating a hole. It is possible that moisture entry will occur at these locations. Repairs should be carried out on the underlying membrane.
Image 10
At multiple locations along the parapet walls, screws have been installed through the metal flashings and into the membrane creating a hole. It is possible that moisture entry will occur at these locations. Repairs should be carried out on the underlying membrane.
Newly installed metal flashings have been poorly secured into place. Fasteners have broken through the metal flashings at isolated locations. New metal flashings have been installed directly over the original metal flashings.
Newly installed metal flashings have been poorly secured into place. Fasteners have broken through the metal flashings at isolated locations.
New metal flashings have been installed directly over the original metal flashings.
View of wind damage to metal flashings. Additional securement of the metal flashings is recommended.
View of wind damage to metal flashings. Additional securement of the metal flashings is recommended.
The newly installed metal flashings have blown off at this location exposing the original metal flashings.
The newly installed metal flashings have blown off at this location exposing the original metal flashings.
Image 14
Debris buildup around the drain screen should be removed to allow for optimal drainage.
Image 15
Sealant installed onto storm collar has deteriorated and is no longer functioning as intended. Existing sealant should be removed and new sealant applied.
Conclusion:
This report is based on visual observations of the roof system. No destructive testing was conducted to analyze the underlying components of the roof system. With proper maintenance the remaining service life of the roof system is approximately Three (3) to Six (6) years. Maintenance should include installing protective surfacing, repairing membrane deficiencies, repairing membrane blisters, securing metal flashings, installing drain screen, installing membrane protection, removing debris from the drain screen and applying sealant to the storm collar. < End of Third-Party Inspection Report >
Quotation Delivered: After reviewing the thorough report submitted by the client, our account representative calculated a quote for repairs, as well as roof recovery and replacement options. They were returned to the client for their consideration, and we awaited their response. < End Report > CODE: 10040 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Commercial Roofing Maintenance in Edmonton AB, January 2011 and May 2014

Below you will find field reports and project management notes from our Edmonton roofing repair crew responding to maintenance calls for an ongoing commercial real estate client.  Maintenance Call, January 20 2011:
Further to the situation at our other property, we have received confirmation that the owner has completed all he can do for snow removal at this site. As per our conversation, we would like a site assessment and quotation. This information will then be forwarded to the owner for a final decision.
Post-Repair Report, January 17 2011: There was water in the roof drain, but we noticed the down-pipe was frozen solid. Water was forced out of the pipe near the top of the wall and caused lots of ice to form against it. Ice melt was spread out around the pipe and drain. The drain pipe should be removed and thawed, or otherwise replaced completely. A tenant on the ground floor unit told us there might be as many as four units in this block (northeast corner) that have roof leaks. We should schedule a meeting with the building superintendent so he can let us in to see where they are. January 18 2011: We were shown three other units that reported leaks. Only one on the southwest corner was an actual leak caused by a frozen drain pipe. The leak on the northeast corner that we worked on yesterday has stopped. The owner also inquired about pricing for snow removal. January 19 2011: The owner has advised us that he will be cleaning the snow off the roof himself. Post-inspection indicates that there are many potential issues that will come about during the spring thaw. The roof will like experience failures during this time. The drain pipe should also be replaced. The client called us back a couple of years later inquiring about a roof replacement. We have attached notes from the project manager as well, detailing his recommendations, pros, and cons of each system. Quotation, May 15 2014:
  • Complete roof replacement options:
    • Spray foam only (+ top coating - polyurea, liquid rubber, or EPDM)
    • EPDM
    • TPO or PVC
    • 2-ply SBS modified bitumen (torch-on)
    • 4-ply engineered liquid rubber roof
    • TOUGH ROOF
  • Sustainable Roofing - Roof Recovery
    • Spray foam only (+ top coating - polyurea, liquid rubber, or EPDM)
    • EPDM
    • TPO or PVC
    • 2-ply SBS modified bitumen (torch-on)
    • 1-ply coat tar
    • 2-ply engineered liquid rubber
Project Manager Recommendations This roof appears to be a candidate for any of the systems above. Although we can perform repairs or a complete re-conditioning (maintenance), we cannot guarantee any probability of material performance or success (beyond our Lifetime Workmanship Guarantee, automatically included with any work we do). I will preface my personal recommendations with a list of important things to remember when reviewing roof system choices:
  1. All low slope roof membranes on the market are "good products" - performance depends on who installs the system, the quality of roof assembly components, and geographical area.
  2. All roof membranes have similar life-cycle expectancy and associated costs.
  3. All roof membranes will provide excellent protection over many years if maintained properly.
  4. GRS installs all different system types. Not every roofing contractor can or does install them, so personal bias can play a role in recommendations.
  5. All low slope roof systems have pros and cons.
Two of my personal recommendations for colder Canadian climates are the 2-ply SBS torch-on and the single-ply EPDM. We are discovering that EPDM achieves one of our highest probabilities of success. It has consistent performance, price point, and ease of maintenance (provided it is fully adhered and not ballasted). SBS is also widely used and has performed consistently in Western Canada. In addition to the roof membrane, if you require added R value I would consider adding roof insulation boards or a spray-foam with a liquid rubber. Polyurea or EPDM as a covering. As noted above, one of our recommendations is the single ply roofs. Of the single plys, I recommend EPDM over TPO and PVC as TPO and PVC are heat welded and technician error can play into the integrity of seaming. GRS has many hundreds of thousands of square feet on hundreds of buildings with fully adhered EPDM performing exceptionally well across Western Canada. FYI: ballasted EPDM can be a nuisance to maintain as the rock ballast becomes a significant landscaping endeavour, so we choose to fully-adhere EPDM when possible. And finally are the Tough Roof, 4-ply tar and gravel, and the 4-ply liquid rubber options. Tar and gravel (and torch-n) have been used successfully in Western Canada for a number of decades now. They do, however, use an open flame or kettle and the SBS modified torch-on also has seams that can be problematic if the torch applicator is not highly skilled. The Tough Roof system is a great system that in some instances could be considered over-kill and the 4-ply liquid rubber system can be problematic if installing outside of perfect summer conditions. A note specifically to the spray foam SPF roofing - we have experienced a number of roof failures in colder climates due to the top coat cracking and peeling when not applied properly and to the recommended thickness. Many roofing companies are pricing SPF roofing in such a way that it is difficult for them to be profitable applying the top-coat at a proper thickness. If not applied correctly, the spray foam elastomeric or polyurea coatings are prone to cracking and peeling. Water then penetrates the foam and gets in-between the existing roof system and foam, then runs, and then we have to replace the roof as there is no way to get the water out between the systems. A properly applied polyurea spray coat, liquid rubber spray coat, or EPDM membrane solves that problem. With spray foam (specifically in Canada) we prefer to cover it with EPDM primarily, and if not with EPDM then liquid rubber. We prefer to not use the standard polyurea or reflective elastomerics. Additional notes for consideration:
  1. Skylights are not included in pricing unless otherwise noted.
  2. If structure is experiencing condensation prior to renovation or does in future - a repair, recovery, replacement, or any work done by GRS under this contract is not guaranteed to alleviate condensation issues.
  3. GRS is not responsible for the structure currently or in future experiencing any deflecting, warping, or settling. GRS is not responsible to assess or advise toward engineering issues. If you have any concern about the engineering of the building, please check with an engineer in advance of any roofing work commencing.
  4. Due to the nature of low slope roofing and although all care and attention is expected by the crews at work, GRS is not responsible for water ingress that may result during construction or retro-fitting of a low-slope or “flat roof” system.
< End Report > Code: 153 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Edmonton Roof Parapet Flashing Installation, September 2012

This client requested a quotation for replacement cap flashing at their residential building in Edmonton. We provided the quote in late September and carried out the work in short order. They returned to us in November for further work, which we were happy to assist with. Inquiry Received: September 25 2012: We first heard from this client when they requested cap flashing done on their building. The day after we delivered a quote, we sent out one of our crew members to take exact measurements and order the metal flashing. We carried out the first part of the flashing installation, but with the building’s roof incomplete at the time, we could not do 100% of the initial scope. Field Report, November 6 2012: The GRS team returned to the site to finish the cap flashing that was originally requested, now that the roof is finished and ready for the installation. We installed 170ft of flashing as per request, and completed the job in a single day. IMG_6216 IMG_9271 photo (14) photo (15) photo (16) photo (17) photo (18) photo (19) photo (20) photo (21) photo (22) photo (23) photo (24) photo (25) < End Report > CODE: 1350. Article topics: Edmonton Roof Flashing, Parapet Metal Cap Flashing, Multi-Family Condominium, New Construction.   Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Edmonton Commercial Flat Roof Replacement, August 2012

This client in Edmonton required a complete flat roof replacement on a multi-family apartment building. An initial inspection was carried out by our crew followed by a complete roof replacement to prevent further water damage. Note: This report also contains additional follow-up service reports.
Inspection, August 30, 2012:
I have measured the apartment building, and have attached photos of the measurements, along with the possible problems regarding the leaks. There are a number of bubbles scattered over the roof, with the biggest bubble being roughly 12 feet long. It is a flat roof (tar and gravel), and by my estimation the current tar and gravel roof is roughly 20-23 years old. As the gum box is in pretty rough shape, I tried to picture as many of the bubbles as I could. However I lost track of them as there are roughly 8 bubbles over a 20' by 20' area. The corners of the building look okay, as do the surface of the pipes. I did not want to disturb the tar and gravel too much as I did not want to cause another leak. I am surprised there is only one leak. With the bubbles being scattered over the roof it would be hard to tell which bubble is causing it, and in time there will be more leaks.
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Roof Report, September 13, 2012:
Removed gravel from roof and window areas, repaired hole in roof and waterproofed. This roof requires a full replacement. Edmonton-20120913-00146 Edmonton-20120913-00148 Edmonton-20120913-00151
Roof Report, September 26, 2012:
  • Arrived at site, set up ladder (with bungee tie off).
  • Two crew members removed the old roof while I went to Roofmart for material pickup.
  • 720 sq ft. had been ripped by the time I had returned.
  • Gaping holes are evident in the sheathing. Will be replaced tomorrow.
  • We started to sweep the area, removing gravel in preparation for ice and water application.
  • Adhesive was applied to the substrate, and ice and water was laid down.
  • The ice and water was tied into the existing roof system with tar.
  • Vents were surrounded with tar.
  • Roof was cleaned up and ladder was taken down.
Materials Used:
  • 4 rolls of ice and water.
  • 1 pail of adhesive.
  • 1 roller.
  • Several sleeves.
IMG-20120925-00278-Optimized IMG-20120925-00279-Optimized IMG-20120925-00280-Optimized IMG-20120925-00281-Optimized IMG-20120925-00282-Optimized IMG-20120925-00283-Optimized IMG-20120925-00284-Optimized IMG-20120925-00287-Optimized IMG-20120925-00289-Optimized IMG-20120925-00291-Optimized IMG-20120925-00293-Optimized IMG-20120925-00294-Optimized IMG-20120925-00295-Optimized IMG-20120925-00296-Optimized IMG-20120925-00297-Optimized IMG-20120925-00298-Optimized IMG-20120925-00300-Optimized IMG-20120925-00301-Optimized IMG-20120925-00302-Optimized Roof Report, September 28, 2012:
  • Arrived on site and filled out safety documents.
  • The crew continued laying down fiber board on roof.
  • A tarp was attached to the side of building to prevent garbage from damaging walls while dumping.
  • Parapet was coated all the way around.
  • Fabric was laid and coated with liquid rubber with a paint roller.
  • Clean up began once whole area was rolled with liquid rubber.
  • Packed up equipment onto the trailer and finished for the day.
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Roof Report, October 15, 2012:
  • Dried off frost on the roof.
  • Rolled roof field with high bond 200.
work done for oct 15 2012 001 work done for oct 15 2012 002
Follow-up Snow Removal Service, March 31, 2013: This was a snow and water removal service call. There was only a small spot of snow and the rest was water. Water covers almost all the roof except where there was a drain or scupper. The average water level was 2' and was removed by pushing the water in tandem with snow shovels. Edmonton-20130207-00396
Follow-up Inquiry, June 4, 2013: Our project manager sent the following email to the client regarding a possible water leak issue (her response follows):
Hi,
I've had some time to sort through your inquiry earlier. I had a tech attend and the roof is extremely sound. It is possible, depending on timing over the weekend, that somehow when the crew attended to do the roof that somehow water got in somewhere. But the roof as it stands now is extremely and unusually sound. And as far as what you previously viewed with those flashings (the comment that the roof may not be done from your previous).... I have no idea how those came off the roof and I don't even want to venture a guess but my roofers re-fastened and all is good. Notwithstanding, here are some points of clarification or future discussion: IF THE ROOF EVER LEAKS AGAIN (or it appears to be the roof at all for any reason) have whomever it is call me the second they see an issue. This is critical so I can assess. I have a suspicion that a roof drain is leaking somewhere in the plumbing and in ideal conditions it will leak. A theory of mine is that when the crew attended and they they pumped water off the roof (and directed it down a drain), this is when the leak occurred - which means there is a breach in the plumbing at a drain (if I am correct). Also, the roofers did mention that at some point you should consider either scuppers at the edge of the roof on each side with a downspout or alternatively more internal drains. They commented that when they attended to re-cover the whole roof that there was a fairly good amount of ponding which isn't good. Internal roof drains are very expensive due to the plumbing costs but external scuppers at 2 or 3 sides would be much less (like 10% of internal drains). The cause of this is that over the years a building settles and isn't level so either more plumbing drains are added or exterior scuppers. I think that about covers it for now. Be sure if there is any sign of a leak that at first sign they call me and we'll get over there at first sign to track the problem down and if we diagnose it's an internal plumbing connection to a drain we can coordinate the plumber for you at that time also. Thanks
Hi, Thanks for the information.  We did have our plumber attend the building yesterday and he did discover an issue with the plumbing in the lower unit, which has since been corrected.  We will keep an eye on it. Thanks so much for your quick response and I hope that we will no longer have any water problems. Regards,

Follow-up Service Dispatch, May 21, 2014:
We fixed a lot of seams that were split and also found some holes that are now repaired. One section was really bad and was ponding so I dried it out and applied new LR to the entire area. One vent was peeling around the base (I also fixed it). I then went through the whole roof with a fine tooth comb and fixed every deficiency with the LR.
Materials Used:
  • .5 pail of trowel grade LR.
  • 1 pail of roll on LR.
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< End Report > CODE: 12402 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Apartment Roof Drip Edge in Edmonton

Water Drip and Drainage Support The client reached out to us regarding a four-storey apartment building. They were having trouble with water backtracking behind the gutter and leaking on the ground to cause ice build-up. The first proposed fix was to install a drip edge under the shingle edge and down into the gutter. Furthermore, the joints of the gutters were leaking as well, and the liquid rubber process was explained to the client, who liked the idea of sealing the joints in with seam tape and the rubber solution. There was another section of shingles over the entryway (10 ft x 6 ft) that needed to be replaced. While everything else was being handled, it was requested that an extension be placed into one of the drain spouts. Material:
  • 280 feet of 4x3 inch drip edge (custom bent).
  • Roofing nails.
  • 1 down-pipe extension.
  • 1 to 2 pails of brush grade liquid rubber.
  • 3 – 4 rolls of 4 inch seam tape.
  • 2 bundle of shingles over entrance.
The repairs were carried out without incident, and this work-site has been completed. Below are the photos from our initial assessment:
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Ice buildup was being caused by water backing up behind the gutter and leaking to the ground.
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The first fix we proposed was to install a drip edge under the shingle edge and into the gutters.
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The gutter joints had also been leaking. We proposed liquid rubber coatings and seam tape as a solution to sealing the joints in.
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The downspout (left) also required an extension to the ground-level.
 
CODE: 12931
Until next time,         The Roofers at GRS
  Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Shingles Replacement and Plumbing/Ventilation Maintenance in Edmonton AB, July to August 2011

Below you will find a series of quotations and field reports from our Edmonton roofing repair crew. Our existing client approved our consultation for a full shingle replacement, system maintenance, and waterproofing. Quotation Request Received, July 28 2011: The client asked me to assess all five buildings in the condominium complex and give my recommendations for  each one. There are three 6-unit buildings and two 4-unit buildings. There is also a garage in the rear of the properties. I have attached the dimensions for each building.
Condo unit dimensions, plus garage
Dimensions for the condominium units and garage.
Note as well that there are 4' x 5' flat galvanized metal roofs above each entrance, but they do not require any attention at this time. Repair Assessment FIRST SET The units are past due for a re-roofing. The shingles on the bottom have not been functional for quite some time which has resulted in the roof deck rotting in some areas. The extent of the damage caused by the rot will not be known until we strip the shingles off. The flashing has also become loose, lifting up high enough away from the roofing that rain could easily blow in and damage the interior. I recommend a roof replacement as soon as possible.
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Condo side-view
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Condo front-view
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Weathered shingles
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Shingle assessment
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Flat portion assessment
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Cracked shingling
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Weathered shingles
  Materials required for low-slope application:
  • 41 shingles
  • 125 ft. cap
  • 314 ft. starter/drip
  • 18x 44 in. Ice & Water
  • 6x whirlybirds
  • 12x air vents
  • 6x 4 in. plumbing boots
  • 6x 6" x 4" plumbing pipe
SECOND SET This next unit is also due for a re-roofing, although it is not as urgent as the first. There is no evidence of rotting roof deck, but we will not know for sure until the roof is stripped. The flashing is also becoming loose, but not as bad as the first. I recommend it [the roof] be replaced this season. Materials required for low-slope application:
  • 28 shingles
  • 85 ft. cap
  • 234 ft. starter/drip
  • 13x 44 in. Ice & Water
  • 6x whirlybirds
  • 8x air vents
  • 4x 4 in. plumbing boots
  • 4x 6" x 4" plumbing pipe
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Past due on maintenance
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Cracking shingles
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More shingles requiring replacement
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Rear-view of another condo unit
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Condo side-view
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Front view
  THIRD SET This is a newer roof but it needs some attention. There are many shingles that need to be replaced to bring it back to a reasonable condition. There is also one chimney cap missing on this building. Materials:
  • 5x bundles BP 2-tone grey
  • 6x tubes Karnak
  • 1x 6 in. chimney cap
100_1265
Rear-view of condos
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Condo backyard
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Evident wear-and-tear
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Wear-and-tear by the gutters
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Odd shingle out
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Damage attributed to rotting wood
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Cracked roofing
  FOURTH SET Unit in relatively good shape with only a few shingles requiring replacement. Materials:
  • 1x bundle BP 2-tone grey
  • 2x tubes Karnak
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Torn shingles
100_1292
Needs replacing!
100_1293
Base view
  FIFTH SET The last building I assessed has had its roof replaced at some point but it is already showing signs of deterioration beyond repair. There is too much damage (especially on the bottom portion) to begin repairing it efficiently. One of the whirlybirds has lots several of its mounting screws and now the top portion of it is broken. I recommend that the entire roof be replaced in the near future. Materials required for low-slope application:
  • 41 shingles
  • 125 ft. cap
  • 314 ft. starter/drip
  • 18x 44 in. Ice & Water
  • 6x whirlybirds
  • 12x air vents
  • 6x 4 in. plumbing boots
  • 6x 6" x 4" plumbing pipe
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Damaged whirlybird
100_1247
In need of immediate maintenance
100_1248
Impeding water run-off
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Edge view
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Possible candidates for wood rot
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Torn shingles
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More torn shingles
Client Provided with Quotation, August 3 2011:
  • Remove shingles; dispose and apply new roofing
  • Types: architectural shingles, premium SBS modified shingles, premium slate/shake, metal/rubber/concrete
  • Venting correction
  • High profile shingle cap
  • Premium 44" Ice & Water protection: includes valleys, neck tie roof openings
  • Coloured flashings: drip edge, gable edge, valley, vents, walls
  • Complete roof underlayment wrap
  • Storm nailing and installation
  • Premium caulking: under vents, exposed nails, valleys, etc.
  • Replacement of rotted roof sheathing
Client approves the work on August 9 2011, crew begins on August 10 2011: The crew went around the roof and picked out all of the damaged shingles. There were a couple of pin-holed shingles as well. It was found that Ice & Water was used under the roof as underlayment. Everything that the crew removed was replaced. The same procedure was followed for the second complex. The shingles up for removal were sealed together very well, so when we applied more force, entire segments ripped off.
100_1423
Removing shingles in large segments
100_1242
Torn flashing and vent systems requiring maintenance
100_1243
Newer roofing system already experiencing weather damage
100_1244
Recommended a full replacement
100_1245
Top flat roof view
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More shingle removal
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Shingle removal from edges
  When the crew had finished ripping off the shingling on the west side of the sixth unit, we had to waterproof it. It was found that the roof was plank-based, rather than using sheeting. Rotten wood was also found that required replacement (an 8 ft. section). The remaining planks had their nails removed. Once preparation was complete, Ice & Water was applied to the base for waterproofing. The pallets for the east side were delivered later in the afternoon. Weather permitting, we will complete this site tomorrow.  
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Shingles fully removed
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This is what a bare roof looks like
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Cut-out for whirlybird
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Insulated roof
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Plumbing boot reinstalled
August 12, 2011: With respect to unit 6, we started ripping up shingles while concurrently working on plumbing stack penetrations. The penetrations were tarred and neck tied. Concurrently, re-shingled portions of the roof were waterproofed. There was no more rotten wood found. Our compressor stopped working near the end of cap placement. Hand nailing was our only option. Other than that, the day went as planned.
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Weatherproofing ventilation base
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Covering up punctures from the old shingle system
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Plumbing boot installation
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Weatherproofing the ventilation systems
100_1462   August 16, 2011: Remaining shingles on the east side were removed and no more rotten wood has been found on the units. Waterproofing continued and we began waste removal; the garbage bin had arrived in the morning. The crew is ready to begin roofing in the morning. August 17, 2011: West side shingles were removed today, but we got rained out while trying to take off the flashing from the sidings. Installation of replacement shingles began.
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Installing new shingles
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Old shingles undergoing removal
100_1466 August 18, 2011 One of the plumbing stacks came too far out from the roof for the plumbing boot to fit. A crewman was sent back to the shop to get two high dome boots, so we kept putting the PVC pipes in. Two whirlybirds were also cut in and installed. We will complete this site tomorrow around the afternoon.
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Plumbing boot installation
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We had to re-size some segments
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Preparing to install ventilation system
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Installed
  Site Completition, August 19 2011: Last two whirlybirds installed and all penetrations completed. As predicted, job site was completed around the afternoon after cleanup and remaining shingles were installed.
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Wind turbine preparation work
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New wind turbines installed
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Completed roof
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One side finished
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Closeup of a wind turbine reinstallation
100_1494   < End Report > Code: 133 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.