Edmonton Commercial Flat Roof Inspection, August 2011

This report follows an initial inspection for a commercial client requiring a roof replacement. Also included is a correspondence sent to the client by our project manager. Inspection, August 19, 2011: This roof is accessible by hatch. The current roof system is tar and gravel and is experiencing multiple leaks. Upon inspection I found approximately twenty blisters, numerous spots of surface erosion, and sealants cracking around vents. The client would like a quote for replacement. He will be removing the outside lighting which is set on the parapet walls, but would like us to remove the satellite dish.
The following email was sent to the client by our project manager:
Good morning,
Please find attached the pricing you requested, sorry about the delay - if there is any problem opening the attached let me know and I will resend in a different format.
The documentation and internet links in the attached report detail our; Workmanship Guarantee, System Options and Methods, Credentials, 2011 Schedule Availability, Links to Manufacturers, GRS Project Portfolio and Clients, etc.
Beyond attempting repairs, there are two different methods to do your roof.
One method is to rip the old roof off (a complete replacement) and the other is a new Roof Recovery System.
A Roof Recovery would have our crew scraping the gravel off, taking the old membrane and soaked insulation off (as required only) and then mechanically attaching a fiber board and putting a new roof over top (SBS Torch On, Tar and Gravel Mop On, EPDM, TPO, or PVC per quote).
Typically a roof recovery is what is done. A roof recovery is less intrusive, it is more environmentally friendly as the old bitumen layers don't end up in the land fill, the old system also has an inherent R Value of usually around 7, it is less costly, and the life-cycle is the same as a complete replacement.
However, if you find that you want or are required to completely remove the old system down to the substrate (the sheathing or metal Q deck), we can accommodate this and the pricing is included in the attached documentation also.
Additionally, there are a number of different membranes available, which I've detailed in the quote. Essentially, it comes down to 1) A traditional 4ply mop on tar and gravel (BUR), 2) 2ply SBS Mod Bit (torch down or cold apply), or 3) Single ply; black rubber membrane (EPDM) or a white membrane (TPO or PVC) depending on whether you want to draw the sun in or not. EPDM, TPO, PVC are available in multiple colors, however EPDM out of the box is typically black and TPO / PVC are typically white.
Single ply systems are what are being installed more and more now (for GRS singly ply is about 80%), however, we install all system types. I would encourage you to consider the life-cycle costing and maintenance / repair benefits of a single ply system prior to choosing a system.
Have a read and let us know what you think - I know there is a lot of information so I'm sure you will have questions.
Thanks for the opportunity to quote - it is very much appreciated!
< End Report > CODE: 11361 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Shingles Replacement and Plumbing/Ventilation Maintenance in Edmonton AB, July to August 2011

Below you will find a series of quotations and field reports from our Edmonton roofing repair crew. Our existing client approved our consultation for a full shingle replacement, system maintenance, and waterproofing. Quotation Request Received, July 28 2011: The client asked me to assess all five buildings in the condominium complex and give my recommendations for  each one. There are three 6-unit buildings and two 4-unit buildings. There is also a garage in the rear of the properties. I have attached the dimensions for each building.
Condo unit dimensions, plus garage
Dimensions for the condominium units and garage.
Note as well that there are 4' x 5' flat galvanized metal roofs above each entrance, but they do not require any attention at this time. Repair Assessment FIRST SET The units are past due for a re-roofing. The shingles on the bottom have not been functional for quite some time which has resulted in the roof deck rotting in some areas. The extent of the damage caused by the rot will not be known until we strip the shingles off. The flashing has also become loose, lifting up high enough away from the roofing that rain could easily blow in and damage the interior. I recommend a roof replacement as soon as possible.
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Condo side-view
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Condo front-view
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Weathered shingles
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Shingle assessment
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Flat portion assessment
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Cracked shingling
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Weathered shingles
  Materials required for low-slope application:
  • 41 shingles
  • 125 ft. cap
  • 314 ft. starter/drip
  • 18x 44 in. Ice & Water
  • 6x whirlybirds
  • 12x air vents
  • 6x 4 in. plumbing boots
  • 6x 6" x 4" plumbing pipe
SECOND SET This next unit is also due for a re-roofing, although it is not as urgent as the first. There is no evidence of rotting roof deck, but we will not know for sure until the roof is stripped. The flashing is also becoming loose, but not as bad as the first. I recommend it [the roof] be replaced this season. Materials required for low-slope application:
  • 28 shingles
  • 85 ft. cap
  • 234 ft. starter/drip
  • 13x 44 in. Ice & Water
  • 6x whirlybirds
  • 8x air vents
  • 4x 4 in. plumbing boots
  • 4x 6" x 4" plumbing pipe
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Past due on maintenance
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Cracking shingles
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More shingles requiring replacement
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Rear-view of another condo unit
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Condo side-view
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Front view
  THIRD SET This is a newer roof but it needs some attention. There are many shingles that need to be replaced to bring it back to a reasonable condition. There is also one chimney cap missing on this building. Materials:
  • 5x bundles BP 2-tone grey
  • 6x tubes Karnak
  • 1x 6 in. chimney cap
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Rear-view of condos
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Condo backyard
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Evident wear-and-tear
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Wear-and-tear by the gutters
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Odd shingle out
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Damage attributed to rotting wood
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Cracked roofing
  FOURTH SET Unit in relatively good shape with only a few shingles requiring replacement. Materials:
  • 1x bundle BP 2-tone grey
  • 2x tubes Karnak
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Torn shingles
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Needs replacing!
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Base view
  FIFTH SET The last building I assessed has had its roof replaced at some point but it is already showing signs of deterioration beyond repair. There is too much damage (especially on the bottom portion) to begin repairing it efficiently. One of the whirlybirds has lots several of its mounting screws and now the top portion of it is broken. I recommend that the entire roof be replaced in the near future. Materials required for low-slope application:
  • 41 shingles
  • 125 ft. cap
  • 314 ft. starter/drip
  • 18x 44 in. Ice & Water
  • 6x whirlybirds
  • 12x air vents
  • 6x 4 in. plumbing boots
  • 6x 6" x 4" plumbing pipe
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Damaged whirlybird
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In need of immediate maintenance
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Impeding water run-off
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Edge view
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Possible candidates for wood rot
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Torn shingles
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More torn shingles
Client Provided with Quotation, August 3 2011:
  • Remove shingles; dispose and apply new roofing
  • Types: architectural shingles, premium SBS modified shingles, premium slate/shake, metal/rubber/concrete
  • Venting correction
  • High profile shingle cap
  • Premium 44" Ice & Water protection: includes valleys, neck tie roof openings
  • Coloured flashings: drip edge, gable edge, valley, vents, walls
  • Complete roof underlayment wrap
  • Storm nailing and installation
  • Premium caulking: under vents, exposed nails, valleys, etc.
  • Replacement of rotted roof sheathing
Client approves the work on August 9 2011, crew begins on August 10 2011: The crew went around the roof and picked out all of the damaged shingles. There were a couple of pin-holed shingles as well. It was found that Ice & Water was used under the roof as underlayment. Everything that the crew removed was replaced. The same procedure was followed for the second complex. The shingles up for removal were sealed together very well, so when we applied more force, entire segments ripped off.
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Removing shingles in large segments
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Torn flashing and vent systems requiring maintenance
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Newer roofing system already experiencing weather damage
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Recommended a full replacement
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Top flat roof view
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More shingle removal
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Shingle removal from edges
  When the crew had finished ripping off the shingling on the west side of the sixth unit, we had to waterproof it. It was found that the roof was plank-based, rather than using sheeting. Rotten wood was also found that required replacement (an 8 ft. section). The remaining planks had their nails removed. Once preparation was complete, Ice & Water was applied to the base for waterproofing. The pallets for the east side were delivered later in the afternoon. Weather permitting, we will complete this site tomorrow.  
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Shingles fully removed
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This is what a bare roof looks like
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Cut-out for whirlybird
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Insulated roof
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Plumbing boot reinstalled
August 12, 2011: With respect to unit 6, we started ripping up shingles while concurrently working on plumbing stack penetrations. The penetrations were tarred and neck tied. Concurrently, re-shingled portions of the roof were waterproofed. There was no more rotten wood found. Our compressor stopped working near the end of cap placement. Hand nailing was our only option. Other than that, the day went as planned.
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Weatherproofing ventilation base
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Covering up punctures from the old shingle system
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Plumbing boot installation
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Weatherproofing the ventilation systems
100_1462   August 16, 2011: Remaining shingles on the east side were removed and no more rotten wood has been found on the units. Waterproofing continued and we began waste removal; the garbage bin had arrived in the morning. The crew is ready to begin roofing in the morning. August 17, 2011: West side shingles were removed today, but we got rained out while trying to take off the flashing from the sidings. Installation of replacement shingles began.
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Installing new shingles
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Old shingles undergoing removal
100_1466 August 18, 2011 One of the plumbing stacks came too far out from the roof for the plumbing boot to fit. A crewman was sent back to the shop to get two high dome boots, so we kept putting the PVC pipes in. Two whirlybirds were also cut in and installed. We will complete this site tomorrow around the afternoon.
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Plumbing boot installation
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We had to re-size some segments
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Preparing to install ventilation system
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Installed
  Site Completition, August 19 2011: Last two whirlybirds installed and all penetrations completed. As predicted, job site was completed around the afternoon after cleanup and remaining shingles were installed.
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Wind turbine preparation work
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New wind turbines installed
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Completed roof
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One side finished
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Closeup of a wind turbine reinstallation
100_1494   < End Report > Code: 133 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Edmonton Commercial Metal Roof Leak Repair, August 2011

This report begins with a quotation outlining various options for a metal roof repair. There is moisture entering the building and leaking which is occurring after rain and snow falls. There also appears to be a number of maintenance issues with the existing sheet metal. Roof Observation Report: Very difficult to pinpoint where the moisture is entering, however it appears to be coming in at a number of areas. The metal roofing has a number of maintenance/sheet metal issues but the inherent expansion and contraction also likely causes issue. This roof leaks after the snow melts and heavy rainfalls. The roof is approximately 25 years old and could use a metal roof replacement but the Engineered Liquid Rubber coating will stop the roof from leaking for many years. Project Manager Recommendations (emailed to client):
This roof structure is a candidate for either a repair-maintenance program or an engineered coating and does not have to be replaced. I would not recommend an elastomeric coating or the SPF Spray Foam as the acrylic and EPDM covering options do not last well in Edmonton climate, but liquid rubber performs well in our climate. Generally speaking, metal roof systems are constant aggravating roof structures. Industrial metal roof systems have a deficient design - they are water-shedding and not water-proofing coverings. Metal expands and contracts more than any other roofing material. Metal roofs tend to leak from expansion and contraction and ice / snow loads. Leaks are intermittent at seams, penetrations (stacks, etc.), fasteners (fastener holes get larger with expansion and contraction), around the perimeter as ice back-ups at gutters and then under eave, and at joints between roof and wall connections. Metal rust / corrosion may start at places, the seams and fasteners are vulnerable from expansion / contraction and snow loads, and any traditional caulking or coating won’t last more than a few seasons at best. Remedies are either spot repairs-maintenance with caulking or more extensive maintenance which involves engineered coatings. Our recommendation is a high end engineered liquid rubber polymer coating that carries a 10 Year Manufacturer Warranty and has option for maintenance contracts for extended warranty. General Roofing is considered a pioneer and leader in engineered roof coatings; (www.liquidrubber.ca, https://www.grscanadainc.com/Roof_Coatings.html, https://www.grscanadainc.com/Liquid_Rubber.html). We have significant liquid rubber operations specifically serving industrial facilities with low slope metal roofs. Our clients include companies such as Imperial Oil, Shell Oil, Telus, Fortis, Toran Power, National Oil Well Varco (NOV), Teck Resources, and many more.(https://www.grscanadainc.com/Project_Portfolio.html). In this instance, we recommend a 2 Ply System engineered liquid rubber coat to complete metal roofing, fastener replacement as required, sheet metal repair as required to-achieve a water-tight state. Typically this is even more successful than a full metal roof replacement. A recent project with photos can be found at; http://generalroofingsystemscanadainc.blogspot.ca/2012/05/roof-repair-liquid-rubber-metal-roof.html Thank you.
August 16th, 2011: The crew arrived on site and found two pipe boots and two patches that were leaking. Also discovered were two large holes in the membrane of the north corner (also causing leaking). It appears that something heavy had dropped on the roof at some point causing the holes. The insulation around the two holes was totally saturated and this was clearly allowing quite a bit of water into the system. The insulation is acting like a sponge and is releasing water into the Q deck and lunch room of the building. The crew performed a drip count within the three areas where dripping was occurring. The first drip count was done before the flood test and the results are as follows: Area 1:  every 10 seconds. Area 2:  every 6 seconds. Area 3:  every 19 seconds. After the repair and during the flood test the results were as follows: Area 1:  every 16 seconds. Area 2:  every 20 seconds. Area 3:  none.
The test indicates that the repairs were successful and that there is a slow drip only because of the still saturated insulation. The crew also searched the rooftop for any other possible leak spots. One area was found and patched. It was further reported to the client that the A/C unit in front of the roof hatch was dripping water from inside the unit.
The client was highly satisfied with the execution of the repairs.
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Two large holes in the membrane were found, and the insulation was completely saturated with water. Water had been entering the building through these holes and leaking into the lunch room.
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We moved the ballast rocks around the piping systems and other roof appliances, checking for deficiencies. The coatings around the base of this drain were past their life cycle.
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Second tear location. Although this section of the roof had previously been patched over, some heavy object had fallen and caused the hole.
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The torn off EPDM was tucked back into place, with new liquid rubber coatings applied over top.
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Coatings completed on both tears.
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After the coatings had cured, they were patched over with new EPDM.
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Finally, caulking was applied over the seams to make the new patches watertight.
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We found some other old patchwork that had been provided in past spot repairs. Some of them had been coming apart, although no water had been entering the building through these sections.
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There were a few other patches along the perimeter of the roof that we also identified as requiring touch-ups.
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Liquid rubber coatings and spud at the seams were applied over these patches to mitigate leaking in the future.
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Water had been dripping from inside of the A/C unit into the roof structure.
< End Report >
CODE: 12250
Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Sherwood Park Residential Flat Roof Replacement, August 2011

This client indicated that he would like to stay in his current home for the rest of his life. As such he required a full roof replacement that would last well into the future. There are some re-occurring water leak issues with his current roof and his insurance company will not fix the interior damage until the roof is replaced. Initial state of the rooftop:
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Roof Report, August 3, 2011:
The garage area was prepped along with the eastern side of the house. The vent area was sealed and water proofed. SAMSUNG SAMSUNG SAMSUNG SAMSUNG SAMSUNG Roof Report, August 4th, 2011: The entire garage roof was prepped and made ready for application of EPDM. Then EPDM was applied to just over half of the garage roof. The second half of the garage roof was covered so as to protect from water in the event of rain. DSCF0131 DSCF0132
Roof Report, August 8th, 2011: The 4 scuppers on the east roof of the house were installed today and all of the scuppers were recessed. Material was completely laid on the west side of the house.
The east roof of the house  was made ready for installation of product for tomorrow morning. Client returned home today and seemed pleased with work that had already been done. We would like to inquire as to whether or not there are (2) 20 ft. downspouts and 2 elbows on the work order to be installed with the 2 new scuppers that were added to the house. If so I will need to purchase these tomorrow morning.
DSCF0180 DSCF0181 DSCF0182 DSCF0183 DSCF0184 DSCF0185 DSCF0186 DSCF0187 DSCF0188 DSCF0189 DSCF0190 DSCF0191 Roof Report, August 9th, 2011:
East roof of main house material was laid down today. Curbing and patchwork on west roof's vents were also completed. EPDM was not completely laid going up the walls on the east roof. As of 2:45pm the temperature of the EPDM on the east roof (taken with heat gun) was between 165F and 173F.
Downspouts will be picked up tomorrow morning, and the remainder of the east roof along with any touch ups or detail work will be completed during the day. Barring any unforeseen circumstances this part of the job will be finished by end of day tomorrow.
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Roof Report, September 21, 2011: We began the removal of the scuppers from the house. Once the rest of the crew arrived on site we assisted in the temporary sealing of the scuppers. Counter flashing was installed to help mitigate further leak risk. Caulking was done around the counter flashing and scuppers were temporarily sealed.
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 As this location had several different scopes of work completed (at different times), a subsequent article was made. You can access it by clicking here. < End Report >
CODE: 51369 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Edmonton Commercial Flat Roof Repairs, August 2011

This commercial client required several issues looked at by the GRS crew. The source of a water leak was identified, and our crew also performed repairs to the gum cups and electrical boxes. Roof Report, August 9, 2011: Today I caulked all electrical boxes, topped up three gum cups, and replaced 1 vent cap. I also replaced the wood under the exhaust fan with pressure treated wood. In the report it was suggested we clean tar off of the metal and reseal the penetrations. The only problem with that is I would have had to replace the cap metal all together, and there was nothing wrong with the metal or the seal. I decided to trowel in mastic gum around the ducting instead. I also caulked the window and attempted to clean tar stains off of the stucco wall.
I couldn't fix the electrical conduit or rehang the power box and conduit because it is bent beyond fixing. It has exposed wiring and the compression fittings are seized, we will need an electrician to fix that.
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Roof Report, August 16, 2011:
We put proper insulation under the pressure treated wood along the five units on building 2. I also found a possible leak location on building 3, it was coming into the men's bathroom from ducting under the a/c unit. I found 2 spots in the ducting that were bent open so I pushed them down and caulked them. Also found a vent that wasn't roofed in properly and I fixed that as well by wrapping it in membrane and form flash. Lastly we  put new pressure treated wood and insulation under the unit on building 3.
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< End Report > CODE: 11227
Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Leduc Liquid Rubber Roof Recovery, August 2011

The report below follows the several visits that GRS made to this industrial client's building. Repairs were carried out on a handful of occasions, with a liquid rubber roof recovery performed as well. Continue reading Leduc Liquid Rubber Roof Recovery, August 2011

Edmonton Residential Roof Inspection and Replacement, August 2011

This residential client in Edmonton required an initial roof inspection followed by subsequent roof replacement. The report outlines the progress undertaken by the GRS crew and includes photos. Inspection, August 1, 2011: I met the client at his house and he told me about the leaking and ice damming problems he has been having. His soffits are currently stucco which is something that is not often seen. It appears that there is only mesh across the soffits holding the stucco so there would not be enough support to cut in soffit vents which can be used on wood soffits. I suggested removing the stucco soffit on the eaves and installing aluminum soffit and fascia to get the air flowing through the eaves as well as adding additional ventilation to the roof.  He has a neat cedar design on the gable fascia’ and would prefer to keep them as they are. We also determined that the roof is due for replacement and he would like some options other than the cedar shingles which are on the roof now. The main house is 6/12 pitch with some 12/12 dormers and gable extensions and there is a low slope section on the back which will require 100% ice & water shield as per low slope application. Material Required: note 9 sq. of this project is 12/12 pitch.
  • 50' Valley metal (brown).
  • 6 air vents (to be cut in).
  • (1) 4” plumbing flashing.
  • 100' facia (dark brown).
  • 5 vented soffits (dark brown).
  • 110' soffit J (dark brown).
100_1307 100_1310 100_1311 100_1313 100_1314 100_1315 100_1316 100_1317 100_1318 100_1319 100_1323 Roof Report, August 27, 2011: We got to the job site this morning and started roofing the garage while I had the crew start ripping the old rood from the house. The garage is done, and we have the house water proofed and ready for tomorrow. 100_1572 100_1573 100_1574 100_1575 100_1578 100_1580 100_1581 100_1582 100_1583 Roof Report, August 29, 2011: We showed up in the morning and started ripping the low slope, then I found a couple step flashings too short. The valley is double layered but we got it removed and water proofed for the next day. Roof Report, August 30, 2011: Today I went to the site and started roofing while also helping the crew clean up some garbage in the morning. The bin guy couldn’t make it back today so I didn’t get as much garbage removed as I would have liked. I got most of the back of the house done but I had to use the old led plumbing boot as the one I got was an inch too small. 100_1591 100_1592 100_1594 100_1595 100_1596 100_1597 100_1598 Roof Report, September 1, 2011: I removed the old roof from the front side of the house (the steep dormer and the top roof). I found two squirrel holes under the valley and in the fascia. I covered them with step and no squirrels are getting in now. Were all ready to go tomorrow weather permitting. 100_1609 100_1610 100_1611 100_1612 100_1614 Roof Report, September 5, 2011: We went there Friday hoping to get the job done, in the morning I started ripping the steep parts with the crew. Rain hit at around one o clock or so but it only lasted for about a half hour. We got back to work and pushed as hard as we could. This site is now complete. 100_1619 100_1623 100_1625 100_1627 100_1629 100_1631 100_1632 100_1633 < End Report > CODE: 13109 Contact Us 24 Hour Emergency Roof Repair. Telephone: 1.403.873.7663. Email: info@calgaryroofrepair.ca. Mailing: 240 – 70 Shawville Boulevard SE Calgary, Alberta. T2Y 2Z3. For all other areas of Canada call 1.877.497.3528 Toll Free. We service all areas of southern and central Alberta and south east British Columbia including Airdrie, Banff, Calgary, Canmore, Crossfield, Carstairs, Didsbury, Olds, Sundre, Three Hills, Drumheller, Hanna, Brooks, Bassano, Strathmore, Chestermere, Irricana, Cochrane, Black Diamond, Okotoks, Priddis, Bragg Creek, Cranbrook, Fernie, Panorama, High River, Vulcan, Medicine Hat, Lethbridge, Taber, Sylvan Lake, Red Deer and other Alberta rural points between.