Edmonton Roof Deck Replacement and Waterproofing, October 2011

This residential client was provided with a quotation for the replacement and re-installation of a proper decking and waterproofing system. There is water leaking into the home and proper draining systems need to be installed. This report also includes a follow-up service call. Inspection, October 8, 2011:
The client is looking to have both decks re-surfaced and proper drain systems installed. There is moisture getting into the home in the daughters room. There is also dimpling visible on the ceiling and screws were dropping down, those have since been plastered over. Both decks are pooling water and are improperly sealed. The client believes there is stucco below the deck and has questions about damage to it or the foundation during the process. The client is also looking to have new eaves-troughs installed.
DSCF0709 DSCF0710 DSCF0711 DSCF0712 DSCF0713 DSCF0714 DSCF0715 DSCF0716 DSCF0717 DSCF0718 DSCF0719 DSCF0720 DSCF0721 DSCF0722 DSCF0723
Roof Report, November 27, 2011:
I am unable to give as much slope to the decks as the customer would like as the threshold under his doors is only 1" after I rip the old roof off. I plan on using sloped fiberboard around the wall lines as this will only build it up by .5" and give some sort of slope at the walls. As the threshold is only 1" under the door I don't want to use FR board because this will build the roof up too much. Instead, I plan on using the fast and stick 180 base-sheet as this is mechanically fastened and can be used directly on the plywood deck. Along the wall lines the stucco starts 1" above roof line. In order to be able to ensure a good seal I want to put plywood strips along the wall line at the height of 4" to give me plenty to seal to on the walls. To make this look better for the client I would like to use a black metal flashing over my wall line cap-flashing (to make it look more like crown molding, and it will match the metal cap at the top of the wall). The door provides me with a bigger problem. I would like to run my cap flashing up onto the door sil as this will give me more to seal to instead of trying to work under it as it is only 1". As I know using the torch on his door sil presents a real fire hazard, I would like to use a peel and stick 250 cap with the IKO S.A.M adhesive and a detail roller.
101_0002 101_0003 101_0004 101_0005 101_0006 101_0007 101_0008 101_0009
Roof Report, November 30, 2011:
We ripped off the larger of the two roofs at the back side of the house. Once the old membrane was ripped off we inspected the plywood deck, the plywood was wet but not rotted out in any spots. After the plywood was inspected we put our plywood strips around the perimeter of the building to allow me the height I need to seal my ply's. Once the plywood was installed we cut fiber board on a 45 degree angle and screwed it along the perimeter to create as much slope as the threshold under the door would allow. Once the fiber board was screwed down we laid out our rolls of fast and stick 180. Then we screwed it down for our first ply of the system and torched the laps to make it all water tight. This morning we lost a couple of hours removing snow and chipping ice. After we got all the snow and ice removed from the roof we primed half of the perimeter. I put on the armourbond flash up the walls and sealed it to the top of the plywood to ensure a strong seal. After I finished the flashing I was able to put down half of the 250 cap sheet on the flats of the roof. Once that was done i degranulated the perimeter and moved all of the customers belongings on the deck to the completed side so I can get a good jump start in the morning.
101_0033 101_0034 101_0035 101_0036 101_0037 101_0038 101_0039 101_0040 101_0041 101_0042 101_0044 101_0051
Roof Report, December 4, 2011:
I went to work on the front deck of the house, we ripped off the old membrane and inspected the plywood deck for rotten areas but none were found. As with the back deck the plywood was found to be wet but not damaged in any areas. After we dried the plywood as best as possible, we built the plywood walls around the perimeter to allow me to seal my ply's. Once the wall lines were installed, we used strips of fiber board cut at a 45 degree angle to create as much slope as the threshold around the door would allow. Then we screwed it down. After the fiber board was laid out I was able to lay all of the 180 fast and stick base sheet over all the flats, screwed it all down, and torched all of the laps. Next the plywood wall lines were all primed so I could put my 180 capping on the walls. I was able to cap half of the wall with 180 peel and stick capping, starting from the drain and working out. To make things easier for our next day I torched down my first run of the 250 cap sheet on the flats.
101_0065 101_0066 101_0067 101_0068 101_0069 101_0070 101_0071 101_0072 101_0073 101_0074101_0076
Roof Report, December 12, 2011: This morning we returned to the client's house to continue work on his roof decks. After we finished drying the roof I completed all of the peel and stick capping around the perimeter including under the doorway. Once the 180 capping was complete I finished the flats with the 250 cap sheet, and finished degranulating the perimeter of the 250 cap sheet. I was also able to complete about 40% of the 250 capping along the wall lines. All I have left on this roof is to finish the 250 capping around the wall and put all of the customers furniture back where it was when we showed up. I plan on drying the smaller roof in the morning and then ripping it off first thing.
101_0054 101_0055 101_0056 101_0057
Follow-up Service Call, March 14, 2012:
Arrived at the site and the client showed us the water damage in both of her children's rooms, however there was no water damage in the bathroom between the two rooms.  After inspection of the SBS roof, there were a few blisters starting. These blisters were not attached to any exterior wall or opening in seams, so we suspected that it was moisture underneath the membrane and not a leak from roofing system causing the blister. We discussed with the client that because of the ice on the roof it would be best not to continue the blister repair at this point. Client mentioned that her husband was shoveling the snow off the deck as a preventative measure, which may or may not indicate any attempt to clear the drain. We did suggest that we could conduct a flood test to give the client peace of mind. This would test whether any rain in the meantime would leak from our drain installation. The customer agreed and gave permission for the flood test and remained just inside the home with an open door between us and her. We conducted the flood test and initially there was no moisture coming through where previous leaks occurred.  However, after 30 minutes of flooding the roof on deck, the clients nanny told us that there was a water leak in the kitchen, the floor beneath the original leak locations. At this time we turned off the water. As we came downstairs to inspect the new leak, we suspected that the leaks were not caused from a leak in the membrane on the deck, nor was the problem just a leak around the drain area.  The leak in the kitchen was substantial and furthermore there was water running down over the back entrance on the exterior wall.  After noticing this we went back to the original leak areas (ie. the children's bedrooms) above the kitchen, at which time we noticed that the floor was getting wet in the bedroom directly above the kitchen. We noticed the sound of dripping water while standing in the bathroom between the two bedrooms, client was present when mentioning the sounds coming from inside the walls. It is our conclusion that for this amount of water to penetrate such a large area of the house in such a short time frame the water must be coming from the drain pipe. It is attached to the drain bowl which is enclosed in the wall and exits the exterior wall between the first and second floor (ie. between the kitchen and bedroom directly above). At this point we told the customer that this was not a roofing problem, and that she had a drain problem which would require a plumber. We further advised her that this is not warranty work, any problems to roof assembly that have occurred because of the drain problem would be addressed after the plumbing problem is fixed and would then be chargeable work as our warranty is void if there is an already existing issue outside of the scope of our work.  She is also aware to e-mail GRS with the progress and completion of such work.
March 14 028 March 14 029March 14 031 March 14 032 March 14 033 March 14 034 March 14 035 March 14 036 March 14 037 March 14 038 March 14 039 March 14 040 March 14 041 March 14 042 March 14 045
Roof Report, March 15, 2012:
Arrived at clients home and inspected both drains. First drain inspected while the client poured water down the drain. Fairly steady drip came from seal from the inside of the bowl. The second drain was inspected from open ceiling and the leak was not the bowl itself but the insert attached to the bowl had a horizontal split which was the cause of a substantial leak. We are not certain as to who installed what in this plumbing section. Inserts do need to be changed out. To temporarily fix the leaking we caulked the split on one drain and caulked the ridge of the compression ring on both drains.  We explained to the clients that it is a temporary fix until further action is taken on the part of GRS or a plumber. The split could be a manufacturer default or a crack which was then split from freezing water, or it could be due to someone trying to clear the drain with an object. These are just possible reasons for an uncertain situation and speculation based on the fact that the crack was horizontal. We explained that once the deck is dry and a course of action is decided upon, the drains will be repaired and the blisters would be fixed at the same time.
11230 77 Ave 001 11230 77 Ave 002 11230 77 Ave 003 11230 77 Ave 004 11230 77 Ave 005 11230 77 Ave 007 11230 77 Ave 009 11230 77 Ave 015 11230 77 Ave 016 11230 77 Ave 020 11230 77 Ave 025 11230 77 Ave 033 11230 77 Ave 035 11230 77 Ave 040 11230 77 Ave 044
Service Follow-up, April 1, 2012: The following email was sent by the client to our project manager:
I have water flowing into my great-room, over the deck (currently out of 2 spots at a great rate of flow). There are wet spots all along the path likely leading to the drain area in the front.  The back deck remains ok, with no drainage, but covered up with the tarp still.  The areas fixed on Thursday look intact, but the edges of the repairs are mixed with water and the "fix it material". I have photos and video.  This is similar to what happened in Dec after the original remediation on the decks which supposedly stopped the issue. He told me at the time it was likely an interface with the drain issue that he was able to stop with some caulking. Any thoughts or suggestions on stopping this flow and ongoing issue?
Following this email a crew member was sent out to inspect the leaks, the inspection notes are below:
Client indicated the leak is a very small amount of water that only leaks during a heavy rain fall. The amount is about two to three table spoons of water. The leak comes off of a truss. The client has caulked the metal around the balcony on the bottom which has solved prior leaks.
We flood tested on top of the metal where it was caulked and we attempted to flush water up behind the metal.  The truss started to get moist.  We re-caulked the fastener heads and the old caulking. There may have been pin holes in the caulking. If this doesn't stop the leak then the metal flashing may have to be removed to diagnose the leak further. The roof is wet due to rain and there is rain in the forecast for this afternoon. The client is happy with the trouble shooting and is willing to wait and see if the leak has stopped. There are three buckles that will need to be addressed in the near future.  This can be done with ms detail and grey granules, weather permitting.
IMAG0544 IMAG0545 IMAG0551 IMAG0553 IMAG0554 IMAG0556 IMAG0557 IMAG0560 IMAG0561 IMAG0562 IMAG0563
< End Report > CODE: 11230 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Edmonton Flat Roof Repair and Inspection, October 2011

This report follows an inspection request from a client in Edmonton who was concerned about possible water leaks. After the initial inspection was finished some light repair work was completed by our crew. Inspection, October 17, 2011: I measured the perimeter of the roof (40' by 35'), the customer would like us to redo the mesh and cement along the metal cap flashing as it is cracked in many places. There is a skylight that is leaking near the center of the roof and the diameter of the skylight is 3'. I did not find any splits or cracks in or around the skylight but the customer would like to have it resealed to prevent further leak issues. The roof holds water in large areas as can be seen in the pictures, he would like to know if these areas need to be replaced or are okay until he sells his house. There was a test cut done by another roofing company and he was told the insulation was soaked but he would like a second opinion. Judging by the water ponding and the discoloration of the cap sheet, I am led to assume that the insulation underneath is in fact soaked and probably needs to be replaced. grs pics 087 grs pics 088 grs pics 089 grs pics 090 grs pics 092 Roof Report, November 28, 2011: Attached are some pictures of the troweling work that we completed at this site. The whole perimeter metal flashing was cleaned off and re-cemented as per the customers request. The only thing left to do at this site is put in the new skylight (when it is ready). 101_0010 101_0011 101_0012 101_0013 101_0014 101_0015 101_0016 101_0017 101_0018 101_0019 101_0020 < End Report > CODE: 7908 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Edmonton Industrial Low-Slope Roof Repair, October 2011

The below is a summary of repairs carried out at an industrial business in Edmonton, AB. Having a low-slope roof with apparent water ingress, the client reached out to GRS to provide quotation on temporary repairs or re-roofing the entire system. Our team went out to the client's location to perform an assessment that might be used in a quotation for their roofing problems. We found that the low-slope roof had six penetrations, several of which were damaged (either bent, or losing their seal). It appears that they had already attempted a temporary fix with some tape, but the seams were wearing through already. Inside the warehouse there were some cracks in the ceiling that needed examining, and there was some minor concerns regarding the gutters (slightly askew). We photographed the location and provided quotation for temporary repairs or roof replacement services. The client elected for the repairs at this moment, so we scheduled a time for our crew to return to the site.   Update (October 19, 2011): With the work order submitted, we sent one of our crew members back to the warehouse to perform the spot repairs on the roof. The entire repair took just over three hours to complete, and required minimal materials to carry out.   DSCF0446 DSCF0447 DSCF0448 DSCF0449 DSCF0450 DSCF0451 DSCF0452 DSCF0453 DSCF0454 DSCF0455 DSCF0456 DSCF0457 DSCF0458 DSCF0459 DSCF0460 DSCF0461 DSCF0462 DSCF0463 DSCF0464 DSCF0465 DSCF0466 DSCF0467 DSCF0468 DSCF0469 DSCF0470 DSCF0471   CODE: 53030 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Edmonton Industrial Metal Roof Repair, September 2011

This client needed repairs done to their metal roof on an industrial building of theirs. They reached out to GRS for quotation on repair or replacement options, which we provided to them with our recommendation for replacement. Due to the nature of metal roofing, expansion and contraction in Canada's climate can be a hassle, and repairs are not always the best option to extend the life of the roof.
Table of Contents
  Assessment: September 22, 2011 We sent out one of our crew members to perform an inspection on the roof. The following is from their report: There are two roofs at hand. The upper metal deck measuring 110' x 95', which has eight 12" roof jacks, one air conditioning unit, and one gum box for a 3" gas line. The roof appears to be leaking from seams around the perimeter. The gas line with the gum box is exposed, and all eight roof jacks require resealing. There is a 20' piece of metal flashing missing from the northwest parapet. The lower roof has a metal deck measuring 25' x 50'. I recommend that the high-low wall caulking be redone. The seams around the perimeter also appear to be source of leaks. Edmonton-20110922-00463 Edmonton-20110922-00464 Edmonton-20110922-00465 Edmonton-20110922-00467 Edmonton-20110922-00468 Edmonton-20110922-00469 Edmonton-20110922-00470 Edmonton-20110922-00473 Edmonton-20110922-00474 Edmonton-20110922-00475 Edmonton-20110922-00476 Edmonton-20110922-00477 Edmonton-20110922-00478 Edmonton-20110922-00480 Edmonton-20110922-00481 IMG-20110922-00457 IMG-20110922-00458 IMG-20110922-00459 IMG-20110922-00460 IMG-20110922-00461 IMG-20110922-00462 IMG-20110922-00466 IMG-20110922-00471 IMG-20110922-00472   Quotation Delivered: September 26, 2011 The client sought quotation for repairs to their industrial metal roofing system. When returning the quotation, we noted that the issue, specifically to this roof, is that it is at the point where it should be coated or replaced. Spot repairs will likely bring more aggravations as the expansion and contraction of seams, fasteners, penetrations, etc. is at the point where spot repairs likely won't last long and would come with no guarantees. After receiving the quotation, the client wrote back to request that spot repairs be made. They are currently planning renovations to the building, and will likely have to put some more holes into the roof during that time. Once that is done, they would be open to re-evaluating any roof recovery or coating, but for the time being, the spot repairs will be sufficient. They also noted that in the wintertime there are serious concerns about ice buildup and icicles coming from the eavestroughs, and would like to have them replaced with continuous eaves. We scheduled the client for service three weeks later, and noted that we'll measure the eaves in the meantime. Typical turnaround time on eaves of that length, however, can be up to a month.   Roof Report: October 30, 2011 We arrived on site in the morning and filled out all of the necessary safety documentation. The aerial lift was missing a certificate, so we had it switched out for another one and used a pull-rope hoist to get the tools onto the roof in the meanwhile. Once on the roof, two members began sweeping and shovelling the snow off the roof and chipped away thick segments of ice to clean up the areas where repairs would be done. The new lift came in with an appropriate certificate and was presented to the client. We cleaned out the eavestroughs on the front of the building and dealt with the ice buildup that the client had noted some weeks earlier. In the early afternoon, however, heavy snowfall rolled in and hindered work. The team departed the worksite after storing the tools. IMG_2433 IMG_2434 IMG_2435 IMG_2436 IMG_2437 IMG_2438 IMG_2439 IMG_2440 IMG_2441 IMG_2442 IMG_2443 IMG_2445 IMG_2446 IMG_2447 IMG_2450 IMG_2451 IMG_2452 IMG_2453 Roof Report: November 2, 2011 The team arrived on site again to find themselves met with the previous day's snowfall and ice buildup once again. Save for a lunch break, the bulk of the day was spent removing snow and ice buildup from the eavestroughs and clearing the worksite. IMG_2489 IMG_2488 IMG_2487 IMG_2513 IMG_2512 IMG_2511 IMG_2510 Edmonton-20121102-00243 Edmonton-20121102-00241 Edmonton-20121102-00240 Edmonton-20121102-00239 Edmonton-20121102-00238 IMG_2453 IMG_2452 IMG_2451 Roof Report: November 3, 2011 This day saw even more ice and snow cleared from the eavestroughs and the roof in preparation for the rubber application. Shortly after finishing the worksite preparation, they had set up the pump, mixed the saltwater solution and stirred the rubber. 75% of one side was finished in the day, with an estimated 3.5 - 4 hours worth of rubber spraying to finish the following day. The pump was cleaned out, and the team packed up for the day. Roof Report: November 4, 2011 Back on site, the team scraped off a small amount of ice that had built up overnight. They set up the liquid rubber pump and sprayed the remaining sections of the roof. Afterwards, a beauty cap was ordered to be later fastened to the building, and the pump was cleaned out to specification. The remaining work to be completed is the beauty cap, 9" rain caps (to replace some broken ones), and fasten the new eavestroughs once the ice has melted away. IMG_2518 IMG_2519 IMG_2520 IMG_2521 IMG_2522 IMG_2523 IMG_2524 IMG_2525 IMG_2526 IMG_2527 IMG_2528 IMG_2529 IMG_2530 IMG_2531 IMG_2532 IMG_2533 IMG_2534 IMG_2535 IMG_2540 IMG_2542 IMG_2543 IMG_2544 IMG_2545 IMG_2546 IMG_2547 IMG_2548 IMG_2549 IMG_2550 IMG_2551 IMG_2552 IMG_2553 IMG_2554 < End Report > CODE: 11211 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Shake Roof Inspection, September 2011, Edmonton

This brief report outlines GRS' contact with a client that has an aging cedar shake roof that is in need of replacement. GRS sent out a technician to inspect the site and take measurements to see exactly what kind of shape the roof is in, and how much material will be needed to carry out the service. Continue reading Shake Roof Inspection, September 2011, Edmonton

Edmonton Commercial Flat Roof Inspection, August 2011

This report follows an initial inspection for a commercial client requiring a roof replacement. Also included is a correspondence sent to the client by our project manager. Inspection, August 19, 2011: This roof is accessible by hatch. The current roof system is tar and gravel and is experiencing multiple leaks. Upon inspection I found approximately twenty blisters, numerous spots of surface erosion, and sealants cracking around vents. The client would like a quote for replacement. He will be removing the outside lighting which is set on the parapet walls, but would like us to remove the satellite dish.
The following email was sent to the client by our project manager:
Good morning,
Please find attached the pricing you requested, sorry about the delay - if there is any problem opening the attached let me know and I will resend in a different format.
The documentation and internet links in the attached report detail our; Workmanship Guarantee, System Options and Methods, Credentials, 2011 Schedule Availability, Links to Manufacturers, GRS Project Portfolio and Clients, etc.
Beyond attempting repairs, there are two different methods to do your roof.
One method is to rip the old roof off (a complete replacement) and the other is a new Roof Recovery System.
A Roof Recovery would have our crew scraping the gravel off, taking the old membrane and soaked insulation off (as required only) and then mechanically attaching a fiber board and putting a new roof over top (SBS Torch On, Tar and Gravel Mop On, EPDM, TPO, or PVC per quote).
Typically a roof recovery is what is done. A roof recovery is less intrusive, it is more environmentally friendly as the old bitumen layers don't end up in the land fill, the old system also has an inherent R Value of usually around 7, it is less costly, and the life-cycle is the same as a complete replacement.
However, if you find that you want or are required to completely remove the old system down to the substrate (the sheathing or metal Q deck), we can accommodate this and the pricing is included in the attached documentation also.
Additionally, there are a number of different membranes available, which I've detailed in the quote. Essentially, it comes down to 1) A traditional 4ply mop on tar and gravel (BUR), 2) 2ply SBS Mod Bit (torch down or cold apply), or 3) Single ply; black rubber membrane (EPDM) or a white membrane (TPO or PVC) depending on whether you want to draw the sun in or not. EPDM, TPO, PVC are available in multiple colors, however EPDM out of the box is typically black and TPO / PVC are typically white.
Single ply systems are what are being installed more and more now (for GRS singly ply is about 80%), however, we install all system types. I would encourage you to consider the life-cycle costing and maintenance / repair benefits of a single ply system prior to choosing a system.
Have a read and let us know what you think - I know there is a lot of information so I'm sure you will have questions.
Thanks for the opportunity to quote - it is very much appreciated!
< End Report > CODE: 11361 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Shingles Replacement and Plumbing/Ventilation Maintenance in Edmonton AB, July to August 2011

Below you will find a series of quotations and field reports from our Edmonton roofing repair crew. Our existing client approved our consultation for a full shingle replacement, system maintenance, and waterproofing. Quotation Request Received, July 28 2011: The client asked me to assess all five buildings in the condominium complex and give my recommendations for  each one. There are three 6-unit buildings and two 4-unit buildings. There is also a garage in the rear of the properties. I have attached the dimensions for each building.
Condo unit dimensions, plus garage
Dimensions for the condominium units and garage.
Note as well that there are 4' x 5' flat galvanized metal roofs above each entrance, but they do not require any attention at this time. Repair Assessment FIRST SET The units are past due for a re-roofing. The shingles on the bottom have not been functional for quite some time which has resulted in the roof deck rotting in some areas. The extent of the damage caused by the rot will not be known until we strip the shingles off. The flashing has also become loose, lifting up high enough away from the roofing that rain could easily blow in and damage the interior. I recommend a roof replacement as soon as possible.
100_1240
Condo side-view
100_1241
Condo front-view
100_1243
Weathered shingles
100_1242
Shingle assessment
100_1245
Flat portion assessment
100_1246
Cracked shingling
100_1244
Weathered shingles
  Materials required for low-slope application:
  • 41 shingles
  • 125 ft. cap
  • 314 ft. starter/drip
  • 18x 44 in. Ice & Water
  • 6x whirlybirds
  • 12x air vents
  • 6x 4 in. plumbing boots
  • 6x 6" x 4" plumbing pipe
SECOND SET This next unit is also due for a re-roofing, although it is not as urgent as the first. There is no evidence of rotting roof deck, but we will not know for sure until the roof is stripped. The flashing is also becoming loose, but not as bad as the first. I recommend it [the roof] be replaced this season. Materials required for low-slope application:
  • 28 shingles
  • 85 ft. cap
  • 234 ft. starter/drip
  • 13x 44 in. Ice & Water
  • 6x whirlybirds
  • 8x air vents
  • 4x 4 in. plumbing boots
  • 4x 6" x 4" plumbing pipe
100_1257
Past due on maintenance
100_1259
Cracking shingles
100_1260
More shingles requiring replacement
100_1261
Rear-view of another condo unit
100_1283
Condo side-view
100_1287
Front view
  THIRD SET This is a newer roof but it needs some attention. There are many shingles that need to be replaced to bring it back to a reasonable condition. There is also one chimney cap missing on this building. Materials:
  • 5x bundles BP 2-tone grey
  • 6x tubes Karnak
  • 1x 6 in. chimney cap
100_1265
Rear-view of condos
100_1267
Condo backyard
100_1269
Evident wear-and-tear
100_1275
Wear-and-tear by the gutters
100_1271
Odd shingle out
100_1278
Damage attributed to rotting wood
100_1280
Cracked roofing
  FOURTH SET Unit in relatively good shape with only a few shingles requiring replacement. Materials:
  • 1x bundle BP 2-tone grey
  • 2x tubes Karnak
100_1290
Torn shingles
100_1292
Needs replacing!
100_1293
Base view
  FIFTH SET The last building I assessed has had its roof replaced at some point but it is already showing signs of deterioration beyond repair. There is too much damage (especially on the bottom portion) to begin repairing it efficiently. One of the whirlybirds has lots several of its mounting screws and now the top portion of it is broken. I recommend that the entire roof be replaced in the near future. Materials required for low-slope application:
  • 41 shingles
  • 125 ft. cap
  • 314 ft. starter/drip
  • 18x 44 in. Ice & Water
  • 6x whirlybirds
  • 12x air vents
  • 6x 4 in. plumbing boots
  • 6x 6" x 4" plumbing pipe
100_1254
Damaged whirlybird
100_1247
In need of immediate maintenance
100_1248
Impeding water run-off
100_1250
Edge view
100_1249
Possible candidates for wood rot
100_1251
Torn shingles
100_1255
More torn shingles
Client Provided with Quotation, August 3 2011:
  • Remove shingles; dispose and apply new roofing
  • Types: architectural shingles, premium SBS modified shingles, premium slate/shake, metal/rubber/concrete
  • Venting correction
  • High profile shingle cap
  • Premium 44" Ice & Water protection: includes valleys, neck tie roof openings
  • Coloured flashings: drip edge, gable edge, valley, vents, walls
  • Complete roof underlayment wrap
  • Storm nailing and installation
  • Premium caulking: under vents, exposed nails, valleys, etc.
  • Replacement of rotted roof sheathing
Client approves the work on August 9 2011, crew begins on August 10 2011: The crew went around the roof and picked out all of the damaged shingles. There were a couple of pin-holed shingles as well. It was found that Ice & Water was used under the roof as underlayment. Everything that the crew removed was replaced. The same procedure was followed for the second complex. The shingles up for removal were sealed together very well, so when we applied more force, entire segments ripped off.
100_1423
Removing shingles in large segments
100_1242
Torn flashing and vent systems requiring maintenance
100_1243
Newer roofing system already experiencing weather damage
100_1244
Recommended a full replacement
100_1245
Top flat roof view
100_1417
More shingle removal
100_1426
Shingle removal from edges
  When the crew had finished ripping off the shingling on the west side of the sixth unit, we had to waterproof it. It was found that the roof was plank-based, rather than using sheeting. Rotten wood was also found that required replacement (an 8 ft. section). The remaining planks had their nails removed. Once preparation was complete, Ice & Water was applied to the base for waterproofing. The pallets for the east side were delivered later in the afternoon. Weather permitting, we will complete this site tomorrow.  
100_1444
Shingles fully removed
100_1446
This is what a bare roof looks like
100_1453
Cut-out for whirlybird
100_1452
Insulated roof
100_1454
Plumbing boot reinstalled
August 12, 2011: With respect to unit 6, we started ripping up shingles while concurrently working on plumbing stack penetrations. The penetrations were tarred and neck tied. Concurrently, re-shingled portions of the roof were waterproofed. There was no more rotten wood found. Our compressor stopped working near the end of cap placement. Hand nailing was our only option. Other than that, the day went as planned.
100_1458
Weatherproofing ventilation base
100_1461
Covering up punctures from the old shingle system
100_1459
Plumbing boot installation
100_1463
Weatherproofing the ventilation systems
100_1462   August 16, 2011: Remaining shingles on the east side were removed and no more rotten wood has been found on the units. Waterproofing continued and we began waste removal; the garbage bin had arrived in the morning. The crew is ready to begin roofing in the morning. August 17, 2011: West side shingles were removed today, but we got rained out while trying to take off the flashing from the sidings. Installation of replacement shingles began.
100_1464
Installing new shingles
100_1465
Old shingles undergoing removal
100_1466 August 18, 2011 One of the plumbing stacks came too far out from the roof for the plumbing boot to fit. A crewman was sent back to the shop to get two high dome boots, so we kept putting the PVC pipes in. Two whirlybirds were also cut in and installed. We will complete this site tomorrow around the afternoon.
100_1471
Plumbing boot installation
100_1470
We had to re-size some segments
100_1467
Preparing to install ventilation system
100_1468
Installed
  Site Completition, August 19 2011: Last two whirlybirds installed and all penetrations completed. As predicted, job site was completed around the afternoon after cleanup and remaining shingles were installed.
100_1495
Wind turbine preparation work
100_1497
New wind turbines installed
100_1498
Completed roof
100_1492
One side finished
100_1493
Closeup of a wind turbine reinstallation
100_1494   < End Report > Code: 133 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Edmonton Commercial Metal Roof Leak Repair, August 2011

This report begins with a quotation outlining various options for a metal roof repair. There is moisture entering the building and leaking which is occurring after rain and snow falls. There also appears to be a number of maintenance issues with the existing sheet metal. Roof Observation Report: Very difficult to pinpoint where the moisture is entering, however it appears to be coming in at a number of areas. The metal roofing has a number of maintenance/sheet metal issues but the inherent expansion and contraction also likely causes issue. This roof leaks after the snow melts and heavy rainfalls. The roof is approximately 25 years old and could use a metal roof replacement but the Engineered Liquid Rubber coating will stop the roof from leaking for many years. Project Manager Recommendations (emailed to client):
This roof structure is a candidate for either a repair-maintenance program or an engineered coating and does not have to be replaced. I would not recommend an elastomeric coating or the SPF Spray Foam as the acrylic and EPDM covering options do not last well in Edmonton climate, but liquid rubber performs well in our climate. Generally speaking, metal roof systems are constant aggravating roof structures. Industrial metal roof systems have a deficient design - they are water-shedding and not water-proofing coverings. Metal expands and contracts more than any other roofing material. Metal roofs tend to leak from expansion and contraction and ice / snow loads. Leaks are intermittent at seams, penetrations (stacks, etc.), fasteners (fastener holes get larger with expansion and contraction), around the perimeter as ice back-ups at gutters and then under eave, and at joints between roof and wall connections. Metal rust / corrosion may start at places, the seams and fasteners are vulnerable from expansion / contraction and snow loads, and any traditional caulking or coating won’t last more than a few seasons at best. Remedies are either spot repairs-maintenance with caulking or more extensive maintenance which involves engineered coatings. Our recommendation is a high end engineered liquid rubber polymer coating that carries a 10 Year Manufacturer Warranty and has option for maintenance contracts for extended warranty. General Roofing is considered a pioneer and leader in engineered roof coatings; (www.liquidrubber.ca, https://www.grscanadainc.com/Roof_Coatings.html, https://www.grscanadainc.com/Liquid_Rubber.html). We have significant liquid rubber operations specifically serving industrial facilities with low slope metal roofs. Our clients include companies such as Imperial Oil, Shell Oil, Telus, Fortis, Toran Power, National Oil Well Varco (NOV), Teck Resources, and many more.(https://www.grscanadainc.com/Project_Portfolio.html). In this instance, we recommend a 2 Ply System engineered liquid rubber coat to complete metal roofing, fastener replacement as required, sheet metal repair as required to-achieve a water-tight state. Typically this is even more successful than a full metal roof replacement. A recent project with photos can be found at; http://generalroofingsystemscanadainc.blogspot.ca/2012/05/roof-repair-liquid-rubber-metal-roof.html Thank you.
August 16th, 2011: The crew arrived on site and found two pipe boots and two patches that were leaking. Also discovered were two large holes in the membrane of the north corner (also causing leaking). It appears that something heavy had dropped on the roof at some point causing the holes. The insulation around the two holes was totally saturated and this was clearly allowing quite a bit of water into the system. The insulation is acting like a sponge and is releasing water into the Q deck and lunch room of the building. The crew performed a drip count within the three areas where dripping was occurring. The first drip count was done before the flood test and the results are as follows: Area 1:  every 10 seconds. Area 2:  every 6 seconds. Area 3:  every 19 seconds. After the repair and during the flood test the results were as follows: Area 1:  every 16 seconds. Area 2:  every 20 seconds. Area 3:  none.
The test indicates that the repairs were successful and that there is a slow drip only because of the still saturated insulation. The crew also searched the rooftop for any other possible leak spots. One area was found and patched. It was further reported to the client that the A/C unit in front of the roof hatch was dripping water from inside the unit.
The client was highly satisfied with the execution of the repairs.
DSC01206
Two large holes in the membrane were found, and the insulation was completely saturated with water. Water had been entering the building through these holes and leaking into the lunch room.
DSC01207
We moved the ballast rocks around the piping systems and other roof appliances, checking for deficiencies. The coatings around the base of this drain were past their life cycle.
DSC01209
Second tear location. Although this section of the roof had previously been patched over, some heavy object had fallen and caused the hole.
DSC01210
The torn off EPDM was tucked back into place, with new liquid rubber coatings applied over top.
DSC01211
Coatings completed on both tears.
DSC01212
After the coatings had cured, they were patched over with new EPDM.
DSC01213
Finally, caulking was applied over the seams to make the new patches watertight.
DSC01216
We found some other old patchwork that had been provided in past spot repairs. Some of them had been coming apart, although no water had been entering the building through these sections.
DSC01217
There were a few other patches along the perimeter of the roof that we also identified as requiring touch-ups.
DSC01218
Liquid rubber coatings and spud at the seams were applied over these patches to mitigate leaking in the future.
DSC01219
Water had been dripping from inside of the A/C unit into the roof structure.
< End Report >
CODE: 12250
Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Sherwood Park Residential Flat Roof Replacement, August 2011

This client indicated that he would like to stay in his current home for the rest of his life. As such he required a full roof replacement that would last well into the future. There are some re-occurring water leak issues with his current roof and his insurance company will not fix the interior damage until the roof is replaced. Initial state of the rooftop:
Shane Ferguson 277 51369 RR 225 #1 Shane Ferguson 277 51369 RR 225 #2 Shane Ferguson 277 51369 RR 225 #3 Shane Ferguson 277 51369 RR 225 #4 Shane Ferguson 277 51369 RR 225 #5 Shane Ferguson 277 51369 RR 225 #6 Shane Ferguson 277 51369 RR 225 #7 Shane Ferguson 277 51369 RR 225 #8 Shane Ferguson 277 51369 RR 225 #9 Shane Ferguson 277 51369 RR 225 #10 Shane Ferguson 277 51369 RR 225 #11 Shane Ferguson 277 51369 RR 225 #12 Shane Ferguson 277 51369 RR 225 #13 Shane Ferguson 277 51369 RR 225 #14 Shane Ferguson 277 51369 RR 225 #16 Shane Ferguson 277 51369 RR 225 #15 Shane Ferguson 277 51369 RR 225 #17 Shane Ferguson 277 51369 RR 225 #18 Shane Ferguson 277 51369 RR 225
Roof Report, August 3, 2011:
The garage area was prepped along with the eastern side of the house. The vent area was sealed and water proofed. SAMSUNG SAMSUNG SAMSUNG SAMSUNG SAMSUNG Roof Report, August 4th, 2011: The entire garage roof was prepped and made ready for application of EPDM. Then EPDM was applied to just over half of the garage roof. The second half of the garage roof was covered so as to protect from water in the event of rain. DSCF0131 DSCF0132
Roof Report, August 8th, 2011: The 4 scuppers on the east roof of the house were installed today and all of the scuppers were recessed. Material was completely laid on the west side of the house.
The east roof of the house  was made ready for installation of product for tomorrow morning. Client returned home today and seemed pleased with work that had already been done. We would like to inquire as to whether or not there are (2) 20 ft. downspouts and 2 elbows on the work order to be installed with the 2 new scuppers that were added to the house. If so I will need to purchase these tomorrow morning.
DSCF0180 DSCF0181 DSCF0182 DSCF0183 DSCF0184 DSCF0185 DSCF0186 DSCF0187 DSCF0188 DSCF0189 DSCF0190 DSCF0191 Roof Report, August 9th, 2011:
East roof of main house material was laid down today. Curbing and patchwork on west roof's vents were also completed. EPDM was not completely laid going up the walls on the east roof. As of 2:45pm the temperature of the EPDM on the east roof (taken with heat gun) was between 165F and 173F.
Downspouts will be picked up tomorrow morning, and the remainder of the east roof along with any touch ups or detail work will be completed during the day. Barring any unforeseen circumstances this part of the job will be finished by end of day tomorrow.
DSCF0192DSCF0193DSCF0194DSCF0195DSCF0196DSCF0197DSCF0198DSCF0199DSCF0200DSCF0201
Roof Report, September 21, 2011: We began the removal of the scuppers from the house. Once the rest of the crew arrived on site we assisted in the temporary sealing of the scuppers. Counter flashing was installed to help mitigate further leak risk. Caulking was done around the counter flashing and scuppers were temporarily sealed.
IMG-20110921-00424 IMG-20110921-00425 IMG-20110921-00426 IMG-20110921-00430 IMG-20110921-00431 IMG-20110921-00432 IMG-20110921-00433 IMG-20110921-00434 IMG-20110921-00435 IMG-20110921-00436 IMG-20110921-00437 IMG-20110921-00438 IMG-20110921-00439
 As this location had several different scopes of work completed (at different times), a subsequent article was made. You can access it by clicking here. < End Report >
CODE: 51369 Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.

Edmonton Commercial Flat Roof Repairs, August 2011

This commercial client required several issues looked at by the GRS crew. The source of a water leak was identified, and our crew also performed repairs to the gum cups and electrical boxes. Roof Report, August 9, 2011: Today I caulked all electrical boxes, topped up three gum cups, and replaced 1 vent cap. I also replaced the wood under the exhaust fan with pressure treated wood. In the report it was suggested we clean tar off of the metal and reseal the penetrations. The only problem with that is I would have had to replace the cap metal all together, and there was nothing wrong with the metal or the seal. I decided to trowel in mastic gum around the ducting instead. I also caulked the window and attempted to clean tar stains off of the stucco wall.
I couldn't fix the electrical conduit or rehang the power box and conduit because it is bent beyond fixing. It has exposed wiring and the compression fittings are seized, we will need an electrician to fix that.
DSC01097DSC01098DSC01099DSC01100DSC01101DSC01102DSC01103DSC01104DSC01105DSC01106DSC01107DSC01108DSC01109DSC01110DSC01111DSC01117DSC01118DSC01119DSC01120DSC01121DSC01122DSC01123DSC01124DSC01125DSC01126DSC01127DSC01128DSC01129DSC01130DSC01131DSC01132DSC01133
Roof Report, August 16, 2011:
We put proper insulation under the pressure treated wood along the five units on building 2. I also found a possible leak location on building 3, it was coming into the men's bathroom from ducting under the a/c unit. I found 2 spots in the ducting that were bent open so I pushed them down and caulked them. Also found a vent that wasn't roofed in properly and I fixed that as well by wrapping it in membrane and form flash. Lastly we  put new pressure treated wood and insulation under the unit on building 3.
DSC01206 DSC01224 DSC01225 DSC01226 DSC01227 DSC01228 DSC01229 DSC01230 DSC01231 DSC01232 DSC01233 DSC01236
< End Report > CODE: 11227
Contact Us Call our 24 hour emergency roof repair at 1.780.424.7663. Mail to: 3428 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T6E-5X5. We service all of Alberta including Edmonton, Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Fort Saskatchewan, St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Beaumont, Lac La Biche, Grande Prairie, High Level, Westlock, Slave Lake, Edson, Drayton Valley, Devon, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Tofield, Lamont, Morinville, Vegreville, Tofield, Millet, Calmar, Evansburg, Redwater, Onaway, Viking, Athabasca, High Prairie, Valleyview, Fairview, Peace River, Whitecourt, Mayerthorpe and many more rural areas and towns.